SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 51 to 75 of 87
  1. #51
    Non-Member Musicbox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    india
    Posts
    1,331
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    its not easy to find yourself on google and if you put it through blogger or facebook your identity is online ha ha ha

  2. #52
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy mizwizzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    1,322
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by php_daemon View Post

    Now there are lots of other results that aren't me (actually there's just one that is related to me), and someone else's facebook profile is now #1.

    If I was using my name as a brand or if I was at least using my full name online in public space, I'd spread the word on the web about how great I am and make sure that's the only thing that can be found in top results.
    That's actually really interesting Saul, getting cached on google indirectly - whether through social networking or friends - ooh thats a tricky one alright I like that idea too if you are going to be putting yourself out there make sure that you do have positive results, thats good thinking I like that approach

    Quote Originally Posted by php_daemon View Post
    On the contrary, that's a good reason to start being concerned about your PR. So you've been paranoid about your privacy all these years, and all of a sudden another Hazel with the same last name comes online and creates a blog about how she breeds and exports leprechauns to the north pole for underpaid elf labor. Now you've suddenly become a leprechaun smuggler.

    If your name is important to you for any reason, be it potential employers or clients Googling you, you'd better start posting about yourself and a lot, to push those horrible results to the oblivion.
    I don't use my name for anything really other than my magnificent existence My business name takes care of my online presence and most of my work is word of mouth anyways or through my own networking - so for me I don't market my name at all

    @ leprechauns!

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    What's to stop other people spreading FUD about you on the Internet? You can't protect your privacy when clearly anyone can say anything about anyone they do or don't know and to any potential employer it's worth using as "evidence", I know of ACTUAL cases where employers have refused to employ someone on the basis of opinions or hearsay about a person without a shred of evidence to back up the claims. There's no point covering up your privacy on that basis, it's like trying to keep the titanic afloat using hugs and kisses. All this effort your putting into protecting yourself for employment is pretty useless if all it takes is some untrue web trolling or slander to ruin your career prospects... just be as open as possible and throw your hands in the air, because you don't stand a chance.

    PS: Mizwizzy no longer exports leprechauns since they've been listed as an endangered species, now she complies with all applicable preservation laws.
    Surely if someone posted content about you online that was illegal or untrue, if you found that person you could sue or charge them with defamation, loss of earnings or something?

    haw haw @ your reply to Saul

    Quote Originally Posted by php_daemon View Post
    That is if someone puts more effort into slandering you than you put effort to build your PR. Unless someone really really doesn't like you, you should be able to drown them in the shadow of your greatness
    Some people say that even if the publicity is bad it's still good, the more people talk about you the better regardless of the material being bad - i'm not sure i'm completely convinced of that yet especially when it comes to employment opportunities - but then again you have that whole advertising platform that may be desirable to clients

  3. #53
    ✯✯✯ silver trophybronze trophy php_daemon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    5,284
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mizwizzy View Post
    Some people say that even if the publicity is bad it's still good, the more people talk about you the better regardless of the material being bad - i'm not sure i'm completely convinced of that yet especially when it comes to employment opportunities - but then again you have that whole advertising platform that may be desirable to clients
    Yes, it's what you do with that publicity that matters. Turning bad publicity around with all the attention to your favour is an art.

    But you can also screw up and get hurt.
    Saul

  4. #54
    SitePoint Wizard ryanhellyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mizwizzy View Post
    wow Ryan, that must have been embarassing - did anyone ever say anything about this other person to you, wondering if it was you? Like when you started web development I'm assuming the site was still out there somewhere?
    No. It disappeared long before I knew that a web page even had code.

    Interestingly the other person's occupation was a web developer also. If you hunt a few dozen pages down a search for my name in Google there is a single page advertising his services still. I'm not sure if he's still in the industry, but if he is, he's not using his name to market himself ... or he's pretending to me

  5. #55
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy mizwizzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    1,322
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ryanhellyer View Post
    No. It disappeared long before I knew that a web page even had code.

    Interestingly the other person's occupation was a web developer also. If you hunt a few dozen pages down a search for my name in Google there is a single page advertising his services still. I'm not sure if he's still in the industry, but if he is, he's not using his name to market himself ... or he's pretending to me
    would you ever consider contacting him?

  6. #56
    SitePoint Wizard ryanhellyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mizwizzy View Post
    would you ever consider contacting him?
    Yes. But I've never found any contact details for him directly. Because of the nature of his business interests he may not have wanted to be contactable.

  7. #57
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think if you have a blog, business or website then its okay to be "very Googleable" but if its about your name (full name) then I don't think its alright. Too much information can backfire...and scammers can always use it to scam you or your family members.

  8. #58
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    0
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Siremethmimetes View Post
    I am very dominant in the search results for my alias (Sir Emeth, or Sir Emeth Mimetes) and my real name (Jay Lauser). I use both for almost everything, so I don't mind them not being separate.

    I am very open in what I put on the internet. I do not believe in living a secret life of things that would embarrass you if they were discovered. If I was worried about someone finding out about something that I did, I should stop doing it.
    I feel the same! Except my parents, yes, I wouldnt want my parents to read everything about what i do - and im in my thirties!

  9. #59
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    N43 44.4824', W079 13.9408
    Posts
    2,220
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I fall into the same Range as Alex, if anyone Googles my name including my last name there are many, many out there with my last name. I even came across a attractive Blonde with the same last name who some could say "maybe that is sister" although she isn't !

    I've been pretty good at controlling the information that I put online what you find out about me is exactly what I want you to find out about me. Although I can't control someone taking a picture of me outside and posting it on there FaceBook page with everyone having some form of mobile device that can almost cook them breakfast, lunch and supper it's not a surprise.

    You can have some control over your information that you post online, there are many people who I have Google and I can't find nothing on them so it's not true that you can find out about everyone, mostly those who are active and open online or younger folk who seem so free spirited to post anything and everything and then wonder or will wonder why it's going to come back and haunt them.

  10. #60
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy mizwizzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    1,322
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    yeah i feel sorry for those guys who are a bit naive and innocent when it comes to the www!

    Is it not illegal for someone to take a picture of you like that and post it on the web without your permission?

  11. #61
    SitePoint Wizard ryanhellyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mizwizzy View Post
    Is it not illegal for someone to take a picture of you like that and post it on the web without your permission?
    Laws for such things vary wildly between countries.

  12. #62
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy mizwizzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    1,322
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    of course Ryan, I guess its too much of a generalised question really, the idea of being cached on google without your consent and so freely is quite daunting to say the least especially if it's perfectly within that "publishers" right to do so

  13. #63
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My name is seemingly unique in the world from my searches. (Less than 50 in the world with the same surname even)... so it is all about "me".

    I have found some odd entries where people have a habit of posting ancient information from the pre-internet age of my childhood onto the internet! Some of these are a little disturbing in implications for the future....

    One example is from a old paper-based newsletter with a small distribution circle, from a small local community where I used to live some 20 years ago. They have recently started pulling extracts from its archives (a "this month 10, 20, 30 & 40 years ago" type thing). Of course as well as having the same small local readership, the current newsletter is also posted online. So recently, my name appeared in a flashback to 20 years ago, and the info appears in Google now and therefore no doubt cached forever. Nothing worrying in it per se, but the uploading of older data by others, is something you have no control over and is an interesting trend to keep an eye on! What you might have said 20 years ago to a closed distribution paper newsletter and what you might post on the internet might be two different things... yet they are merging without my permission.

    A few months back, I was pondering the scary scenario that in the future, some oppressive regime came to power and did a holocaust type round up based upon a Google searches... on political, religious, ethnic, or other discriminatory grounds.

    Data mining and aggregation is only going to get more sophisticated and more discerning in the future.

    If caching by google (and others) makes it virtually impossible to remove anything once it has been posted (even if only briefly before being deleted), then maybe we should be more concerned than we are about what gets online in the first place and how that information might be used against us?

    There is certainly food for thought, and we'd be wise to consider the future implications before it is too late.

    Having said all that, I am remarkably laid back about it all... I just have occasional lightbulb moments, that makes me go back and rethink my attitude, double check my Facebook privacy settings, and go and do a google checkup on my name etc.

    We don't need to live in fear or paranoia (just yet!), but I think being guarded in a what we say and do is wise.

    Mike

  14. #64
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy mizwizzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    1,322
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah Mike I agree for sure You can never be too tuned into what you do online, even if you do think ur being overly paranoid isn't it better to be safe than sorry at the end of the day?

    That whole issue about having stuff posted without your permission is a bit of a niggling issue for me, I wouldn't like that to happen to me regardless of the impact even if it was something trivial, its the principle of the matter/act that would bother me - if i wanted it out there I would do so, not have it enforced...but as what was mentioned before it varies depending on your location - whether this is in terms of the victim or the publisher I'm still not entirely sure

  15. #65
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think the biggest concern is the "caching" aspect...

    Once something is cached, you can never be fully sure you've erased all the traces.

    So say the political climate changed seriously in a negative manner sometime in our lifetime, and we all changed our minds about what we wanted published... it is too late to be making that decision then. Multiple copies will exist such that it will be very hard to ensure something is really "gone" when deleted.

    So you can tackle the person who posted something, and hopefully get them to take it down, but you can't remove it from the public domain fully since Google & Waybackmachine (and who knows what government agencies and others!) etc will all have cached copies of it.

    I'm sure there will probably be no reason to worry, now or in the future, but using common sense is just wise.

    Mike

  16. #66
    SQL Consultant gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy
    r937's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    39,250
    Mentioned
    59 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by xpcomputers View Post
    ...and who knows what government agencies
    like the library of congress

    i'm in ur interwebs, archivin ur tweets

    rudy.ca | @rudydotca
    Buy my SitePoint book: Simply SQL
    "giving out my real stuffs"

  17. #67
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by php_daemon View Post
    Yes, it's what you do with that publicity that matters. Turning bad publicity around with all the attention to your favour is an art.
    I've not done too badly from my mistakes in the past, and I'm sure it's always been down to my blatant lack of caring for privacy... no-ones perfect and how I see it, if I'm open about myself all the time, it ensures there's no skeletons in my closet and it allows people to avoid making assumptions based on circumstance.

    Quote Originally Posted by SiberianHuskey View Post
    You can have some control over your information that you post online, there are many people who I have Google and I can't find nothing on them so it's not true that you can find out about everyone, mostly those who are active and open online or younger folk who seem so free spirited to post anything and everything and then wonder or will wonder why it's going to come back and haunt them.
    Wrong answer, just because it's not blatantly visible on Google doesn't mean you can't find things out about them... you can take my word for it that there are people in the world who could quite easily find out anything about anyone using just the Internet... whether it's legal or not is another thing but your information is never safe. The only way to cover your tracks online is to not browse the web at all (a security expert told me this).

    Quote Originally Posted by mizwizzy View Post
    Is it not illegal for someone to take a picture of you like that and post it on the web without your permission?
    Eastern nations tend to have more of a problem with this, but in most countries it's generally accepted that you can take photos of anyone you like, however you can't publish, sell or license them for financial gain without their written or verbal permission, if they pertain to illegal activities (as in you're showing off your criminal prowess), put someone's life or property in danger as a result (this includes military bases), or if it's of children or vulnerable adults (without their guardian or advocates express written consent). Oh and if they ask you to remove the picture when you take it, you're obligated to remove it (unless your taking it as proof of a crime or something like that) - or ensure their identity is indistinguishable (facial / potentially distinguishable character blurring)... it's all pretty complex!

  18. #68
    SitePoint Wizard ryanhellyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    Eastern nations tend to have more of a problem with this, but in most countries it's generally accepted that you can take photos of anyone you like ...
    The location and nature of the photo is very important in most countries too. Taking a photo of someone naked on a beach and posting it online may be okay, but taking a photo of them through their window at their home is usually not.

  19. #69
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Usually not? When can you justifiably take a photo through someone's window of them (possibly naked)

  20. #70
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,276
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    When can you justifiably take a photo through someone's window of them (possibly naked)
    When you're somewhere where there are no laws against it.

    When I worked for the postal service, the girls were passing around a PlayGirl (yes, the mail gets read) because some movie star was naked in his own (holiday?) house and photographers got photos of him through windows and on the balcony. I do know they got published, because I saw them, and no, I don't know if he sued or whatever, but who cares, by then it's too late and there are a bazillion copies everywhere.

  21. #71
    SitePoint Wizard siteguru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,629
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    <snip>but in most countries it's generally accepted that you can take photos of anyone you like, however you can't publish, sell or license them for financial gain without their written or verbal permission, if they pertain to illegal activities (as in you're showing off your criminal prowess), put someone's life or property in danger as a result (this includes military bases), or if it's of children or vulnerable adults (without their guardian or advocates express written consent). Oh and if they ask you to remove the picture when you take it, you're obligated to remove it </snip>
    In the UK the laws of copyright apply. As long as the photo was taken IN a public place, and OF a public place (e.g. standing on a pavement is IN a public place, but photographing someone through their window in not OF a public place )then the photographer retains the copyright of the picture and can do with it as he/she pleases (provided such use does not contravene another piece of legislation, such as defamation or libel).

    Not being allowed to take photos of children or vulnerable adults is also a misconception - as is their right to get you to delete it. Even the police have this misconception. Whilst most people would happily delete such photos on request, they are under no legal obligation to do so - this is common question in newspapers (e.g. to their Consumer Justice sections) and the answer has always been as I describe above.

    Of course this is just the UK - it almost certainly differs elsewhere.

    Edit: The text below is extracted from a site I created for a client (the site is now defunct). This maybe helps put clearer words around what I say above.

    Photographic Copyright, a Guide

    It is very important for both the photographer and client to understand the legal position on how and when images that have been taken can be used after the commission.

    When you commission a professional photographer to take some pictures you are entering a legally binding contract, with rights and responsibilities applicable to both parties. One important aspect of this contract concerns copyright of the images made. It is perceived by many clients that all rights to the image or images stay with them. This is in fact not the case, and hasn't been for many years. The law on copyright changed fundamentally with the passing of the Copyright, Designs & Patent Act 1988. Prior to this Act the person or company who commissioned the photography owned the copyright to the work.

    The position was reversed with the introduction of the 1988 Act as it granted photographers the same rights as musicians, painters and other creative individuals. The copyright of the photograph now belongs to the person who took it. There is an exception when a photographer is employed by their company and in this case the company owns the rights to the photographs. It is possible for the company to waive this right if it has been negotiated into the contract of employment.

    The copyright lasts for 70 years after the end of the year in which the author dies. It offers protection against unauthorised reproduction of the photographs and entitles the owner to economic benefit from it. The act also extends some moral rights to the photographer which include the right not to have it falsely attributed, and the right not to have the work subjected to derogatory treatment.

    In reality this means that clients may only use any photographs taken by the professional photographer as per the terms agreed at the time they were commissioned. Any modification to these terms must be sought and agreed from the photographer and additional fees agreed as appropriate.

    For this reason it is essential that clients specify (preferably in writing) the uses to which images will be used when briefing the photographer and requesting a quotation. This agreement then forms part of the contract. It should cover how the work will be used, where (geographically) it will be used and for how long it will be used.

    Ultimately, it is in the interests of everyone to have a clear understanding of what has been agreed, so that there is no confusion if any subsequent issue arises.
    Ian Anderson
    www.siteguru.co.uk

  22. #72
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,276
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    ^ It's australia who's getting weird about photos of kids in public. People are so terrified of pedo's having pics of kids, anyone with a camera seen anywhere where there might happen to be a kid might get their face and camera smashed in.

    I should stop reading the news : (

  23. #73
    SitePoint Wizard ryanhellyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2,323
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    When can you justifiably take a photo through someone's window of them (possibly naked)
    When you are a in country which doesn't have privacy laws or if you have permission.

  24. #74
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    siteguru, I should have worded my comments better. When I stated "it's generally accepted" I was denoting that as a best practice rather than a legal requirement (I know people who despite the laws have been hassled by the authorities on taking pictures their legally entitled too - hence why I didn't specifically quote them).

  25. #75
    #titanic {float:none} silver trophy
    molona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    from Madrid to Heaven
    Posts
    8,221
    Mentioned
    237 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Well, I am not the only "molona" on the net and that's reflected on the results... furthermore if you think that molona is also an adjective, and not only a name.

    Regarding my real name, the first result is my twitter account which I rarely use


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •