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  1. #1
    Mad Beach Bum jgsketch's Avatar
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    Importance of C - Class IPs

    I'm trying to wrap my head around the whole c class issue and trying to figure out just how much negative value Google sees if any when you have links coming from the same c class.

    This is where my delima is. The C octet can have a maximum of 255 different numbers. So once I hit that many links, I'm going to start to have links from the same c class. I've found no information on how Google might handle this.

    I approach link building a little differently anyway. For my higher value links, I make sure the A and B classes have some range in between repeating c classes. If I'm not entirely sure, I'll check that they are not from the same hosting company.

    There bounds to be repeats though, naturally. So I've always considered the multiple c-class issue to not carry that much negative weight.

    Your thoughts.

  2. #2
    Follow Me On Twitter: @djg gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy Dan Grossman's Avatar
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    The purpose of this strategy is to trick Google into thinking the sites are owned by different people to give higher value to the links. It's based on a patent that was published half a decade ago (meaning it was written years before that), and isn't something anyone really does anymore.

    Google is an ICANN-accredited domain registrar and has full access to the WHOIS database.

    Google knows who's the registrant of every domain, and what name servers the domain is using. Google knows your sites have the same owner even if they're on different IPs.

    You're wasting your time, and you're not going to get anyone to allocate you hundreds of IP addresses anyway, let alone in hundreds of different ranges. There are not going to be any IP addresses left within 12-18 months, ARIN/RIPE/APNIC don't give out IPs without proper justification, and SEO is not a proper justification.

    So much of the web hosts with the same large hosting companies anyway that two sites being within the same class C range of IP addresses does not mean they are owned by the same person.

  3. #3
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    There are even many instances where hundreds of sites share the same IP address that are each owned by different people and where the search engines know that any links between them are no different from any other links between sites owned by different people.
    Stephen J Chapman

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  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy hooperman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Grossman View Post
    Google is an ICANN-accredited domain registrar and has full access to the WHOIS database.

    Google knows who's the registrant of every domain, and what name servers the domain is using. Google knows your sites have the same owner even if they're on different IPs.
    Google has access to the same public WHOIS records that you and I have access to. Domain privacy can hide the registrants identity, although some details are available, like registrar, nameservers etc.

    So, doesn't domain privacy hide registrant details from Google?

    EDIT: I know they have access to registrant details for domains they handle, but from others they are blocked in the same way that we are.

  5. #5
    phpLD Fanatic bronze trophy dvduval's Avatar
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    One question that I would ask after someone asks this question is why do you need that many websites? I personally have about 125 websites, and 6 different hosting accounts, yet 97&#37; of my traffic comes through 2 websites, each with their own IP. I tried making lots of websites starting in 2002 or so, and while I did make some short term profits, in the end I ended up making 98% of my money from just a few websites, and I really don't think the IP address played any role in any of this.

  6. #6
    Mad Beach Bum jgsketch's Avatar
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    @dvduval, I'm not looking to have that many websites. I was talking about the number of backlinks to my one site.

    I do make look at the whois when I do link building to see what the names are. But sometimes I will run across a domainer that has 100,000's of sites and he has about 20 sites that I could get a link on. This is when I get worried. Even though the C-Class's are different the name is the same in the Whois.

  7. #7
    Follow Me On Twitter: @djg gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy Dan Grossman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hooperman View Post
    So, doesn't domain privacy hide registrant details from Google?

    EDIT: I know they have access to registrant details for domains they handle, but from others they are blocked in the same way that we are.
    It does. There is no such thing as private registration, in terms of how DNS works. When you buy private registration you're really not the owner of the domain, you're signing an agreement with the privacy company to buy the domain in their name (which is what will be in the WHOIS) and the agreement grants you control of the domain for the term of the registration. *Effectively* it's yours but *technically* it's not.

    Since it's really the privacy company's domain, Google and other registrars don't have access to who is controlling it, because it's really not yours, they have no right to demand the privacy company talk about why they registered a particular domain.

    But anyone can see that some set of domains resolve to the same IP address regardless of what's on the WHOIS.

  8. #8
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    C Class IPs are valuable if you are selling links on your sites. This means one site can get links from all your sites if they have different C Class IPs. Having them all from one IP shows Google that it is created by one person making the backlinks counted as one.
    "You only fail if you quit trying"

  9. #9
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by airabongco View Post
    C Class IPs are valuable if you are selling links on your sites. This means one site can get links from all your sites if they have different C Class IPs. Having them all from one IP shows Google that it is created by one person making the backlinks counted as one.
    Did you read the thread before posting? As the thread explains the IP address is totally irrelevant to SEO and you have just contradicted all of what a number of people have said without providing any proof that you are right and everyone else is wrong.

    Since the number of people owning web sites far exceeds the number of available IPv4 addresses it is obvious that the same IP address can be used by many different independently owned sites and is therefore irrelevant - particularly since Google has access to the registration details of all the domains to see who owns what.

    Now when IPv6 takes over then what you said may then be true but then everyone will be able to have several thousand IP addresses of their own once that is introduced and there will be no such thing as a class C IP.

    The only relevance of Class C now is with addresses in the 192.168 range reserved for private class C networks. Outside of the private networks the IP address is irrelevant unless being used to identify the web hosting provider or ISP.
    Stephen J Chapman

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  10. #10
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    Google knows who's the registrant of every domain, and what name servers the domain is using. Google knows your sites have the same owner even if they're on different IPs.

  11. #11
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    I also have one query related to this class C, what about hundreds of directories powered by phpLinkDirectory where we submit our website have all same class C, it seems yes as I checked few. So how does this impact your SEO and link building for a website when we blindly submit to all the directories found in big directories. Is this submission whit hat SEO???
    http://www.open-source-development.com/

    Rakhi Chowdhary is a SEO expert having relevant SEO experience.

  12. #12
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    Actually I never apply this on searching resources,...choosing related site is much important to me.

  13. #13
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    The ONLY place where class C networks even exist any more is within the 192.168 range where it allows you to set up multiple separate private networks. Any addresses on the internet itself do not belong to a class A, B, or C network at all.
    Stephen J Chapman

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  14. #14
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    Dan Grossman is right. Matt Cutts specifically talks about this myth. http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/myth-b...-ip-addresses/


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