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  1. #1
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    difference between SQL and MySQL

    from what i gather right now, there is none..am i correct? or is there a difference..or is MySQL just a branch off of SQL, sort of -- a second form?
    InQuE

  2. #2
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    MySql is a database server whilst SQL is the standard language that developers use to access the data in a database such as 'SELECT * FROM Employees', so they are not comparable.

  3. #3
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    oh, ok, but then why are there so many different types of SQL, like MSSQL, MySQL, __SQL etc etc..
    InQuE

  4. #4
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    SQL (oft' pronounced Sequel) stands for Structured Query Language. It allows developers or programmers to pose complex questions of a database through some relatively simple commands.

    SQL has commands to create tables, to add records, to delete records and to change the value of fields of existing records. You can specify read and write permissions for other users, commit and roll back transactions, add and delete fields from existing tables, specify indexes and create views. Lots of fun stuff

    But it also provides a means of creating databases, whether they are MSSQL, MySQL, Oracle and so forth. Out of these, MSSQL and MySQL are most popular for the common developer. MSSQL (and its little brother, Access) run solely on Windows boxes, whereas MySQL is platform-independent and can run on Windows, Unix, Linux, etc. MySQL is also open source, meaning the code is freely available for anyone to tweak. MSSQL is a Microsoft-only product and while quite powerful, runs a close second to MySQL in my opinion.

    geof

  5. #5
    SitePoint Wizard Goof's Avatar
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    SQL is a language; MSSQL, Access, and MySQL are database formats.

    So SQL looks like this:
    Code:
    SELECT MyData FROM MyTable WHERE ThisValue=ThatValue ORDER BY WhatIsImportant;
    Where MSSQL, Access, and MySQL look like this:
    <open any of the above files with notepad - yes, it will look like garbage>

    So SQL is a language and MySQL, MSSQL, Access, etc. are files which store data.

    As you can see, the one has virtually nothing to do with the other (except that you can use SQL statements to manipulate data in MS/MySQL databases).

    Hope that helps,
    Goof
    Nathan Rutman
    A slightly offbeat creative.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
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    Originally posted by Geof Harries
    MSSQL is a Microsoft-only product and while quite powerful, runs a close second to MySQL in my opinion.
    I would disagree, mainly because I write enterprise level applications. MySQL is not fit for these. It has great strengths as a web-database, however databases are used for much more than websites.

    While MySQL has come leaps and bounds, it still isn't a high-end database server like Oracle, SQL Server, Sybase, etc.
    SVP Marketing, SoCast SRM
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    Twitter: @jeremywright

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by Jeremy W.


    I would disagree, mainly because I write enterprise level applications. MySQL is not fit for these. It has great strengths as a web-database, however databases are used for much more than websites.

    While MySQL has come leaps and bounds, it still isn't a high-end database server like Oracle, SQL Server, Sybase, etc.
    SQL as explained above is a non-procedural language. It doesn't do anything but give instructions (Select this, Update that..etc). mySQL, DB2, Sybase, in technical terms, are all DBMS (Database Management System), in fact, I believe they are all RDBMS (Relational DBMS)!

    Though my experiences have been limited, I agree with Jeremy. You will not find mySQL present in many corporate environments (acting as the DBMS backbone).

  8. #8
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    oh. im starting to catch on herer ok..
    ok, so MySQL and such are DBMS, that i get, so if i wanted to intergrate my WINNT network so that users who store info with WINNT, can call it later on their own home computer (kinda like those online-briefcases things) with a uname/pass system, which would be better MySQL, MSSQL, or Access. I think the user has direct access to storage when they are connected via WINNT system
    InQuE

  9. #9
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
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    If you are on an NT network, I would say SQL Server would be far and away the best, however it is also the most expensive of the two. Access isn't really worth considering if this is something people are actually going to use, so if you want a free database I would recommend MySQL, PostgreSQL or Interbase
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  10. #10
    Yugo full of anvils bronze trophy hillsy's Avatar
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    I could actually see Access being a reasonable fit for a "briefcase" kind of application, because it doesn't require a a database server. You've got one file, you interact with it using ODBC, then you sync your changes back to your production copy. AFAIK, you can't do that with MSSQL (correct me if I'm wrong).

    I definitely wouldn't want to build the whole system in Access though Maybe keep the master copy on a "real" database server and have a whole bunch of Access clients that periodically connect to it.

    I suspect you could also do this in Interbase. But don't quote me on that.
    that's me!
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