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  1. #26
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennypitts View Post
    Sorry, I had to point out that you made me laugh. I too struggle with Dyslexia, but am proud to say it has not been an impediment for my success!!!
    Me either! Of all things I've become a published author. Not bad for someone with awful spelling and grammatical skills (my copy editors had some sleepless nights)

  2. #27
    SitePoint Enthusiast sushie93's Avatar
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    Freelancer.com , Odesk, Digital Point, Warrior Forum.
    If you are afraid of not being paid by some employees of Freelancer.com, only work with people who have already get good reviews.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Member KonaGirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jennypitts View Post
    I do, usually these sites will charge the person winning the project bid a percentage from the project cost. More often than not, the employer places the money in an escrow (I think it is the safest way for both parties), then once the project is completed the escrow is released and the employee gets paid. The person can then transfer the funds to their paypal account.



    I have to AGREE that GAF is overcrowded with people looking for bargain jobs. I often feel like I am at a fleamarket when I am there. Although I have found quality workers, the VAST MAJORITY, are full of it. They talk the talk but can't walk the walk.



    Sorry, I had to point out that you made me laugh. I too struggle with Dyslexia, but am proud to say it has not been an impediment for my success!!!
    Using the escrow account is an excellent point. It is something that everyone involved in the flame throwing forgot to mention and I too had forgotten about. Glad you brought it up.

    Taking the risk of also being attacked I am compelled to say this. One thing that I always thought was pretty great about a forum was that we could be ourselves, pretty much, without having to worry too much about our "correct" grammar and could use colloquialisms without being attacked for lacking in the "King's English". Granted it is often difficult to understand someone that is not born to speaking English, but nitpicking over a few words, typo errors or Dyslexia is well, just nitpicking.

    Sometimes it just becomes such an irritant when an attack gets made in reference to someones English, typing or whatever skills, it just makes me think to myself...lighten up people .... is this the only thing in life that is bothering you? If that is it, please pick up a newspaper and find something else to be upset about. There is a lot out there.

    Jenny, thanks for your post as yes, it is a chuckle!

    Out of all this flack, I hope that Colocated was actually able to glean something useful from the conversation and not end out more confused than ever.

  4. #29
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    The task of content writing as a freelance writer is today's world's one of the most sought after jobs. Due to its open nature, people tend to look into various websites like odesk, getafreelancer.com and so on with a view to manage themselves good content writing jobs.

  5. #30
    SitePoint Member jackbusch's Avatar
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    As someone who works fulltime as a freelance writer, I recommend what KonaGirl suggested. Set up your website and market yourself like a business. I have never worked on oDesk, elance, GetaFreelancer or anything like that. All my contracts have been through private contacts, referrals and through job boards like Craigslist. I've been lucky enough to get ripped off yet, but that's just a matter of judging whether or not you can trust a client or not which is a whole other ball game.

    As for finding jobs, I recommend http://www.freelancewritinggigs.com/, ProBlogger and Media Bistro as resources.

  6. #31
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    Payperpost.com
    Bloggerwave.com
    Smorty.com
    ReviewMe.com
    SponsoredReviews.com
    BlogsVertise.com
    PayU2Blog.com
    CreamAid.com
    LinkWorth.com
    InBlogAds.com
    DewittsMedia.com
    LinkyLoveArmy.com
    PayMeToBlogAboutYou.com
    BlogChex.com
    LoudLaunch.com
    Blogitive.com
    BloggingAds.com
    Contextual.v7n.com


    check those out

  7. #32
    SitePoint Member KonaGirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackbusch View Post
    As someone who works fulltime as a freelance writer, I recommend what KonaGirl suggested. Set up your website and market yourself like a business. I have never worked on oDesk, elance, GetaFreelancer or anything like that. All my contracts have been through private contacts, referrals and through job boards like Craigslist. I've been lucky enough to get ripped off yet, but that's just a matter of judging whether or not you can trust a client or not which is a whole other ball game.

    As for finding jobs, I recommend http://www.freelancewritinggigs.com/, ProBlogger and Media Bistro as resources.
    Another place that is good for advertising, besides CraigsList, once your website is built is:
    http://www.usfreeads.com/

    You can place ads for free and Google actually loves the ads posted on the site well enough to index them. There is an upgrade for $9.95 for a years subscription that I do highly recommend as it gives you so much more of an advantage with your ads. However, if it is not affordable at this time, do take advantage of the free option to advertise your services.

  8. #33
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    Having read through this thread and enjoyed the hilarious grammatical nitpicking I think I must agree with most people. The contract sites mentioned like rentafreelancer, rentacoder, odesk, etc are all sites that I would only consider using to purchase content that I was quite prepared to outsource to India or Pakistan for example. From my experience of the sites, the competition on price is absolute and unless you're willing to compete solely on price with someone from the other side of the world whose costbase is non-comparable with western life and value, then you won't succeed.

  9. #34
    SitePoint Enthusiast Colocated's Avatar
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    Hello friends, i tried working on Freelancer.com and unfortunately I have to say that my experience was dreadful. First I struggled a lot on how get bids for projects and when finally I got through the requirements of the employee were ridiculous.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charismatic View Post
    I don't recommend the freelance website, they are full of fraund buyers, who mostly donot pay after work and flee like a rat after the completion of work. Market yourself personally.
    There is such a thing as escrow or milestone payment as freelancer.com is fond of calling it. You want to get paid, use the milestone, simple as that. There are a lot of good buyers at freelancer.com and you can easily recognized them. You don't want the buyer to rip you? Then don't give him any chance to do it, simple as that!

  11. #36
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    I know this post is kind of old, but I see the OP responded recently.

    I work as a freelance writer. I browsed through the old posts and I do what many people also suggested. I write for others for pay and I also have my own websites and blogs that generate income. I like to mix it up. My days are usually spent half and half. Income from a personal blog can sometimes be spotty when you first get started; therefore, having paying clients in nice for steady income.

    I got my started doing projects on Rent a Coder. I believe it is now Vworker. I haven't been back there in a long time. I always liked Rent a Coder because they did escrow so as long as you did the work and could show it, you would get paid.

    While it is technically against their rules (they want you to keep using the site for your protection and so they can generate money from fees) if anyone wanted me to do another project, I would ask them to email me and then start working off the site. This meant I retained more of my money.

    I am still working with a client I met there about 1 1/2 years ago. A few clients just ran out of work for me to do, but I worked for one for 2 years and another for a year with steady work each week.

    So even those bidding sites have the potential to lead to long-term gigs. Just be sure to leave a "please let me know if you need additional article written." message after uploading a project to these sites.

    Good luck! It took me about 6 months before I was able to get into a good groove with steady pay and clients, but it was worth it!

  12. #37
    SitePoint Enthusiast sparkie2260's Avatar
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    As a writer for one of the freelancing sites above, I've had nothing but good luck. As an employer for one of them, my experience has been mixed. Part of that may have been my own fault; I was hasty and wasn't watching my back close enough. (One employee went out and subcontracted the work to another, less qualified, writer on the same site.) No matter you break into the market, and then build up your workload and portfolio, it will take time. I have previously posted that my very first writing job paid $2500. But that was not the norm for the first several months.


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