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  1. #1
    One website at a time mmj's Avatar
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    Page views per unique

    G'day!

    Depending on what your site is, you'd either want a high number of page views per unique, or a low number.

    But then again, you could say a high number is always better.

    For content sites, a high number of page views per unique would allow you to show the visitor a number of different advertisements for different networks during their visit, HOWEVER, their CTR might be lower.

    For ecommerce sites, a high number of page views per unique could indicate that your visitor is BROWSING through DIFFERENT products.

    In any case, a high number of page views per unique visitor is an indication that your visitors are finding your site worth reading, and that the front page hasn't put them off!

    What do YOU think?
    [mmj] My magic jigsaw
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  2. #2
    SitePoint Zealot lightwithoutheat's Avatar
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    I think in ANY case a high number of views is good because the customer is seeing more of your product that you're trying to sell. But it all comes down to a matter of perspective. It also depends on how long they are spending on each item as well.

  3. #3
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    I'd rather have more uniques and less page views for a content site. Advertisers pay more per unique than per page view.

    However more page views does indicate a good site, it means people like your site or find it useful, but it isn't that good for advertisers.
    Chris Beasley - I publish content and ecommerce sites.
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  4. #4
    SitePoint Addict jbradley's Avatar
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    I'd also say that a higher number of page views would be better, in particular because your visitors are at least hanging around long enough to look at more than just your index page, which means that they're somewhat interested in your product or service.

    Just my $0.02...

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  5. #5
    Sports Publisher mjames's Avatar
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    Originally posted by aspen
    I'd rather have more uniques and less page views for a content site. Advertisers pay more per unique than per page view.

    However more page views does indicate a good site, it means people like your site or find it useful, but it isn't that good for advertisers.
    Very true -- from a business perspective, more money comes out of more unique visitors. But from a marketers perspective, more page views indicates visitors are exploring your site and it is more worthwhile, which I think is the ultimate goal.

    On my site, I get about 1:3 ratio from uniques to page views.

  6. #6
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    If you have 200,000 total impressions from an ad point of view if 50,000 were uniques it'd be much better than if 10,000 were uniques.

    However 1,000,000 impressions with 50,000 uniques is much better than 200,000 impressions with 50,000 uniques.

    So its relative.

    Instead of looking at ratios you should look at it like this:

    Each unique is worth lets say $1, each extra page view is worth lets say 33 cents.
    Chris Beasley - I publish content and ecommerce sites.
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  7. #7
    One website at a time mmj's Avatar
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    Originally posted by aspen
    I'd rather have more uniques and less page views for a content site. Advertisers pay more per unique than per page view.
    Yes, that is very true, but only if you have only one advertiser.

    For instance, if one visitors has 6 page views, and you rotate your ads randomly, then that visitor may see ads for about 3 different advertisers. To each advertiser it's a unique visitor. This in no way reduces the effectiveness for the advertisers, because the visitor is not seeing the same ad.

    So if you have an exclusivity agreement with one advertiser, which I think Chris does, then his argument is quite valid and it's good to concentrate on unique visitors more than page views. Otherwise, the argument doesn't necessarily apply and I would say it's good have many page views, and to rotate your ads between many advertisers.
    Last edited by mmj; Jun 27, 2002 at 22:28.
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  8. #8
    SitePoint Addict w3exit's Avatar
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    at the end of the day .. it's the bottoml$ne that counts

  9. #9
    SitePoint Enthusiast Roxy's Avatar
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    Just a quote from marketing-terms:
    "Recently introduced by the online unit of the New York Times, the "surround session" is creating a major buzz in the online advertising community. The session model represents a potentially significant shift in the way advertisers view online media, as more emphasis is placed on the real interaction between advertisers and audiences.

    In a surround session, an advertiser has all or most of the ads on each page for a visitor's entire site visit. As the visitor moves from page to page, the same advertiser is represented in various ad placements. This could allow for reinforcement of an advertiser's message, or possibly the creative use of a story line across several pages."


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