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  1. #26
    From space with love silver trophy
    SpacePhoenix's Avatar
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    I'd say that having the files in the file system makes them easier to recover and restore, as there are a number of programs that you can use. If your database and files are on the same disk and that disk fails you'll loose all no matter what way you store the files.

    Depending on the size and number of files by storing them in the database you are limiting your options for storage medium for backups to hard drives. If you store themn in the file system you have the option of optical disks (DVD, Blueray).

    What would you do with database stored files if some hacker got into the database and deleted it all, you would looks the files, if they are stored in the file system then you would just need to run the appropriate script to "re-index" them.
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  2. #27
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    Yes, file recovery is a nice option. Then again, this stuff should be living on SANs and/or RAID5+ storage where risk of hardware failure is minimal presuming operators aren't sleeping on the job. I'd argue it is easier to worry about a single-file recovery scenario (eg--a single db backup) than grabbing hundreds or thousands of files and making sure you have them and they are in the right place with the right permissions.

    Blueray holds plenty of data. If you are kicking around 50+ gb databases, you probably aren't backing up to optical media due to speed constraints.

    If your box got that compromised, you should really be building a new de-novo box. Also, a database restore is much more reliable than file system recoveries. With proper transaction logging, you can often even restore things to a specified point in time too.

  3. #28
    From space with love silver trophy
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    I just found this thread about it. A good test if someone has the time to test it would be to take 2,000 image files, store 1,000 of them in a BLOB field in one table and store the other 1,000 in the file system (with filename, MIME etc stored in the table) and then for each table time how long it takes to display the 1,000 files. The display of the files should be done about 15-20 times for each method to get an average for the time taken to display the files.

    When you google around it seems like the storage of files in BLOBs is one of them situations where you either absolutely love it or absolutely hate it, there doesn't seen to be too much middle ground.
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  4. #29
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
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    Yeah, this is definitely a war of religion. Things seem to be civil here, so we might as well continue.

    Interesting experiment, but I'd ask "does it matter?" as well as "are you measuring the important part?"

    For most scenarios, pulling from either source will be fast enough, the real bottleneck usually being the WAN connection between client and web server, not anything that might or might not be happening on the server. Now, the trouble you can run into is that, if you are pulling large blobs out of your DB all the time either the web server or the db server can choke on this. Trick is, if you are managing this in your application, you can employ a variety of caching strategies within your application to ease that bottleneck and still keep the management advantages of database-based storage.

  5. #30
    SitePoint Enthusiast technov5's Avatar
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    sorry for the late reply, have a lot of work these days.

    Thanks for all the help, I learned a lot from them. I guess it comes down to what I am storing and my application, so I think i'll have to test it with some sample data.

    I'll make sure to post the results when I am done.

    And thanks a lot for all the help, please feel free to say anything else.

    THank You
    I am back, with new designs.


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