SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    France
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question Structured Learning

    So far I have dipped into reference material when the need arose and I have managed to create some simple web sites with little/no knowledge of the underlying code, by using builders. I have some non-professional programming experience and I am superficially familiar with (elderly) HTML, but I have no knowledge of CSS. On a whim I bought "Simply JavaScript" and I have been impressed with the ideal of structuring future efforts from the ground up and so I think that "BYO Web Site the Right Way" will satisfactorily plug the gaps in my self education. However, I think I would like to progress to PHP/MySQL in the future and I have a competitor volume on the subject, but I wonder how well SitePoint titles dovetail together in order to achieve 'structured learning' ? In general, it is easy to pick books by title but they rarely seem to progress through a large subject seamlessly. Surely a seamless progression of mutually aware titles from one publishing house promotes loyalty to that house ? I would appreciate advice on the ideal map.

    Dave

  2. #2
    SitePoint Enthusiast aksival's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Posts
    37
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree that a "Learning Web Design/Development from Beginner to Advanced" would be helpful. In my experience, your best bet is to start simple and take progress at your own pace. My suggestion would be this:

    Learn HTML. Master it. Embrace it. Don't worry so much about making it look pretty, just get the structure down.

    Learn CSS. Learn how to make things pretty. Get good at it. For practice, markup a document from scratch and try to get it to look like a website that already exists. Don't bother looking at their code...try to do it all yourself and you'll learn it faster.

    Learn JavaScript. Now that you know how HTML and CSS work, study DOM concepts and play around with basic JavaScript. Many people can't stand a huge dose of vanilla JS, so if you learn the basics and go with something like jQuery you'll be just fine.

    Now that you know how to create, style, and control HTML documents, move on to PHP. Start using includes and creating parts of your pages dynamically. Once you get a grasp of this, move on to more advanced things, including database interaction.

    After you get a good understanding of all of the above, tinker with AJAX a bit. It's nothing more than this: JavaScript + PHP (or w/e language) + DOM manipulation.

    A "good" developer will tell you it takes years to master all of this. It's taken me many, but if you have a passion for it it's well worth the time. Anyways, I hope this helps give you a bit of direction.

  3. #3
    #titanic {float:none} silver trophy
    molona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    from Madrid to Heaven
    Posts
    8,025
    Mentioned
    211 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    SitePoint indicates if the book is for begginers, medium or advanced users.

    Their book matrix does not only indicate the level of expertise but the order and structure followed by most of the web developers.

    http://www.sitepoint.com/books/library/

    Have a look yourself and see if it answers your question

  4. #4
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    France
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smile

    Thanks AKSIVAL and MOLONA. I think my question has been answered as comprehensively as it could be. I don't quite know how I missed that web page !

  5. #5
    #titanic {float:none} silver trophy
    molona's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    from Madrid to Heaven
    Posts
    8,025
    Mentioned
    211 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Don't worry, it happens to the best of us

    You're welcome and glad that I could be of help

  6. #6
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I would also say that most publishers have a "process" for people wanting to learn how to build websites, generally the applied method is HTML > CSS > JavaScript > PHP + mySQL as this is recognised as Structure > Style > Behaviour (Local) > Behaviour (Remote). This seems to be a common problem in web design, there's so many language specific books (and generic beginner books), there isn't currently a "pathway" book which underlines the process of learning and the skills you need to undertake (along with the additional skills you will need beyond a language like accessibility and usability). SitePoint does have a good collection though


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •