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  1. #1
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    Landscape photography

    What are your views on landscape photography? Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by raena; Nov 12, 2009 at 19:09. Reason: Plagiarised text is not welcome here and has been removed. Grrrrrrr!

  2. #2
    whagwan? silver trophybronze trophy akritic's Avatar
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    Well, it might be easy to point your camera at a scene and click to get a decent shot, but composition is everything with landscape.

    The most important skill required to be a good photographer is to think before you take the shot. I still forget to do this sometimes when wrapped up in scouting for interesting things to shoot.

  3. #3
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    I would say that landscapes are more difficult to shoot then portraits... it's very easy to take a good landscape photo but that also means that taking one which actually stands out beyond the others is extremely tricky, after all anyone can find a pretty landscape and come out with another lovely photo... but getting an exceptional one which has a quality to it that is beyond the usual "pixel perfect" look is much harder (IMO).

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    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy asp_funda's Avatar
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by armchaircritic View Post
    The most important skill required to be a good photographer is to think before you take the shot. I still forget to do this sometimes when wrapped up in scouting for interesting things to shoot.
    Ah yes, that happens with me many times. And then later when I'm back home going through the photos I curse myself why didn't I think of taking a photo this way or that way, eh!
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  5. #5
    SitePoint Guru JoePrice's Avatar
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    Taking a really good landscape photo involves many factors in my opinion. Firstly, finding a great location is very important. Supporting that though is the time of day you're taking the photo. Often the best times to get a good shot could well be at anti-social times, e.g. dawn.

    Also having good equipment helps, if you've got a great wide-angle lens on a decent SLR camera, preferably full frame, on a tripod, you're maximising your chances of producing a quality landscape photo.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Member Gringo379's Avatar
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    some of the tips I could share for you
    1. used a tripod
    2.consider the sky
    3.capture moment
    4.use the weather

  7. #7
    I Love Licorice silver trophybronze trophy Datura's Avatar
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    Composition is the most important part of a really good photo, that includes landscape photos. There should be three layers at least:

    Fore-ground
    Middle-ground
    Back-ground/Distance

    The weight of the elements in a picture should be unequal. The elements should not be parallel nor should they be at 90 angles, unless a static image/expression is desired.

    The same rules that are followed in picture painting are applied in making pictures with the camera. Negative and positive spaces have to be pleasing shapes if culled out and viewed by themselves. There should be clarity, no muddling, no hiding. All elements that are visible should have enough "meat" to be explained. If there are snippets of something that are not explained then the photograph/picture is not well thought out (unless you want a treasure hunt )

    In contrast to painting where one can paint at any hour or any day, a photographer has to wait for the right moment to capture a mood. A painter can create the mood, a photographer has to have at least 50% of the mood in existence in order to show what he wants to.

    Coincidence can play a part, but really good pictures are planned. It might be that a moment of great light happens and the photographer/artist has to recognize this moment fast to capture it, but there should still be a calculated framing and so on. Just shooting snapshots can result in some arbitrary good shot, but planing gives more satisfying results.
    Ulrike
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  8. #8
    SitePoint Member Gringo379's Avatar
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    Datura here, is I guess a pro landscape photographer

  9. #9
    I Love Licorice silver trophybronze trophy Datura's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gringo379 View Post
    Datura here, is I guess a pro landscape photographer
    Well thanks

    But I really am a well trained all around artist, painter first. So I apply what I know from that medium to the other
    Ulrike
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  10. #10
    Keep Moving Forward gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy
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    Great post Datura!

    A useful rule of thumb with composition is the good ole Rule of Thirds.

    If you imagine your frame split up into a grid of thirds, try to line up something interesting where your thirds intersect. So with landscape photography, it can perhaps be a flower or a tree in the foreground, leaving the mountains and the sky receding into the back.

    The logic is to keep things off-centred, so that there's some tension in the photograph.

    For me, very few times is it interesting to have a symmetrical photograph. And worse yet when you have the one lonely subject flat bang in the middle with bare space all around. Yes, there are times when you'd want that effect, if you want to show isolation maybe, but most times it should be avoided.

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