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  1. #1
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    Python web app development

    Hi,

    We're in the process of designing our web app that will be built in a django framework & I guess im the digital marketing guy that wants to understand what the technical guys talk about a bit better.

    I've got a few questions that I was hoping you guys could he help me out with (you all come highly recommended)

    1. The front end of the site will be built in a php CMS pre-authentication & once you've logged in, your in the django engine. Can the site continue it's design theme/aesthetics post login? How flexible is Django's templating relevant to Modx? The front end site will be built in Modx & the actual app built & running in Django. Is this the best way to go about this? The front end is designed to educate & convert, the app's where the magic happens.

    2. Why is Djanngo/Python the recommended framework when it comes to web app development?

    3. Where can I read more about current web app development? I.e. standards, trends etc? What sites, blogs, specific articles should I be reading? I guess what I'm trying to say here is where/how can I shorten the skill gap in this area.

    4. How secure is Djano?

    5. What other frameworks are web apps built in?

    6. In terms of our app, we're starting with the UI's first, developing UI flows & screen mocks that we then had planned to have designed, sliced & built into django. The app is designed to serve as a niche marketplace for products & services (not creative). We're starting with the UI's first as this seems logical, however are we going about this the right way? When building web apps, is there a fairly standard design & development process/framework that we could be working to?

    I understand this may be really basic stuff for you guys, however your help here is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, Adam.

  2. #2
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    Some quick replies as I started reading so thought I'd comment:

    1. Not familiar with Django, but generally theming is easy to carry over for any web app.

    I'm not familiar with Modx either, but it looks like an established framework good for presentation, so it's just horses for courses really, your developers want to use that for presentation and Django as the engine, this seems fair enough to me.

    2. Established frameworks are good for keeping code understandable and maintainable by teams of developers. Generally speaking using a framework is a good idea. Django/Python is just one of the options, but developers are likely to have their own preferences. As long as enough developers know it, and you can find people that understand it, then it's ok to use.

    3. For blogs on applications in general, try:

    http://www.joelonsoftware.com/

    http://www.hanselman.com/blog/

    http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/

    4. Probably no less secure than anything else, although your developers need to be up on security issues.

    5. Lots! .net framework from Microsoft is popular, as is Smarty templates for PHP.

    6. When designing UI's I recommend Steve Krug's Don't Make Me Think, see:

    http://www.webref.eu/conversion-rate-optimisation.php

    I would take a look at the Joel On Software blog mentioned earlier and see what he has to say about the application development process, he is a very clued up guy.

    Rgds



    Quote Originally Posted by AdamLee View Post
    1. The front end of the site will be built in a php CMS pre-authentication & once you've logged in, your in the django engine. Can the site continue it's design theme/aesthetics post login? How flexible is Django's templating relevant to Modx? The front end site will be built in Modx & the actual app built & running in Django. Is this the best way to go about this? The front end is designed to educate & convert, the app's where the magic happens.

    2. Why is Djanngo/Python the recommended framework when it comes to web app development?

    3. Where can I read more about current web app development? I.e. standards, trends etc? What sites, blogs, specific articles should I be reading? I guess what I'm trying to say here is where/how can I shorten the skill gap in this area.

    4. How secure is Djano?

    5. What other frameworks are web apps built in?

    6. In terms of our app, we're starting with the UI's first, developing UI flows & screen mocks that we then had planned to have designed, sliced & built into django. The app is designed to serve as a niche marketplace for products & services (not creative). We're starting with the UI's first as this seems logical, however are we going about this the right way? When building web apps, is there a fairly standard design & development process/framework that we could be working to?

    I understand this may be really basic stuff for you guys, however your help here is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, Adam.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Zealot newspire's Avatar
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    1. All things being equal this does not sound like the "best" way to go. I would have to think there must be some compelling reason to do part of the site in php and part in django. Given the choice I would do all of it in django. It is capable of handling user account and logins.

    2. If your developers know python, django is the best choice. It's easy to learn and use. Django uses the DRY, Don't Repeat Yourself, principal. Django was built from the ground up to make development as fast as possible by not making the developer do things more than once.

    4. Django does many basic security task automatically, ie your developers can't forget to do them. For instance Django filters all user input for html/sql insertion.

    6. Django's templating is not very intrusive. It should be easy to take the site and add the Django templates in later.

  4. #4
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    Hi There,

    Thanks for the replies guys.

    I've just got a few q's (in red) on the last post below.

    Cheers.


    Quote Originally Posted by newspire View Post
    1. All things being equal this does not sound like the "best" way to go. I would have to think there must be some compelling reason to do part of the site in php and part in django. Given the choice I would do all of it in django. It is capable of handling user account and logins. what I meant by this was that the front end (not the app) would be built in MODx as it appears to be a lot more flexible as far as design aesthetics are concerned & as a CMS it also appears to be quite flexible. The idea here is to keep the front end lean, tight & easy to update. I'm just concerned that when I get the design PSD's back there could be some sort of constraints with building whats come back in PSD as a Django template. Am I wrong here?

    2. If your developers know python, django is the best choice. It's easy to learn and use. Django uses the DRY, Don't Repeat Yourself, principal. Django was built from the ground up to make development as fast as possible by not making the developer do things more than once.

    4. Django does many basic security task automatically, ie your developers can't forget to do them. For instance Django filters all user input for html/sql insertion.

    6. Django's templating is not very intrusive. It should be easy to take the site and add the Django templates in later.
    So starting with the UI flows & UI mockups is the right way to start building the app once the purpose of the app & surrounding operational gray area has been solved?


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