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  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast dineroking's Avatar
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    Question can you help me choose a camera....

    Hello,

    I'm looking to buy a good camera(s) that I can use for my web pictures/videos. I need people's opinion on what is a good camera for the job. I want to create a website that will have training videos and want to know what is a good quality cam for it. I have been looking at 2 options, either the Canon 5D Mark II (which has video) or the Canon 50D (for pictures) and a Canon HS10 (for the high quality video). Even though I'm looking at those options I would love to know what other people use or think is/are good camera(s) that produce good quality images and is web friendly.

    Also any recommendations on a good video editing software?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    You can visit this link
    pcmarketusadotcom / products . aspx ? category_ID=160
    to get every king of cameras.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Enthusiast dineroking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michal Right View Post
    You can visit this link

    to get every king of cameras.
    Well i appreciate the link, but what i really need is advice from people on what camera(s) i should pick.

  4. #4
    SitePoint Guru bronze trophy Slackr's Avatar
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    As far as the Canon 5D II goes you are smashing an ant with a mallet for web images. There is no doubt that the image quality will be stellar but it is likely excessive for your requirements. The video function/quality is no where near what you would get from any of the entry level camcorders. It is for all accounts more of a gimmick than actually useful if you are doing anything more than just recording a scene unfolding in front of you.

    I'd be seriously looking at a video camera if you are doing video tutorials of external activities. You will have much more flexibility and a tool that has been designed for that purpose. If you are doing software-based tutorials then there are dedicated software programmes for that too that won't require an external video camera.

    For product images you'll likely be well served by any of the major manufacturer's dSLR cameras right from the entry level up to the top level. I've been using a Canon 400D for years and all the images end up being scaled down and optimised before being placed on the internet anyway, so unless you need those same pictures for catalogues or print advertising you'll be well covered. (Even if you do need high resolution pictures any of these same cameras would suffice.)

    As for software I'm sure other Windows users will chime in but I'm a mac person myself. The basic iMovie, iDVD products will likely cover everything you want to do right out of the box without the fuss or big price tags. I've worked on many promo videos, presentations and haven't had to move past those tools yet. They're designed to be easy to use but their simplicity shouldn't be confused with being simplistic, there's nothing wrong with the quality.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Enthusiast dineroking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackr View Post
    As far as the Canon 5D II goes you are smashing an ant with a mallet for web images. There is no doubt that the image quality will be stellar but it is likely excessive for your requirements. The video function/quality is no where near what you would get from any of the entry level camcorders. It is for all accounts more of a gimmick than actually useful if you are doing anything more than just recording a scene unfolding in front of you.

    I'd be seriously looking at a video camera if you are doing video tutorials of external activities. You will have much more flexibility and a tool that has been designed for that purpose. If you are doing software-based tutorials then there are dedicated software programmes for that too that won't require an external video camera.

    For product images you'll likely be well served by any of the major manufacturer's dSLR cameras right from the entry level up to the top level. I've been using a Canon 400D for years and all the images end up being scaled down and optimised before being placed on the internet anyway, so unless you need those same pictures for catalogues or print advertising you'll be well covered. (Even if you do need high resolution pictures any of these same cameras would suffice.)

    As for software I'm sure other Windows users will chime in but I'm a mac person myself. The basic iMovie, iDVD products will likely cover everything you want to do right out of the box without the fuss or big price tags. I've worked on many promo videos, presentations and haven't had to move past those tools yet. They're designed to be easy to use but their simplicity shouldn't be confused with being simplistic, there's nothing wrong with the quality.
    Hey i appreciate your response. Now may i ask what would be some of the features that you would recommend for the camcorder to have, or what format would it make it easier to be later edited on the computer? Also you mentioned software for software based tutorials, could you tell me some names of ones you would recommend?

    Again, thank you for your response.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Guru bronze trophy Slackr's Avatar
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    It is most likely that the camcorder will record a DV stream. Stick with a mainstream brand to eliminate the possibility of some weird third party format. Your camcorder will likely come with software that will pull the raw data over to your computer. Once you have it on the computer you can cut it up using the software, it isn't until you come to spit out the final product that you need to start thinking about compatible formats again. That is a choice based largely on your potential audience and what you have available to stream and play the video.

    Some camcorders will likely record in a compressed format to save you a step, but for the most part it is better to stick to a DV stream and compress the video for web delivery as the last step to preserve the quality. Too many compressions will slowly kill your quality.

    As for software I've used Adobe Captivate to create software tutorials for dummies. It is very easy to use and required very little intervention other than pressing record, doing the task, then going back and adding explanations or simplifying some of the tutorial steps. There is another cheaper product we use in this office but I've not used it myself. If you do a google search with "adobe captivate alternative" there's bound to be other programmes to find.

  7. #7
    SitePoint Enthusiast dineroking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slackr View Post
    It is most likely that the camcorder will record a DV stream. Stick with a mainstream brand to eliminate the possibility of some weird third party format. Your camcorder will likely come with software that will pull the raw data over to your computer. Once you have it on the computer you can cut it up using the software, it isn't until you come to spit out the final product that you need to start thinking about compatible formats again. That is a choice based largely on your potential audience and what you have available to stream and play the video.

    Some camcorders will likely record in a compressed format to save you a step, but for the most part it is better to stick to a DV stream and compress the video for web delivery as the last step to preserve the quality. Too many compressions will slowly kill your quality.

    As for software I've used Adobe Captivate to create software tutorials for dummies. It is very easy to use and required very little intervention other than pressing record, doing the task, then going back and adding explanations or simplifying some of the tutorial steps. There is another cheaper product we use in this office but I've not used it myself. If you do a google search with "adobe captivate alternative" there's bound to be other programmes to find.
    Again, thanks for your response, it is all very helpful information.

  8. #8
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    I think Canon 5D Mark II will be enought for your porposes...

  9. #9
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    I suggest Canon PowerShot SX10 IS,

  10. #10
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    One of the lower end nikon or canon dslr's that do HD video will suffice - one thing to note is that the video control in these is limited - e.g they don't track focus
    I'd avoid a bottom of range camcorder unless it does HD, unless you don't mind converting pixel aspect ratio between DV and PC.

  11. #11
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    I have the canon 400d.. never had any issues and still learning about it


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