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  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard Another Designer's Avatar
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    Adding IT to my skills

    My background is in graphic design. I have sold computers and software, as well as installed and troubleshooted.

    I want to add IT to my resume. I suppose I do have some skills I can advertise. However, I want to make sure I properly have IT under my belt.

    What websites can I go to in order to test my knowledge and gain news kills?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Another Designer, "IT" is just a buzzword for being good with computer's, it has no real application on a CV / resume because when people look for what your skills actually are, they want genuine skills like "computer repair", "web design", "c++ programming", "linux maintainence" or whatever you know how to do... NOT some random term like "IT" which applies to everything that falls under the category of computing. You should be trying to put real skills on your CV, not padding it out with meaningless buzzwords and jargon which sound pretty but hold no real value.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Wizard Another Designer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    Another Designer, "IT" is just a buzzword for being good with computer's, it has no real application on a CV / resume because when people look for what your skills actually are, they want genuine skills like "computer repair", "web design", "c++ programming", "linux maintainence" or whatever you know how to do... NOT some random term like "IT" which applies to everything that falls under the category of computing. You should be trying to put real skills on your CV, not padding it out with meaningless buzzwords and jargon which sound pretty but hold no real value.
    Well that's what I'm asking. I'm not using buzz words. I have high level design skills, and I have skills in upgrading computers ect... I'm not looking to deseave anyone with "buzz words" or whatever.

  4. #4
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Another Designer View Post
    Well that's what I'm asking. I'm not using buzz words. I have high level design skills, and I have skills in upgrading computers ect... I'm not looking to deseave anyone with "buzz words" or whatever.
    Well then state what areas of design and what areas of computing you are skilled in, the whole point of a resume is to showcase your skillset accurately, using words like IT are like fancy job titles, they are overblown statements that mean nothing

  5. #5
    chown linux:users\ /world Hartmann's Avatar
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    I would shy away from using the general wording of "IT" on your resume and focus more on your exact skills.

    You said that you are good at upgrading hardware and installing/troubleshooting software, so I would list those skills as knowledge in those particular areas. If it's a specific type of hardware or software, go into more detail.

    As far as bulking up on the skills, do you want to focus more on development or more on the hardware side? If on the hardware side, there are certification tests that you can take that show you understand the hardware. I believe the most popular of these tests is A+.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Enthusiast thomasfrank09's Avatar
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    If you're really wanting to get into the hardware side, I agree with Hartmann that you should get A+ certification. Just go buy one of those big A+ readiness books off amazon, and see if your friends have old computers they can give or sell to you for you to tinker around with. I did a job for a business owner (setting up her new computer), and in addition to paying me she gave me her old one. So now I just use that for practice.

    Software-wise, if you can learn from watching videos, I'd recommend subscribing to lynda.com. That side can teach you pretty much every aspect of web design and development, including programming.

    Another great resource is MIT's online coursework repository here. Who says and MIT education can't be free?
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  7. #7
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy bluedreamer's Avatar
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    Yes "iT" is too vague - one place I used to work had a cleaner that was part of the iT company section!

    Don't forget to add "basic" skills like being able install/upgrade software, you'd be suprised how many people are clueless in that respect.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Enthusiast thomasfrank09's Avatar
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    How true. One time I was at Best Buy, and on each Xbox game case there was a sticker that read, "Let us professionally install it for you."
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  9. #9
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    IT = "information technology"

    How do you organize information? With a database. How do you make a database? The easiest and most common way is with PHP. So learn PHP. My advice, buy a "Quickstart" guide to PHP.

  10. #10
    SitePoint Enthusiast thomasfrank09's Avatar
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    That's just one small facet of IT. Really, that last letter "T" is what you should pay attention to. Not what it stands for in the acronym, but how you should use it to represent your skillset. Successful IT pros have a broad knowledge base, with one specific area that they are absolute experts in. Hence the "T".
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  11. #11
    SitePoint Wizard
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    Like many, "IT" is not something anyone can master. If I see a resume and I see "Expert in IT". I will put that resume inside the trash can. So, try to focus on exact skills. LIke PhotoShop, Adobe, html, and etc... Please don't put "IT"

  12. #12
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    one stupid question here
    when girls do IT , there are at a disadvantage?

  13. #13
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Why would you think that? Women can be just as successful in computing as men, the issue is that more men apply for positions in computing then women (in many fields) therefore the number of women are disproportionate as they are a minority. That does not make them any less likely to get a job (or even more likely), it simply means that it doesn't matter what gender someone is, as long as they are qualified they will be considered.

  14. #14
    SitePoint Enthusiast thomasfrank09's Avatar
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    Yes, but read the thread before you do. The whole thread was about how you shouldn't just go about "adding IT" to your skills. Specialize.
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  15. #15
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abhaywow View Post
    Adding IT to my skills
    that's also in my must to do list
    Did you not read the thread? IT is a buzzword, you cannot call IT a skill because it doesnt actually mean anything.

  16. #16
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    The IT field is like the building trade except that for every different building job - bricklayer, carpenter, plubmer, electrician etc there are several hundred different IT jobs that differ about as much as the building jobs do. Saying that you know IT is less meaningful than someone saying that they are a builder since with a builder that means they know one of a few dozen different jobs where with IT it means they know one of a few thousands of different jobs.
    Stephen J Chapman

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  17. #17
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
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    When most people say IT, they mean either Desktop Support, or Server Administration.

    While there are other aspects to IT, companies who have IT departments tend to provide the technology infrastructure either for users (desktop support) or applications (ie: servers).

    Server stuff is relatively easy to learn the theory of (A+, MCSE, etc). Desktop stuff is harder, because it's a myriad of different skills. However MCSE, A+ are still good building blocks because they'll give you the basic education on how stuff works and why, so you'r emore likely to be able to track an issue down to hardware, software, application, permissions, virus, etc much more effectively.

    The biggest problem is that most courses will teach you to manage IT environments as if they are a single environment (ie: Linux, Windows, Apple, Novell, etc), where in reality almost every company is a mixture of tools and technologies.

    Ultimatey, you learn by doing. List your specific skills, not generic "IT". IT is like "music". You can be a musician, where you study percussion and your specialty is drums. But you can't be a musician if you don't know the how to play drums or the basics of percussion.

    Right now you need to learn the fundamentals of music (ie: A+/MCSE stuff), then move onto a specific field (ie: desktop/servers/databases/networking/etc) and then gain the specific skills necessary (desktop > antivirus, desktop > user account management, desktop > security, desktop > application installation, desktop > scripting, etc).
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  18. #18
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy W. View Post
    When most people say IT, they mean either Desktop Support, or Server Administration.
    No they don't. Over 90% of people actually in IT don't even know what those two minor aspects of IT are (at least not any more so than people not in IT do).
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  19. #19
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy Jeremy W.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgall View Post
    No they don't. Over 90% of people actually in IT don't even know what those two minor aspects of IT are (at least not any more so than people not in IT do).
    Feel free to look up the definition of IT. While it would also include networking and application support, most networking is done within server groups at corporations, and most application support is either on the servers or on the desktops, so falls under desktop support.

    You can't just say "no they don't", when really you mean you don't. Which is fine. However MIS/IT programs in corporations ranging from Fortune 500s to government tend to split the responsibilities logically into 4 groups: desktop support, servers and application support, networking, and mainframes. And the skills necessary for each are transferable, but uniquely applicable.
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