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  1. #26
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkbad View Post
    From my experience looking through the job ads, it seems that employers want you to know everything and then some. You should master HTML, XHTML, CSS, and then move on to Javascript, PHP, MySQL, XML, Apache, Regular Expressions, Web Standards Theory, SEO, etc.
    Yes this is one element of the industry which makes me rather sad; these days’ employers want someone who is an expert at everything, which is not realistically possible. When you place adverts for someone who knows about 10 different languages, you aren’t going to get an expert. The best you will end up with is someone who has learned enough to be able to produce the code effectively. I have yet to meet someone who can call themselves an expert in the field who is to that same level of standard in more than 3 disciplines, though that does not mean that they will not have a solid working knowledge of other technologies.

  2. #27
    SitePoint Addict skunkbad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    Yes this is one element of the industry which makes me rather sad; these daysí employers want someone who is an expert at everything, which is not realistically possible. When you place adverts for someone who knows about 10 different languages, you arenít going to get an expert. The best you will end up with is someone who has learned enough to be able to produce the code effectively. I have yet to meet someone who can call themselves an expert in the field who is to that same level of standard in more than 3 disciplines, though that does not mean that they will not have a solid working knowledge of other technologies.
    Unfortunately, this describes me. I have had to learn "everything", because that is what people expect, but I have strengths and weaknesses. My strengths are Photoshop, CSS, and PHP, and my weaknesses are everything else. I don't do ASP, and there's more that I don't do, but it's hard to fit much more in my brain right now!

  3. #28
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    Like lots of people, I started using Notepad. Not knowing the technologies behind WYSIWYG editors makes you less effective - there are tons of talented designers, but the number of good designers who are also HTML/CSS/jQuery gurus are far fewer.

    Aside from that, the software you use isn't really that important. What matters far more is your attitude and knowing your strengths and weaknesses. Of course, learn Photoshop and Dreamweaver because they are the industry standard. It's easier, for example, to work with designers because I can just ask for the original Photoshop file or Dreamweaver template.

    Becoming a Photoshop guru is fine, but there are many of those. The main things that will really help become a professional are:
    - read websites like SitePoint and stay up on the latest technologies, trends in design.
    - specialize in one or two things that you do really, really well
    - focus on your people skills: web design in client-oriented, people occupation. Develop excellent work habits, listening/facilitation skills.
    - make as many contacts as you can

    If you do those things, no one will really care if you use PS or Paint Shop Pro...because they will know you are a pro.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by skunkbad View Post
    From my experience looking through the job ads, it seems that employers want you to know everything and then some. You should master HTML, XHTML, CSS, and then move on to Javascript, PHP, MySQL, XML, Apache, Regular Expressions, Web Standards Theory, SEO, etc. This is just the beginning.... Amazon is your friend.
    Job ads are often wish lists rather than requirements lists, and if you have a great portfolio, a great resume and are good with people, that list will fade to a distant memory in their minds.

    Knowing a few things really, really well is always better than knowing ten things half-assed. No one can know every technology. The main thing employers want to know is: are you a problem solver?

  5. #30
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    if you already know HTML, its going to be easier for you to move to xhtml, javascrip, php etc

  6. #31
    SitePoint Addict bamaboy's Avatar
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    I must admit AJAX is really developing and people kinda like using anything which is involved with AJAX.

    I have been trying to learn AJAX since some days, lets see how it goes.
    you must also try it out.
    Good Luck
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  7. #32
    SitePoint Addict Fre420's Avatar
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    The common mistake here is that webdesign is taken for learning the tools.

    Learn usability, accesssibility, mental models, information architecture, design principles (grid, typography, color, contrast, compositions, ...), then start to learn the tools.

    You can master the tools like a professional & still make bad websites.
    You can master the thinking behind a website & it won't matter what tools you use, you'll end up with good websites.

    To clarify: You can know what handles & actions you can do in your tools, but as long as you don't know why you're doing them, you're just playing & guessing.
    Learn the WHY, then learn the HOW.

    The biggest problem is, & this also seems to be a general trend here in every design related education (Belgium), is that they don't learn the basic design principles anymore.
    I've got mates that do design courses that don't even learn basic compositions or typography anymore, but start right away with the the tools.

    The truth is, learning the principles of design takes a lot of time & it are these principles that will make or break your work.
    The tools ... you can learn these in just a matter of weeks.
    For learning the tools I highly recommend Video Tutorials (Lynda.com, Total Training etc ...)
    For learning design principles you'll have to learn books, & a lot of them.

  8. #33
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    If you are currently thinking of new things to learn and study because you want to have a profound knowledge about different things, you might want to consider and learn web design.

    Web design courses are widely available online and are considered to be one of the best and most popular degrees you can take at the moment because of its diversity and popularity when it comes to developments and innovations.

    If you have the passion for web designing, you can definitely learn a lot of things about web design. You can start from the very basic information that you might need and on to the most profound and most diverse types of knowledge you can ever find.

    Web design course are very much diverse and you can choose among the different degrees being offered online like high school courses, doctorate courses, associate courses, bachelor's degree programs and several others.

    Each of the different web design courses that you will study could not only help you be in the know on how to design a website, it could also help you acquire different variations when it comes to website applications and developments.

    The online world is very much promising and will continue to be so in the many years to come so learning web design could definitely provide you with the best and widest range of options when it comes to being successful in the future.

    Now, you can learn everything you need to know about web design and effectively incorporate all the knowledge that you can get by taking your degrees seriously.

  9. #34
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    In my experience, the recommendation is a strong function of dreamweaver, and then combined with mapping software photoshop very well.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by geosite View Post
    I use Dreamweaver, and most of my sites are dynamic (content management systems). Of course, I do a lot of hand-coding, so I wouldn't say Dreamweaver is a prerequisite. I've never used anything but Dreamweaver, so it's difficult for me to make comparisons.
    Oh, I see. So you're using a CMS and designing the pages in Dreamweaver?

    I guess for me Dreamweaver was too code-intensive, so I concluded that easy-to-use CMSs were the only way to design sites.
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