SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 43 of 43

Thread: I need guidance

  1. #26
    SitePoint Guru bronze trophy Slackr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    College cannot prepare you for the rest of your life, as you have probably seen due to the recession worldwide, finding work is hard, especially in a field such as web design which the vast majority have the same degree, which pretty much dilutes the value of the thing when the majority have one in a highly competitive field.(
    True. But in situations like this is when the investment of higher education comes in to play. You can't force the issue but you certainly have an advantage on your CV. It may make the difference between being considered and not being considered when employers are spoilt for choice.

    Good institutions and teachers should be pushing their students to be challenged and constantly thinking. Most of my real life job is made easier by my experiences in university (even though a completely different field), because I know how to problem solve, research, and most importantly - think critically about situations. Some people have life experience that teaches them these skills anyway, but if you haven't been exposed to these things higher education should be a good place to start.

    Another thing: there are differences in how institutions run and I would strongly advocate checking out ANY course face to face with someone from the place. I've studied at 3 different universities and the experiences were NOT all equal. I'm not a typical student and some institutions were much more flexible and adapted to my learning requirements than others. Some institutions can be VERY inflexible.

  2. #27
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Slackr View Post
    Another thing: there are differences in how institutions run and I would strongly advocate checking out ANY course face to face with someone from the place. I've studied at 3 different universities and the experiences were NOT all equal. I'm not a typical student and some institutions were much more flexible and adapted to my learning requirements than others. Some institutions can be VERY inflexible.
    I agree with this, things always vary in quality place to place. I really do not think I could handle going through a degree course anymore though. I did the college thing (in an unrealted course) but hopefully my continued experience of being self taught will serve me well in the future.

  3. #28
    billycundiff{float:left;} silver trophybronze trophy RyanReese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Whiteford, Maryland, United States
    Posts
    13,762
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    11 years-doesn't mean your better then those with less time.

    All great opinions-besides the little debate going on here and getting my thread hijakced.
    Always looking for web design/development work.
    http://www.CodeFundamentals.com

  4. #29
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RyanReese View Post
    11 years-doesn't mean your better then those with less time.

    All great opinions-besides the little debate going on here and getting my thread hijakced.
    Correct Ryan, I was just pointing it out because he said it Thouh I did find the debate rather interesting none the less

  5. #30
    Serial Entrepreneur
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As someone who has been a hiring manager many times in the past 20 years, let me give you my perspective, for whatever you decide it's worth.

    If I'm hiring someone for my company to do a job that has long-term potential, I want them to have completed a college education.

    Why? Because when you're young, you have very few opportunities to prove that you have the tenacity and staying power to follow-through with a commitment that is measured in years instead of days or months. Someone who succeeds through four or more years of college has proven that they can stick with something even when it gets tough, which means they are more likely to stick with my company when the job isn't the most fun.

    Hiring someone is expensive. There's a lot of time and effort involved in finding the right candidate for a position. I don't want to have to replace the person during the first couple of years, so I want to ensure that I not only picked the right candidate, but that the candidate has the staying power to stick around. At 22, you likely won't have held the same job for four years, but a college grad will definitely have stuck with their education for four years. That's serious staying power.

    Will you learn everything you need for your desired profession from the textbook and courses in college? Of course not. Will the college curriculum for your profession be behind the times by the time you graduate? Of course it will. But college also offers you a place to explore ideas you might never get to use directly, but will affect you in so many indirect ways that you'll lose count.

    You may feel like you want to do web design now, but in 10 years, will you still want to be a web designer -- will the job function even exist then? -- or would you want to be someone higher in the corporate food chain making more money for weighing bigger decisions? Moving higher means you're competing against people with college educations and maybe advanced degrees and the lack of education WILL count then.

    Just some background: I started programming on IBM mainframes when I was 14, went to college after just turning 17 to "learn" programming (which I already knew how to do), and have worked at IBM and HP and have owned several businesses. College didn't teach me to write computer programs, but it taught me a lot about programming and made me think about things (like the underlying operating system) that affect my programming choices now.

    You don't NEED to go to college. And what you learn there will not necessarily be vocational stuff that interests you today. But it pays off down the road in so many ways that you will definitely miss out on if you decide to go the "life experience" route.

    All that said: if you feel like your only choices are a vocational school or going to work, you should re-think your choices and figure out if there's something bigger you could be doing with your time.
    FreelanceLocalTech - FREE Freelance Consultant Directory!
    VersaReports Universal Report Server for .Net - Try It Now!

  6. #31
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Austin Texas
    Posts
    289
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I didn't read the entire thread but I think you'd benefit most career-wise from getting a Computer Science degree if you're more interested in development than design. You should also invest time in building a portfolio by working for real clients, perhaps doing internships at Web design firms in your area. Nothing will expand your skills like taking on real projects and real customers' demands.

    If you do college right, you will miss it for the rest of your life. It's an incredibly fulfilling experience, at least it was for me. Don't worry so much about the money. You'll also establish relationships and network with like-minded people, and that will be a great asset to you later on.

  7. #32
    SitePoint Guru bronze trophy Slackr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    679
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RyanReese View Post
    11 years-doesn't mean your better then those with less time.

    All great opinions-besides the little debate going on here and getting my thread hijakced.
    You can't learn 11 years of collective experience from a text book. You can be the best programmer in the world and have perfect code learnt from a book. Your websites can still suck.

    You are right that time doesn't equal skill, but it does mean that those people have seen the progression from where we have been and the pacing of where we will head, the likely pitfalls of any new implementations, the difference between real results and just having the 'newest' shiny flashy thing on your website.

    One of the wisest people I know said the other day he's always recommended people spend half of their time reading the things they enjoy and will likely agree with and the other half reading people who challenge their position.

    From what I can see people here have stayed on topic with varying viewpoints. That's what you get when you ask questions in an open forum. Everyone here is going to see things slightly differently.

  8. #33
    SitePoint Member webinnosales's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As the other say, much better if you continue first your studies and have a part time job in the same field as your course...

    WEB-Innovators-Professional and Quality Web Services

    MSN:webinnosales@web-innovators.com

  9. #34
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Very simply

    GO TO SCHOOL

    Education is one thing that once you have no one can take away

    Your job, your money, your house and cars are here one day gone the next

  10. #35
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think that you should go to college. Its definitely worth it, some businesses and other companies this days preferred applicants with a degree in college.
    I Got my Teacher Certification in 3 months!

  11. #36
    Non-Member a_samuel90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I know so many webmasters who are students and they're successful, c'mon the internet isn't what some people, think I know webmasters as young as 14 and they have amazing websites that make money

  12. #37
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi i will advice you to first complete your graduation then do M.B.A and while studying M.B.A or doing your Graduation learn Web-Designing Online for the time being and after completion of your course you can join any good institute, i am telling you this because in real its very difficult to earn from this profession you can earn good but you need to have strong knowledge in java,.Net programming,PHP or any other good server side scripting language etc...if you do you graduation and MBA and do web designing course in side then there will be a wide career in front of you you can choose any profession as your career.
    Thanks.
    Submit Articles

  13. #38
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    1,432
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @Ryan

    It sounds like you don't want to attend college...
    Take a year off and see if you can find work(web job), and then go from there....

    The work world isn't all its cut out to be!
    Trust me.... College is fun times!!!
    Before you know it you will be sitting in your cubical coding up some 'semantics' in no time

  14. #39
    Follow Me On Twitter: @djg gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy Dan Grossman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Philadephia, PA
    Posts
    20,578
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    College is a great 4-year-long excuse to not get a job while you work on making the "work for yourself" thing happen. At the end of it, even if you don't come out as a successfully self-employed business owner, you'll have the degree (and 4 years of portfolio building) you need to get a real job instead of an entry-level internship.

    HTML, CSS, Photoshop layouts... these things may not be around in 20 years. There will be no such thing as a job marking up HTML pages. We probably won't even have mouses to point at links and click anymore. All the college educated computer scientists will have moved computer UI past that point.

    What will you be doing then to pay your family's mortgage and put your child through college?

  15. #40
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    England, UK
    Posts
    8,111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Dan, I think your being slightly over dramatic about not having HTML in 20 years, IE6 has managed to linger for 8 years and still remain in the top 5 browsers (if you include version numbers seperately) in use today and we still can't seem to get rid of it. Personally at the rate we are working at it will be a miracle if CSS3, HTML5 and any form of XHTML are common practice in 20 years Which is why I said do NOT study a web design related course, the industry is too dynamic and the academic institutions can't seem to keep the required skills up to date (most still use table based design for example!), taking a course in a different field but has skills you can apply to your design may be a good thing as if you ever burn out as a web techie, you always have something to fall back on

    Good examples being: Sociology, Psychology, Languages (English / Spanish / Chinese / Etc), Academic research areas, Media studies, Business studies, graphic design, etc

  16. #41
    dooby dooby doo silver trophybronze trophy
    spikeZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Manchester UK
    Posts
    13,807
    Mentioned
    158 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    Bear in mind that Ryan's current status is NON-MEMBER and so he cant reply directly.
    The information in the thread is still valid and current so I will leave it open for now
    Mike Swiffin - Community Team Advisor
    Only a woman can read between the lines of a one word answer.....

  17. #42
    SitePoint Zealot bgil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    So. California
    Posts
    124
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Ryan,
    Congratulations on your high school graduation! Surely you're getting college advice beyond Sitepoint from friends and especially family. You're decision now is not written in stone - you can change your mind later. I think a diploma says you were able to achieve a goal while making sacrifices and working hard. Whatever you decide - stay flexible, and best of luck. I got my degree while working full time, and my employer paid a nice portion of the tuition as well.
    -Brad

  18. #43
    billycundiff{float:left;} silver trophybronze trophy RyanReese's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Whiteford, Maryland, United States
    Posts
    13,762
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    Dan, I think your being slightly over dramatic about not having HTML in 20 years, IE6 has managed to linger for 8 years and still remain in the top 5 browsers (if you include version numbers seperately) in use today and we still can't seem to get rid of it. Personally at the rate we are working at it will be a miracle if CSS3, HTML5 and any form of XHTML are common practice in 20 years Which is why I said do NOT study a web design related course, the industry is too dynamic and the academic institutions can't seem to keep the required skills up to date (most still use table based design for example!), taking a course in a different field but has skills you can apply to your design may be a good thing as if you ever burn out as a web techie, you always have something to fall back on

    Good examples being: Sociology, Psychology, Languages (English / Spanish / Chinese / Etc), Academic research areas, Media studies, Business studies, graphic design, etc
    I'm thinking graphic desiggn as that is one area in web design wehre I really lack ability in. Photoshop/fireworks is where I need help in.
    Quote Originally Posted by spikeZ View Post
    Bear in mind that Ryan's current status is NON-MEMBER and so he cant reply directly.
    The information in the thread is still valid and current so I will leave it open for now
    Which was for a reason that I didn't even commit! Irony

    Quote Originally Posted by bgil View Post
    Hi Ryan,
    Congratulations on your high school graduation! Surely you're getting college advice beyond Sitepoint from friends and especially family. You're decision now is not written in stone - you can change your mind later. I think a diploma says you were able to achieve a goal while making sacrifices and working hard. Whatever you decide - stay flexible, and best of luck. I got my degree while working full time, and my employer paid a nice portion of the tuition as well.
    Yes I am going to take a semester off and probably go back. The community college is probably where I will be going. A quick little thing there just to say I went to college. They offer a web design course that will offer "C-S-S" . I really want to go there just to own the crap out of the teacher. It would be hilarious.."Oh teacher you need to contain your floats, ah you didn't fix IE6's double float margin bug. NEWB!"
    Always looking for web design/development work.
    http://www.CodeFundamentals.com


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •