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  1. #26
    SitePoint Addict Fre420's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    display: none? Basically only text-browsers will see it, but you'll miss the screen readers. JAWS won't read it out.

    But yeah I've seen that, first from Mike Cherim, and now I've started using them sometimes too (hidden headers).

    I was thinking more about this content-first, and realised no matter what you do, you end up with skip links. Either they need to skip to your content, or they need to skip to your navigation. Nobody wants to crawl through navigation before getting to the content, and nobody wants to crawl through the content just to get to the navigation. So I'm starting to wonder if it matters at all. Half-empty? Half-full? Matters at all?
    What's the best way to hide them ?
    Code:
    height:1px;
    margin-bottom:-1px;
    line-height:1px;
    font-size:1px;
    text-indent:-9999px;
    overflow:hidden;
    ?
    +
    Code:
    pitch: high;
    speech-rate:fast;
    volume: loud

  2. #27
    SitePoint Addict Fre420's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    I was thinking more about this content-first, and realised no matter what you do, you end up with skip links. Either they need to skip to your content, or they need to skip to your navigation. Nobody wants to crawl through navigation before getting to the content, and nobody wants to crawl through the content just to get to the navigation. So I'm starting to wonder if it matters at all. Half-empty? Half-full? Matters at all?
    For a deep content page that is very long, you are sure that the h1 & content loads first (which is the most important part, & the part that interests the visitor), after the content is fully loaded, the headnavigation (header) loads, which is at that point less important.

    There should also be a SEO benefit, but I have no idea how much it improves. I guess it all depends how much links you have in your top navigation. That was how I was thought anyway. I've never seen real test data to confirm this. I do this standard from my first CSS design, so I haven't got any data to state how a website would perform without it SEO wise.

    In terms of navigation. On all my sites (with decent information architecture & click paths) I can clearly see in the analytics & in my clicktale videos that the section navigation & the breadcrumbs are a lot more clicked then the links to other sections (headnav links) - when the visitor is already getting deeper into the website (so the homepage doesn't count).
    Putting the section navigation & breadcrumbs before the head navigation does make sense for visually impaired users too, I guess. The same for the language navigation. Once the users has chosen his language, it's very unlikely he'll have to change it again. (I check the browser language anyway)

    I also put a lot of time in getting good & clear clickpaths in the content. This way I can influence the user more to click where I want him to click ... paths which all end to conversion points.
    On a section overview, the best practice is to link to the most important pages in that section (or the most visited). The links in the content are more clear (because they are placed in a context - for example what category should I choose) then the left navigation. So I think it makes perfectly sense to first present the content with embedded links first, & then the section navigation which gives an overview of all links of that section.
    But again, I have no data to confirm this for the visual impaired users, as my website are only visited by machines with visual disabilities (search engines).

  3. #28
    SitePoint Addict CWebguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMagicMaria View Post
    Thanks for the replies so far! Keep them coming.



    I'm a little confused by that statement. So you think it *is* necessary to put content before navigation, even if I provide a "jump link" to skip the navigation?

    I am very adept at CSS, so that's not so much the issue, but I believe in making things be as simple as possible to make them maintainable. If I don't need to do tricks with negative margins or absolute positioning, I don't want to.

    Maria
    You don't have to. Just create a containing div and float your content right and your sidebar left, that's what I always do.

    Cheers.

  4. #29
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy devbanana's Avatar
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    I'm totally blind, and use a screen reader. I find it annoying when people put content first. I usually don't want to stick around on the home page anyway once I know what the site's about.

    Honestly, as long as you put an h1 tag before your content, it is really easy to jump to if I want to.

    if you do put content first, please put a skip to navigation link, because otherwise I have to go through all of the content to find the navigation.

    There seems to be some misconception of how screen readers work. They just don't read through the whole page, and force you to listen to navigation if it comes first. There are a lot of keystrokes to get really wherever you want to. You can jump to headings, lists, tables, fields, etc. I only use JAWS, so I don't know how other screen readers are, but I'm sure they're not much different.
    Laudetur Iesus Christus!
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    Jesus is the Good Shepherd

  5. #30
    Mouse catcher silver trophy Stevie D's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JustMagicMaria View Post
    I know it is conventional wisdom that we should put content first in HTML. I've heard two reasons for this: SEO and accessibility. But putting HTML in a different order than it should be displayed complicates CSS significantly and I'm trying to decide if it's worth it.

    So, my question to you, fellow web developers, is are there any studies or good articles that justify the practice? I've been putting "skip to content" links in my HTML for years to aid those using screen readers. I've heard that SEO isn't really effected by content order, especially compared to marking up content semantically using headings, titles, etc. Are these measures enough or do I have to continue to use complicated CSS?
    SEO
    It is unlikely that content-order will make a lot of difference to search engines as long as everything is properly marked up. If Google, with all the technology they have at their disposal, can't separate out the content from the navigation, I'll eat my hat...

    I have seen a study that showed that search engines stopped indexing content after a certain length - but Google was indexing the first 500KB of a page back in 2006, and if that has changed at all in the last 3 years it will have gone up. As long as you're keeping all your scripts, stylesheets and other embedded objects in external files, you are highly unlikely to get anywhere near 500KB, so there's no problem there.

    Accessibility
    Here, we have a dichotomy of what should be the best way of doing things, and what users have come to expect.

    As Alex and others have said, having content before navigation ought to make things easier for screen readers, by negating the need for users to make their way past all the navigation on every page.

    However, as this article shows, logic doesn't always come good in real life. Because navigation-first has become the de facto standard on the vast majority of websites, that is what most screen-reader users have come to expect. Because they can't see the page, they have to work from a conceptual model of how they expect the page to be - so obviously it is in their interests if we can build pages that fit that model.

  6. #31
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    Ah, thank you for the link, StevieD! That's just what I was looking for -- references to studies and previous discussion about this issue. In the comments of the A List Apart article I found this useful gem:

    InteractionsPaperAuthorsVer

    (Stupid spam filter! You'll have to search the comments for the link.)

    So I am still making up my mind about this issue.

    For the record, I would like to make an HTML template that can be laid out with CSS to have HORIZONTAL primary navigation that appears either in the header or below the header but above the content. Most solutions to "content first" layouts float sidebars to the left or right which is trivial.

    Maria

  7. #32
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    Can someone show me what your skip link looks like (html)? I assume it's invisible to visitors but can be "seen" by the blind, right?

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by devbanana View Post
    I usually don't want to stick around on the home page anyway once I know what the site's about.
    What about every other page except the home page then? I guess I don't understand why people want to go somewhere else before looking at/listening to the content. Why go to that page in the first place if all you want is to get away from there?

    Quote Originally Posted by geosite View Post
    Can someone show me what your skip link looks like (html)? I assume it's invisible to visitors but can be "seen" by the blind, right?
    It's a normal link. Best practice is to keep it visible for everyone, but if you want to hide it from graphic browsers you can position it off-screen.
    Code HTML4Strict:
    <p id="skip"><a href="#nav">To page menu</a></p>
    Code CSS:
    #skip {position:absolute; left:-999em}

    Another option is to have it hidden by default, but display it when it receives keyboard focus. I do that on my blog (try tabbing a few times in Firefox or IE; it won't work in Opera which uses its own focus method).
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  9. #34
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by devbanana
    There seems to be some misconception of how screen readers work. They just don't read through the whole page, and force you to listen to navigation if it comes first. There are a lot of keystrokes to get really wherever you want to. You can jump to headings, lists, tables, fields, etc. I only use JAWS, so I don't know how other screen readers are, but I'm sure they're not much different.
    Yup. I've started checking to see if I have headers in my #headers as 99% of the time they actually don't belong there:
    Quote Originally Posted by me
    After having gotten to the page you want, though, you'd then want to be able to skip going through a bunch of links and the header stuff-- and skip links are a nice way to do this, though using the H quickkey is easier-- often there are no headers before the navigation
    Quote Originally Posted by Fre420
    What's the best way to hide them ?
    I use position: absolute, -bazillion units, and I've also started to have them show on :focus after catching one of mine in JAWS and getting confuzled (which is sad, cause I knew it was there but forgot).

    Example, tab a few times through this page and that's what I've been doing... I think I got that from Mike Cherim and thought it was awesome. So I style them in the site colours and make 'em purdy too. : ) Problem is the destination isn't a focussable element. Some browsers are ok with that and others aren't. : (

    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy
    What about every other page except the home page then? I guess I don't understand why people want to go somewhere else before looking at/listening to the content. Why go to that page in the first place if all you want is to get away from there?
    You're getting to the url, now you want some specific thing from that site.
    People are often looking for something. Where to buy a CD, where to find that piece of code, where to find the name of that one guy in that band, what's that maximum I can earn before needing to report to tax bureau? Who wants to read the entire tax bureau site, or even their first page?? Who wants to read all 50 bloggities on a blog site? Who wants to read everything on Amazon's front page (or any inner page either) if your purpose is not browsing??

    I still think it depends on the type of page and what the user's goal is, but this is what I meant with my insurance sites-- people only want the menu, until they get to the form or PDF they came there to get. They don't want to read about how great and wonderful company X is. Looking at the competition, everyone pretty much says the same text anyway: quick! cheap! get a quote! we rock! Get a discount! Sign up! ...which is a little sad maybe, but that's the way it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by devbanana
    I'm totally blind, and use a screen reader.
    Great. It'll be anecdotal, but does it help, hurt, or do nothing to have a back to top button at the bottom of a page (any page, long or short)? It's been handy for keyboarding with IE and FF, but don't know if it matters for any screen reader users.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    Oh thanks to StevieD for the link. Sometimes I feel I need a pith helmet-- we're looking for rare birds of paradise! We guess and speculate what they like, what they eat, what they do (I'm referring to web-users only here). Most of us have never seen such a bird, only photos and recordings. When the rare study (which is never huge) comes along, we devour it like hungry dogs, and yet still never sure how correct that even was. We know they are out there, somewhere, but I rely on 90% hearsay and guesswork and I hate that.

    Maybe that team at Google who spends months testing which shade of blue works best can go do some valuable research for us. : ) Something with... thousands of participants.

  11. #36
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy devbanana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AutisticCuckoo View Post
    What about every other page except the home page then? I guess I don't understand why people want to go somewhere else before looking at/listening to the content. Why go to that page in the first place if all you want is to get away from there?
    Exactly what Stomme poes said.

    When I go to a site, and I'm looking for a link, there are a few ways I will try to find it:

    • If I'm familiar with the site, I know how to find what I'm looking for
    • Press insert+F7 to list all links. Navigation links are hopefully towards the top.
    • Rarely trying headings. Only rarely because most sites don't use a heading before navigation.
    • Just use ctrl+F if I know the wording but not the location.


    For the links list method, if there are a whole bunch of irrelevant content links at the top, that can get annoying.

    For the heading method, if I would use it, and navigation was after content, I'd go through the content headings first. Annoying when there are many of them.

    I should note, even "skip" links don't always work for me. usually they do, but sometimes JAWS just doesn't jump to the right place. Occasionally it stays in the same place, or jumps in some location close to the intended target.
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  12. #37
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy devbanana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    Great. It'll be anecdotal, but does it help, hurt, or do nothing to have a back to top button at the bottom of a page (any page, long or short)? It's been handy for keyboarding with IE and FF, but don't know if it matters for any screen reader users.
    It can't hurt honestly, but usually if I want to go to the top, well I use ctrl+home and I'm there.

    By the way, I love accesskeys. For instance, on Sitepoint, I just press alt+shift+2 if I want to view new posts. If that wasn't there, I'd have to press insert+F7, and start typing "new posts" or whatever the text of the link is, until JAWS announced it, then hit enter. Not too much longer, but still useful to have the accesskey.

    As far as content, really almost any site isn't too hard to get around, except when they use absolutely no headings and there is a lot of other stuff before it.

    But for instance, if I want to find the content of a post on Sitepoint, I know to go down to the third heading, where usually it's about ordering a book or something, then hit 'n' to go down to the next bit of non-linked text, and that'll usually take me to the beginning of a thread. On the main forum index, I know to hit 'l' a few times to get to the list of forums. I look for such common elements to make navigating a little easier.
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  13. #38
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    I should note, even "skip" links don't always work for me. usually they do, but sometimes JAWS just doesn't jump to the right place. Occasionally it stays in the same place, or jumps in some location close to the intended target.
    I haven't gotten that in JAWS yet (maybe because I only do my own sites and CSS forums like SitePoint in it?) but I do get it in different browsers (without JAWS). They'll all move my cursor but Safari brings my next TAB back to the top (if the destination isn't a focussable anchor).

    Do you happen to remember a site/page where that happens? I want to see their code. What if they have the same code I'm using??? (fingers crossed, so far IE works but I hate trying to test in the other browsers because I'm not smart enough to learn completely different commands for each browser. I struggle with just JAWS and IE6).

    I'm terrified of using (making) accesskeys for fear they'll interfere with some strange computer or OS or browser in a way I don't know about or intend. It's good to get at least anecdotal feedback from someone who actually uses them though. Do you memorise the keys of the sites you visit the most? Isn't each site different in what they use for what? Or have all the larger sites agreed on some sort of system so they're all the same? (edit, I'm going to peek at Site Point's code again)

    Though, my sites are in Dutch so even if the Engrish world has a system, I'd have to find the Dutch one. My grandma-in-law heard "home page" and wrote in a note to us "hoom peech" because she'd never seen it spelled.

  14. #39
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    People are often looking for something. Where to buy a CD, where to find that piece of code, where to find the name of that one guy in that band, what's that maximum I can earn before needing to report to tax bureau? Who wants to read the entire tax bureau site, or even their first page?? Who wants to read all 50 bloggities on a blog site? Who wants to read everything on Amazon's front page (or any inner page either) if your purpose is not browsing??
    Okay, I can understand that for the start page. But on interior pages, shouldn't the main purpose be to access its content, rather than to keep navigating to other pages where the first thing you do is go somewhere else?

    And how often do you visit start pages on known sites anyway? Don't you use bookmarks for the interesting stuff, or use search engines to find the right page?
    Quote Originally Posted by devbanana View Post
    When I go to a site, and I'm looking for a link, there are a few ways I will try to find it:
    And then you find the link and go to that page. Then what? You look for another link and go somewhere else? Don't you ever want to get to the content of a page? Or are you just amused by going from page to page looking for the end of the Internet?

    I'm being facetious, of course. But I'm wondering how common it is to enter a site in the 'wrong' place and then spend a while clicking to get where you want to go, compared to using bookmarks or a search engine and go straight to the good stuff.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  15. #40
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    Okay, I can understand that for the start page. But on interior pages, shouldn't the main purpose be to access its content, rather than to keep navigating to other pages where the first thing you do is go somewhere else?
    Yeah but only after I know I'm on the page I want. Then, if it's like a whole article on exactly what I'm looking for, yeah, I want the content. Why I said either way you're stuck with a skip link or something. I know I spend more time on the train than at the destination though. I'll search and click my way through a few pages before getting the one I want. How does the site-owner know when I'm where I want to be, how far deep I'm trying to get to? Maybe in the future people will manipulate source-order on the fly... instead of going to the spoon, the spoon comes to you! Actually, I'm sure that's the next big web app.

    And how often do you visit start pages on known sites anyway? Don't you use bookmarks for the interesting stuff, or use search engines to find the right page?
    Can't speak for anyone else but I type url's in directly. nu.nl, irs.gov, csscreator.com, icanhazcheezburger.com... I remember the urls because the name is there, and before going to google I'll try CompanyName.com or NameOfoOganisation.nl just because most of the time that works (it also gets me pr0n and spam tho).
    When I come here I type in sitepoint.com/forums and when I go to wikipedia I start with the language and type from there (sometimes my browser already has the link because I've been there before earlier in the day so sometimes I can choose from that): nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/MYSUBJECT

    Google often gives me a good url with a bad end. I sometimes go backwards in my addressbar, removing directories until I find some "root" page that isn't the homepage (so still an inner page). Like nameofsite.com/members or nameofsite.com/events/year/month. Though I often get FORBIDDEN but also find a lot of pages that way. Likely because I don't use my browser right and I'm doin it wrong. I can't get comic sites to bring me back to the first comic, but I can always change that "page=351" to "page=1" because it works when the little javaJunk dropdowns don't.

    Prolly nobody else does this though. I need one of those LOLcat posters, "YER DOIN IT RONG!"

  16. #41
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    When I come here I type in sitepoint.com/forums
    I just press Ctrl+2, using Opera's SpeedDial feature.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    when I go to wikipedia I start with the language and type from there (sometimes my browser already has the link because I've been there before earlier in the day so sometimes I can choose from that): nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/MYSUBJECT
    I type w MYSUBJECT (English) or ws MYSUBJECT (Swedish) in the address field, using the Search Engine/nickname feature in Opera.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  17. #42
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy devbanana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    I haven't gotten that in JAWS yet (maybe because I only do my own sites and CSS forums like SitePoint in it?) but I do get it in different browsers (without JAWS). They'll all move my cursor but Safari brings my next TAB back to the top (if the destination isn't a focussable anchor).

    Do you happen to remember a site/page where that happens? I want to see their code. What if they have the same code I'm using??? (fingers crossed, so far IE works but I hate trying to test in the other browsers because I'm not smart enough to learn completely different commands for each browser. I struggle with just JAWS and IE6).
    Sorry, I don't remember an example. I haven't really noticed much of a pattern, but I'll have to pay better attention.

    It might be something with JAWS. It used to be a lot worse at it, but now has gotten better. But when they just came out with support for Firefox, again it didn't support those type of links that well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    I'm terrified of using (making) accesskeys for fear they'll interfere with some strange computer or OS or browser in a way I don't know about or intend. It's good to get at least anecdotal feedback from someone who actually uses them though. Do you memorise the keys of the sites you visit the most? Isn't each site different in what they use for what? Or have all the larger sites agreed on some sort of system so they're all the same? (edit, I'm going to peek at Site Point's code again)

    Though, my sites are in Dutch so even if the Engrish world has a system, I'd have to find the Dutch one. My grandma-in-law heard "home page" and wrote in a note to us "hoom peech" because she'd never seen it spelled.
    There's really no pattern, except that usually forums use 's' for submitting posts, search, etc. I just usually become more familiar with the sites I visit regularly.
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  18. #43
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    I type w MYSUBJECT (English) or ws MYSUBJECT (Swedish) in the address field, using the Search Engine/nickname feature in Opera.
    I swear I TRY to use Opera but I keep forgetting the thingies I need to type and keep opening that dialog boxie thingie that tells you what to type! : )

    I'm sure Firefox has similar things but I tend to form habits and they stay.

  19. #44
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy devbanana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AutisticCuckoo View Post
    Okay, I can understand that for the start page. But on interior pages, shouldn't the main purpose be to access its content, rather than to keep navigating to other pages where the first thing you do is go somewhere else?

    And how often do you visit start pages on known sites anyway? Don't you use bookmarks for the interesting stuff, or use search engines to find the right page?
    It really depends. For instance, I regularly visit Cracked. They really don't have much content on the front page except for links to other places, but that's an example where I just want to see the latest articles they have, and then click through to one of those. They put navigation first, but the content of their articles are easy enough to find because it's usually just a heading or two down.

    I know when I visit The Consumerist, to see the content of a post, I go to the second h1. I've gotten used to that, and the navigation doesn't pose any problems.

    So I think it's a compromise between making it easy to get to the content, but still making it easy to find other pages to navigate to. For instance, on these forums, I want to easily find the posts, but also I want to be able to easily get back to the forum I was just browsing. If they put those links below the posts, that'd be quite annoying, because I'd need to find the last post of the page, then find the navigation below that.
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  20. #45
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    I think the best way we could give people an idea of what the website is about before providing the content is to provide an introduction panel, the use of introduction blocks below the navigation at the top of a page is now common practice and provides a brief description of the websites intentions. In my eyes the ideal method to providing an accessible way to suit all users would be to use the following order...
    • Logo – Make sure your users are aware they are still on your website.
    • Skip Links – Provide accessible users the method to jump down the page to the section they require.
    • Introduction Panel – Give the user an introduction to what the website or section of the site is about.
    • Content – Provide what the people who visit your website are after.
    • Navigation – Provide this last so it is not repeated upon each load of a page, users can get here through skip links if required.

    The above method allows screen readers to use the following method.
    • Where Am I?
    • I have been here before and I know where I want to go.
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  21. #46
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    first time that I'm visiting the sitepoint forum and found this thread very interesting, and I agree with Alex, what a crawler should see after the meta is the heading (h1 your logo with alt text and title) then your organized content.

    no official answer from Google ?

  22. #47
    SitePoint Addict Fre420's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lws View Post
    first time that I'm visiting the sitepoint forum and found this thread very interesting, and I agree with Alex, what a crawler should see after the meta is the heading (h1 your logo with alt text and title) then your organized content.

    no official answer from Google ?
    I disagree with the logo as H1.
    A H1 should be unique on every page.

    I don't even make it an "H" anymore
    Also because I use the Company name in the Tagline, together with the UVP (which tells a lot more about the company : Company Name - What we do best / why you should hire us)

    I put it with an id in my headnav. & visually pull it out of the UL to place it in the left top.
    This way I only have one link back to the homepage, no repetition - aka a standalone logo + a link in the headnav pointing to the homepage - but a combination that provides the best of both worlds.

    Code:
    <h2>Tagline website (name + UVP)</h2>
    <h2>Head Navigation</h2>
    <ul id="headnav">
      <li id="home" rel="home" title=""><a href="" title=""><img src="" alt="" title=""></a></li>
      <li><a href="" title="">setion 1</a></li>
      <li><a href="" title="">setion 2</a></li>
      ...
    </ul>

  23. #48
    SitePoint Zealot boen_robot's Avatar
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    @devbanana
    I can't speak for everyone, but I for one must say I really appreciate you telling us all that you did until now. I've seen comments from a few blind people before, and every one of them has in every one of their posts provided an interesting point of view for whatever the topic was. No feedback is more precious than the one of the actual targeted end user.

    Oddly enough, I've had similar thoughts about that question. I always put a header (possibly with a title or something) first, then navigation, then content, each with a skip link to the next, and at the bottom, a "back to top" link. The reasons for which I do it are:
    1. As said many times already, it's a convention users have come to expect.
    2. As said a few times, users often come from search engines looking for something, not from the home page. Therefore, every page should be treated as a start page.
    3. As devbanana said, you can always use keyboard combinations to move towards or away from the navigation and/or content. If you make the navigation last, it may not always be clear how many tabs you need to make before you reach the first navigation element. The same from the "All links" menus.
    4. You can move easily with the keyboard without explicitly specifying tab index everywhere. I personally avoid that, as it too often creates confusion for non blind users, myself included.
    5. No one has yet mentioned mobile phones yet though. On such devices, you can only move with a keyboard (touch phones like iPhone excluded). They usually also have limited CSS support. Exposing navigation first for such devices makes navigation much easier, especially for cases where not all of your navigation is in one place, and thus you force the user to get to a few subsections before reaching what they're after.

    BTW, access keys are another topic, but I too provide them, but only on a few key places, namely, navigation. They may not be easy for most users, but they can't really hurt. Especially in Opera, since in it, you have to actually use a key combo (Shift + Escape) after which you press the access key.
    XML_XSLT2Processor - perform XSLT 2.0 transformations in PHP.
    (my library, all feedback welcome)

  24. #49
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    I would also be very interested in hearing how this applies to the mobile market as well.

  25. #50
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    Smile

    We generally put content just after header in HTML. However I donít think that has got anything to do with the way web spiders are crawling your site.


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