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  1. #26
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    For HTML, you can consider using Frontpage or even MS-Word/PowerPoint (then save it as HTML). However be warned the HTML code produced by WYSIWYG program is usually nasty and contains lots of useless code. If you are interested in a flash website, you can try A4desk or A4DeskPro website builder, both are Windows software which perform well on my Windows XP computer. I tried few others but they run too slow and I don't like online editors.

  2. #27
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    If you don't want to purchase a software to build your website, you can try online website creators that have wysiwyg editor. I checked ZDNet uk and I found Terapad as the editor's choice. The reviews were based on a pro account but according to the article, free, standard and pro are built in with the same features. Perhaps you can try out their free website option first and familiarize the system. When you feel that you're comfortable on their platform, you can easily switch to a standard/pro account to remove the ads.

    Hope it helps and goodluck on your website!

  3. #28
    SitePoint Enthusiast leeham's Avatar
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    I used to use Microsoft Frontage 2000 for years and thought it was great to learn HTML and as a beginners program. Now I use use Dreamweaver CS3 as you can pretty much do anything with it. Not too overpriced either.


  4. #29
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    Dreamweaver is the best on this field IMO. Sadly it has become incredibly expensive.

  5. #30
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    Are the differences in code between hand code and WYSIWYG that drastically different? I'm planning on building a website soon and picked up a sitepoint book on hand code as well as a book on DW CS4.

    I guess DS4 isn't worth considering for my ecommerce website?

  6. #31
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArthurCatigbe View Post
    Are the differences in code between hand code and WYSIWYG that drastically different?
    If you code using Dreamweaver's code window alone you will have no problem (as it is hand coding) but if you use any WYSIWYG editor including Dreamweaver and Expression Web the code may be extremely different to the point that it may not even validate correctly, you may suffer accessibility implications and your SEO ranking may be damaged.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    If you code using Dreamweaver's code window alone you will have no problem (as it is hand coding) but if you use any WYSIWYG editor including Dreamweaver and Expression Web the code may be extremely different to the point that it may not even validate correctly, you may suffer accessibility implications and your SEO ranking may be damaged.
    I thought Dreamweaver was one of the standard application used by web developers.

    You're telling it's that bad?

  8. #33
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArthurCatigbe View Post
    I thought Dreamweaver was one of the standard application used by web developers.

    You're telling it's that bad?
    While it does remain the favorite WYSIWYG editor, it should be pointed out that the professionals who use it only use the code view window, they do not make use of the potentially sloppy code that the WYSIWYG part of the program churns out. And I have seen websites which were produced entirely through the WYSIWYG section and while it was better put together then some other visual editors, the end result was still extremely poor.

    There is absolutely no substitute whatsoever for hand coding, nothing comes close and you should always be aware of what you are pumping into your documents.

  9. #34
    . shoooo... silver trophy logic_earth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foscolo View Post
    I don't understand why anybody would buy Dreamweaver or Microsoft Expression. They're soooo expensive...
    Not all that expensive for Expression Web.

    Dreamweaver: $399; Upgrade $199
    Expression Web: $299; Upgrade $99

    Expression Web has a unique upgrade policy.
    $99 (Full Version $299)
    For qualifying owners of:
    • Licensed copy of an earlier version of Expression Web

    OR
    • Adobe Creative Suite - any version
    • Adobe/Macromedia Flash or Director - any version
    • Adobe/Macromedia Dreamweaver - any version
    • Adobe GoLive - any version
    • Microsoft Office - any version
    • Microsoft FrontPage® - any version
    • Quark QuarkXPress - any version
    I'm waiting for the third version of Expression Web. If you are a student like me, you can get it for free.
    Logic without the fatal effects.
    All code snippets are licensed under WTFPL.


  10. #35
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    My vote goes to dreamweaver as it allows users to preview websites in locally-installed web browsers. It also has site management tools, such as FTP/SFTP and WebDAV file transfer and synchronization features, the ability to find and replace lines of text or code by search terms and regular expressions across the entire site, and a templating feature that allows single-source update of shared code and layout across entire sites without server-side includes or scripting.

  11. #36
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    Dreamweaver is by far the best.

    I wouldn't be caught dead with it, but if I had to recommend one for someone starting out it would be Dreamweaver.

  12. #37
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    My vote goes to dreamweaver as well.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by itzpaul View Post
    I think dreamweaver is the best WYSIWYG editor.
    well it is all personal...right?

  14. #39
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    Expression is my choice and always has been

  15. #40
    SitePoint Wizard boxhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexDawson View Post
    While it does remain the favorite WYSIWYG editor, it should be pointed out that the professionals who use it only use the code view window, they do not make use of the potentially sloppy code that the WYSIWYG part of the program churns out. And I have seen websites which were produced entirely through the WYSIWYG section and while it was better put together then some other visual editors, the end result was still extremely poor.

    There is absolutely no substitute whatsoever for hand coding, nothing comes close and you should always be aware of what you are pumping into your documents.
    Although this may be true for advanced websites, simple stuff is done very well in dreamweaver. If you need a table 5 rows by 5 columns with some text and some styles attached to various bits then you can't go far wrong. I learnt everything i know by having a starting point i.e. some code to look at and pick apart.

    What ever WYSIWYG editor you use I would use the split design/code view as a minimum and try and understand as much of what the design view is doing as possible.

    My 2 peneth

    monkey
    monkey - the rest is history

  16. #41
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    The only thing I would use a WYSIWYG editor for is Information Architecture (creating mock-up’s of potential functionality before I code and implement it for real) However that being said if you want automated stuff like for columns, you could just use a text editor with code snippets.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxhead View Post
    Although this may be true for advanced websites, simple stuff is done very well in dreamweaver. If you need a table 5 rows by 5 columns with some text and some styles attached to various bits then you can't go far wrong. I learnt everything i know by having a starting point i.e. some code to look at and pick apart.

    What ever WYSIWYG editor you use I would use the split design/code view as a minimum and try and understand as much of what the design view is doing as possible.

    My 2 peneth

    monkey
    The are no right or wrong answers but just preferences. Even if it was for a table layout, I personally would only use the code window. It is a question of control over the code. But then, I don't use DW (although I have it)

    How nice is the code that it produces (when you do not hand code) it is also up to the way you configure it. Most people leave the default configuration and that doesn't suit their needs.

    Regarding which one is best, if DW or Expressions, I would say DW for just one reason: If you are going to use the design view, DW uses a real browser engine so chances are much higher that your code will work in other browsers too.

  18. #43
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    if you want to pay Dreamweaver CS3 is the best, if not you can use Microsoft Frontage

  19. #44
    SitePoint Wizard boxhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by molona View Post
    The are no right or wrong answers but just preferences. Even if it was for a table layout, I personally would only use the code window. It is a question of control over the code. But then, I don't use DW (although I have it)
    You absolutely correct, it's all about personal pref. I personally have never understood what control an author needs over a 20 row/column table which is not given by DW - seems counter intuitive not to use the built in tools if they do a perfect job, with maybe 1 or 2 tweaks. It would be like creating manual drop shadows in Photoshop!

    Is the Microsoft option any good then? - I always tell people to stay away from any MS authoring tools as they are rubbish (FP and the RTE in SharePoint being my main experiences).
    monkey - the rest is history

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxhead View Post
    You absolutely correct, it's all about personal pref. I personally have never understood what control an author needs over a 20 row/column table which is not given by DW - seems counter intuitive not to use the built in tools if they do a perfect job, with maybe 1 or 2 tweaks. It would be like creating manual drop shadows in Photoshop!

    Is the Microsoft option any good then? - I always tell people to stay away from any MS authoring tools as they are rubbish (FP and the RTE in SharePoint being my main experiences).
    Well, it depends on which kind of table we are talking about... if it is a tabular data table, chances are that I am not doing it manually but programatically because most of the data would be in a database

    I don't use tables for layouts, so I don't have problem with that either... and DIVs are much easier to handle. Most of my layouts only need 5-6 divs, in general.

    Regarding Expressions, I would say that it has had a quite high improvement, although I don't use it and I don't know how it is now, but I still think that DW may be better and more advanced, although for me the real difference comes on the rendering engines in the design view. DW uses a real engine, and that's a lot of difference if you are going to use the design view.

  21. #46
    SitePoint Wizard boxhead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by molona View Post
    Well, it depends on which kind of table we are talking about... if it is a tabular data table, chances are that I am not doing it manually but programatically because most of the data would be in a database

    I don't use tables for layouts, so I don't have problem with that either... and DIVs are much easier to handle. Most of my layouts only need 5-6 divs, in general.

    Regarding Expressions, I would say that it has had a quite high improvement, although I don't use it and I don't know how it is now, but I still think that DW may be better and more advanced, although for me the real difference comes on the rendering engines in the design view. DW uses a real engine, and that's a lot of difference if you are going to use the design view.
    db driven stuff is always best done by hand, but i meant basic data tables. For a newby, stuff like tables, paragraphs, images, links etc are all done perfectly by DW, but I would still recommend a beginner looks at WHAT is being done, so they have the ability to do it themselves. I hardly ever write the code for a href or img myself, dw does the basics of what i need perfectly, even giving me a choice of css styles from my style sheet.

    As for the engine, I never trust them! I look at the design view for the basic design and to easaly find places in my code, but I always test my work in a real browser - I would STRONGLY recommend 2 monitors if you can afford it - can't beleive I used to live without!

    If you would like a real laugh take a look at the SharePoint RTE if you get the chance - I have never seen so many spans around nothing and bold spaces in my life
    monkey - the rest is history

  22. #47
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    Has anyone else used NVU before? It's a free editor and I've been using it for going on 2 years now for my websites and I think it works wonderfully. I think the only times I've had any problems with the code validating is when I've gone and tweaked some things and accidentally left some things off. I started my websites without css at first but once I learned how to do the css, I just went into the source code and cleaned up some things in the html after creating the css file. I haven't really had any of the problems that some have mentioned with other WYSIWYG editors, but then maybe I haven't delved into more advanced stuff, I still do have alot to learn. Has been working great for me so far though.

  23. #48
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    NVU has a extremely good reputation, although I have to say that many people say that the very best editor is Vim, also free. The thing is that Vim is not a WYSIWYG editor, as DW or Expressions (the new FrontPage) are.

    If you are using NVU maybe you would like to have a look to Kompozer which is the "new" version. NVU stopped to be developed and Kompozer is the non-official continuation of the NVU project.
    Last edited by molona; May 12, 2009 at 06:03.

  24. #49
    Follow: @AlexDawsonUK silver trophybronze trophy AlexDawson's Avatar
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    Amaya is good for a WYSIWYG editor, it’s written and distributed by the W3C but no-one seems to use it, lol

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by molona View Post
    NVU has a extremely good reputation, although I have to say that many people say that the very best editor is Vim, also free. The thing is that Vim is not a WYSIWYG editor, as DW or Expressions (the new FrontPage) are.

    If you are using NVU maybe you would like to have a look to Kompozer which is the "new" version. NVU stopped to be developed and Kompozer is the non-official continuation of the NVU project.

    Thanks, I've heard of Kompozer, but I haven't been to the NVU site for so long that I didn't know that it was the newer version of it. I should probably see about updating it.


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