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  1. #1
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    What are H1, H2 & so on in web design?

    Sorry for the stupid question, but I notice that we talk about a lot about the importance of have the right words or title in H1 or H2. What exactly does this mean what is the relevance of it? Iím trying to build my own web site but donít have much experience in the field.

  2. #2
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    HTML defines six levels of headings (H1 through H6). The heading levels can be thought of as levels in an outline, where H1 is the top-level heading that summarises the entire document; H2's are the headings for the main sections of the document; H3's are the subheadings, etc.

    An H1 element can look like this in the HTML markup:
    Code HTML4Strict:
    <h1>Heading Levels in Markup Languages</h1>

    Since headings should provide a very short summary of what follows, search engines may pay extra attention to them. That doesn't mean you should enclose all your page content in an H1, of course, since the SE's see through such attempts.

    But choosing relevant headings can be beneficial, not only for search engine optimisation, but also for your users.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diannes View Post
    Sorry for the stupid question, but I notice that we talk about a lot about the importance of have the right words or title in H1 or H2. What exactly does this mean what is the relevance of it? I’m trying to build my own web site but don’t have much experience in the field.
    The H tags are heading tags that format your text into headings. H1 is the most prominent (largest), H2 the second, and so forth. You need to mind the content of each heading tag, it's probably a good idea. What he is essentially saying is that the search engines look to these tags for relevant meaning for SEO. Don't fill them with junk, essentially. <snip>
    Last edited by AutisticCuckoo; Feb 13, 2009 at 07:25. Reason: Self-promotion removed

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard rguy84's Avatar
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    I would say that Tommy's answer is more correct.Headings go beyond stuff than just better search engine rankings, they give you properly and better syntax/structure base. Which leads to better usability and accessibility.

    I would like to clarify Tommy's reply a hair. He said:
    where H1 is the top-level heading that summarises the entire document;
    You should not wrap the h1 tag around an intro paragraph, rather what is appropriate is what you use in the <title> tag.
    Ryan B | My Blog | Twitter

  5. #5
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

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    Quote Originally Posted by rguy84 View Post
    You should not wrap the h1 tag around an intro paragraph, rather what is appropriate is what you use in the <title> tag.
    By 'summarise' I meant a few words only, not a whole paragraph. Headings should be short and to the point.

    I agree that the <h1> heading should match the <title> element (although the latter may also include the site name).
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane


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