SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 56
  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard ShayneTilley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    1,044
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    New Release: Build Your Own Web Site The Right Way Using HTML & CSS

    Build Your Own Web Site The Right Way Using HTML & CSS, is widely regarded as the definitive beginnerís guide to building web sites. After hundreds of reviews and suggestions from the first edition, weíre very pleased to announce a second edition of Ian Lloyd's best-selling book.

    Ian has used his understanding of cutting edge advances in web development to enhance the book, so itís compatible with all web browsers (including IE8) and incorporates new tools such as Google Analytics.

    In short, the ultimate beginnerís guide just got better!

    So, whatís in the book?

    If youíre a newbie to web design, but youíre passionate about learning to build web sites, then Build Your Own Web Site The Right Way Using HTML & CSS, 2nd Edition is a must-have. In this easy-to-follow guide youíll learn how to build a web site the best way possible -- doing it yourself!

    Ian will help you along, but by following this step-by-step guide to building an example web site, youíll find that the training wheels will be off before you know it. Youíll start from scratch, learning which basic tools you need to get started (text editors, web browsers, and FTP clients), and by the end of the book youíll be ready to add some real flair to your fully functioning web site.

    With this book, youíll learn how to implement features that are crucial to web site development, such as:

    • easy to use navigation
    • professional-looking headers
    • regularly updated News/Events pages
    • a Contact Us page
    • a simple Image gallery
    • a search engine that covers your site, as well as related sites
    • and much more ...


    About the author...

    Ian is a UK-based senior web designer/developer who has written or co-written many web development books, including SitePointís The Ultimate HTML Reference. He currently runs accessify.com (a web accessibility site that he started in 2002) and is a regular speaker at web development conferences such as South By Southwest (SXSW).

    You can sample three chapters free , or grab yourself a copy of the printed or PDF version of the book for just $29.95.

    Listen to what others thought about Ian's book:

    Boagworld's review of Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way Using HTML and CSS

    What Andy Clarke thinks of Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way Using HTML and CSS

    Dave McNally's review of Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way Using HTML and CSS

    Rissington Podcast reviews Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way Using HTML and CSS
    Shayne Tilley

    My slightly left of center thoughts on
    marketing, business and life in general.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Zealot quantum physics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bombay
    Posts
    152
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes,cascading style sheets are the way to now,html is also obviously tremendously Popular,but more and more webmasters are looking to build and develop their website(s) using cascading style sheets.
    Some even use mixtures of hypertext markup Language and cascading styles.

  3. #3
    om nom nom nom Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,266
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Only thing I warned others about when recommending this book (first edition) was that it started one out in fake XHTML. I'd almost say one should start out with HTML4.01 until one knows the difference between real and fake XHTML.

    Still, this book ++

  4. #4
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm really happy with this book - I've been working through it for about two weeks now, and learnt so much vital information. Previously I built sites with tables in kompozer, but now I'm confident to build my layout purely with CSS. I've redesigned one site and it looks and performs so much better.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ankh-Morpork
    Posts
    12,158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by quantum physics View Post
    Some even use mixtures of hypertext markup Language and cascading styles.
    I'd say that's pretty much all of them, except for the dinosaurs who still believe HTML is a page layout language. You can't create a site with CSS alone, since it's a styling language. Although, in theory, you might do something like the silly example below, you'd still need an HTML document to link to the CSS.
    Code CSS:
    body:before {content:"Hello, World"}

    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    Only thing I warned others about when recommending this book (first edition) was that it started one out in fake XHTML.
    They must have fixed that for the new edition, since Shayne said,

    Quote Originally Posted by ShayneTilley View Post
    Ian has used his understanding of cutting edge advances in web development to enhance the book, so it’s compatible with all web browsers (including IE8)
    Since IE8, like it's predecessors, doesn't support XHTML I can only assume that the new edition uses honest HTML. Right, Shayne?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    I'd almost say one should start out with HTML4.01 until one knows the difference between real and fake XHTML.
    There's no 'almost' about it as far as I'm concerned. In fact, there's no reason to use XHTML at all, unless you're going to do some very specific things for niche audiences.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  6. #6
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    30
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    this book really helped me in building my first website..this is definitely helpful

  7. #7
    SitePoint Member gsdbuy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've redesigned one site and it looks and performs so much better.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    754
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AutisticCuckoo View Post
    There's no 'almost' about it as far as I'm concerned. In fact, there's no reason to use XHTML at all, unless you're going to do some very specific things for niche audiences.
    I couldn't agree less!

    - XHTML is super easy to parse with anything like a script that might snip out bits of content.
    - Learning XHTML, even if it's not as semantically pure from the mime-type side of things, is still a really good step towards using XML generally.
    - We have content-negotiation for this, so you can serve text/html just to the dodgy browsers. It's not that hard!
    - And that content negotiation thing is absolutely, positively, OK per the W3C. I can't post links yet cause I'm a noob but it's at www dot w3 dot org/TR/xhtml-media-types/

    'application/xhtml+xml' SHOULD be used for serving XHTML documents to XHTML user agents. Authors who wish to support both XHTML and HTML user agents MAY utilize content negotiation by serving HTML documents as 'text/html' and XHTML documents as 'application/xhtml+xml'.
    Brothercake wrote a great article for us just last year about this at http://www.sitepoint.com/article/htm...oes-it-matter/

  9. #9
    Guru in training bronze trophy SoulScratch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,838
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raena View Post
    I couldn't agree less!

    Brothercake wrote a great article for us just last year about this at http://www.sitepoint.com/article/htm...oes-it-matter/
    AutisticCuckoo/Tommy has been discussing this YEARS ago

    http://www.autisticcuckoo.net/archiv.../xhtml-is-dead
    http://www.autisticcuckoo.net/archiv...9/06/bad-xhtml
    http://www.autisticcuckoo.net/archiv.../pretend-xhtml
    http://www.autisticcuckoo.net/archiv...nt-negotiation
    Cross browser css bugs

    Dan Schulz you will be missed

  10. #10
    SitePoint Zealot atetlaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    171
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Stomme poes View Post
    Only thing I warned others about when recommending this book (first edition) was that it started one out in fake XHTML. I'd almost say one should start out with HTML4.01 until one knows the difference between real and fake XHTML.

    Still, this book ++
    A slight correction: the book uses standards compliant XHTML code, there's nothing fake about it. If in your opinion, it becomes fake when served as text/html, then fine, but the book doesn't get into discussing content type.

    I don't think it's a topic suitable for beginners, and you can be sure that if they know XHTML they will be able to write HTML with no problems.

  11. #11
    SitePoint Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    754
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulScratch View Post
    AutisticCuckoo/Tommy has been discussing this YEARS ago
    Yes, I'm quite aware. I have been around the block a few times

    I guess I've just ceased to see the issue as a Big Deal. It's like saying you should never ever use IE conditional comments because they are a filthy hack and not 'pure'. Which is true, but they're also super practical, and the alternative is not really nice.

    Really, it's not something I'd "consider harmful." Not in the real world.

  12. #12
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ankh-Morpork
    Posts
    12,158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by raena View Post
    - XHTML is super easy to parse with anything like a script that might snip out bits of content.
    Yes, but that's only allowed if it's served as an application of XML, in which case it's not supported by Internet Explorer (any version).

    Quote Originally Posted by raena View Post
    - Learning XHTML, even if it's not as semantically pure from the mime-type side of things, is still a really good step towards using XML generally.
    XML, per se, is about as complicated as a piece of string. There's not all that much to learn. The semantics of HTML (and XHTML), on the other hand, is something important. There's no difference between them, semantically, though. XHTML1 is merely a reformulation of HTML4 as an application of XML. In fact, the XHTML 1.0 specification doesn't go into the semantics; it just refers to the HTML 4.01 spec for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by raena View Post
    - We have content-negotiation for this, so you can serve text/html just to the dodgy browsers. It's not that hard!
    And if you can serve it as HTML you're not using any XHTML features, so you might as well use HTML in the first place. Content negotiation is just a waste of time, unless you really have two separate versions of everything.

    Quote Originally Posted by atetlaw View Post
    If in your opinion, it becomes fake when served as text/html, then fine
    My opinion has nothing to do with it. Anything served as text/html must be parsed and interpreted as HTML, according to RFC 2854. A user agent that parses markup served as text/html as XHTML is broken.

    Quote Originally Posted by atetlaw View Post
    but the book doesn't get into discussing content type.
    You're doing your readers a great disservice then. You're fooling them into believing that they're really using XHTML, when in fact they're not. As far as user agents are concerned, they're using invalid HTML and relying on browser bugs and unspecified error handling.

    I know several people at SitePoint really like XHTML markup and that you don't want to hear that it's pointless. But wishing that something were true doesn't make it so.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  13. #13
    om nom nom nom Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,266
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by atlaw
    A slight correction: the book uses standards compliant XHTML code, there's nothing fake about it. If in your opinion, it becomes fake when served as text/html, then fine, but the book doesn't get into discussing content type.

    I don't think it's a topic suitable for beginners, and you can be sure that if they know XHTML they will be able to write HTML with no problems.
    ^Could also be the other way around (learning strict HTML4.01 means you can pretty much write the XHTML-as-HTML as well), and I do agree it's not something that should be presented until either the end of the book or simply another book. The "Fake" is because the name (XHTML) suggests... something with X. XML, Xtended, Xtreme! Which it isn't for a standard web site a newb is making because they are indeed still sending it as text/html. I've even seen the myth wandering the InterTubes like a street preacher saying you can't have RSS/Atom on your site if it's HTML4.

    Ian's book (first edition) was the first book I actually learned anything on. Before that, I learned little bits and pieces of tags (curse that w3cschools.com which happily explains a tag but doesn't show you how to make an actual PAGE from them : ) and a few rules on semantics from Dan and a few other crusties on another forum-- in fact I found Ian's book through Dan (Schulz).

    I liked the way Ian just starts you out with a Doctype so you have one and explains what it is and does later. Only thing is, because of both Ian's book and the HTML Utopia book (second and pretty much last book I learned much from) start one off in XHTML, I believed all that stuff about how it was faster better stronger harder and somehow "more strict" (it is the author who is strict, not the DTD, and I do kinda wish something like that was said to me right at the beginning, a warning that browsers accept a lot of crap and the DTD's were written with unrealised goals in mind) or "more advanced" and I was glad to learn the difference-- Anne van Kesteren had linked to Hixie's page or Jukka Korpela's page once and one links to the other.... I stumbled into the debate and was like, whoa-- why wasn't I warned??

    Fortunately Ian's book starts the HTML out in such a way that half of Hixie's arguments shouldn't matter because it's HTML generally the Right Way which goes a long way but it was just disconcerting to learn how things really were, after building a few pages.

    And after learning that I cannot use anything XML (and also, I have no need to, I'd possibly consider it if I were doing all that neat-o stuff on an applications page and to hell with Microsoft users re intranet or something) that real XHTML was supposed to offer, I have since switched to starting all new sites in HTML4.01 Strict, though written to follow as many other rules that would belong by XML/XHTML as reasonably possible (re named character entities enz).

    As a newb, while I wouldn't have wanted to jump into the debate at the beginning when I just want to know how to build a webSite, I kinda didn't like being set out on the wrong foot, so to speak. Though there was a time about a year ago where whether I used XHTML or HTML4 depended on which side of the bed I woke up from, but now I feel like my older pages are unnecessarily "dressed up".

    So, I'll still continue recommending this book to people starting out, and I will still do it while mentioning that the X is just pretty : )

    It's like saying you should never ever use IE conditional comments because they are a filthy hack and not 'pure'. Which is true, but they're also super practical, and the alternative is not really nice.
    Maybe because M$ actually encourages people to use them, I haven't seen the total wars over that one like X/HTML does ; )

  14. #14
    Posts rarely lloydi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Swindon UK
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi folks,

    Just a quick note to say that I'm aware that this is a sticky point for some people, and always will be. It was something that was considered for both the first and second editions. I honestly can't remember all the discussions that we had at the time, but from memory promoting it as XHTML was deemed more of a winner than HTML, based on competition, perception etc.

    That said, the issue is covered in the book, but very briefly. In earlier drafts, the details were covered in ... erm ... more detail .... but the feeling was that this would just lose the target audience, so it was left to a brief mention at the beginning and another at the end, in the final chapter (the 'what could you learn next' part). There's a link at that point to the HTML vs XHTML page on the HTML reference.

    Part of the reason for using XHTML (but not getting into the nitty gritty) was to foster good markup practice, e.g. case-sensitivity, properly closing tags etc. It's arguably easier to do that than teach HTML4 and then say that you need to tidy up your markup for other markup languages later.

    For what it's worth, I have a version of accessify.com that I rebuilt waiting in the wings - but I still seem to lack the time to finish it off! - which has been marked up as .... HTML 4.01
    Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way!
    A beginners' HTML/CSS book with web standards at its heart
    The Ultimate HTML Reference
    A complete reference, in glorious hardback

  15. #15
    om nom nom nom Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,266
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    so it was left to a brief mention at the beginning and another at the end, in the final chapter (the 'what could you learn next' part).
    Sounds like a good way to do it in a beginner's book. And I did not consider that someone with a strict HTML4 document isn't going to get cussed out like they should for a forgotten (but legal) unclosed tag like a p or li while the XHTML DTD will have the validator do so.

    It's arguably easier to do that than teach HTML4 and then say that you need to tidy up your markup for other markup languages later.
    It's arguable, though one could teach "tidy" HTML4... but again yeah the Spellchecker then would not catch some untidyness due to the DTD.

    Again, I'm glad you just start with A doctype and get to what it means and does later in the book. When I first saw that chunk of geeky-looking text on a web page my first thought was, "copy, paste, hope", lawlz.

  16. #16
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question

    I am using the Build Your Own Web Site Book- 2nd edition. All was going along great but now I can't seem to get the web page examples which the book has been helping me build, link to the External CSS file I created. I checked and rechecked that I copied the information correctly, I also checked against the code archieve so I don't think the problem is mis-typed information. I also cleared the temp internet files thinking it was the caching issue described on page 85 but still won't work. I am kind of stuck at this point, is it possible that my browser doesn't support CSS (Mozilla Firefox)?? Any suggestions are appreciated, thanks.

    Bob

  17. #17
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ankh-Morpork
    Posts
    12,158
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Firefox definitely supports CSS, so that's not the problem.

    Check the URL again, to make sure you didn't mis-spell the path to your CSS file. Remember that some operating systems have case-sensitive filesystems, too.

    If you have href="style.css" the file must be named style.css and reside in the same directory as the HTML file.

    If you have href="css/style.css the file must be in a subdirectory named css, relative to the directory that contains the HTML file.

    If you have href="../style.css" the file must be in the parent directory of the directory that contains the HTML file.

    If you have href="/style.css" the file must be in the root directory of your hard drive.

    And so on.

    Also, you could look in the Error Console (in the Tools menu) to see if Firefox has experienced any problems with your style sheet. Make sure you select to display All messages.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

  18. #18
    Posts rarely lloydi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Swindon UK
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bobwit View Post
    Is it possible that my browser doesn't support CSS (Mozilla Firefox)?? Any suggestions are appreciated, thanks.

    Bob
    Nope, that won't be it. It's probably something simple, little but difficult to spot. Best advice for now is to copy/paste the HTML doc and paste it here (feel free to send me a private message to nudge me if you don't get a response)
    Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way!
    A beginners' HTML/CSS book with web standards at its heart
    The Ultimate HTML Reference
    A complete reference, in glorious hardback

  19. #19
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nice book. tempting to have one, but I just had one question? was the book all about manual coding on html? I mean I used alot my html editor on doing my web layout.
    Gadget Inspectors Offers latest hi tech gadget reviews.

  20. #20
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sure, css is the way to go, but you can't disregard html can you?

  21. #21
    om nom nom nom Stomme poes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    10,266
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Nice book. tempting to have one, but I just had one question? was the book all about manual coding on html? I mean I used alot my html editor on doing my web layout.
    It assumes you have a regular, not fancy, text editor, like whatever came default with your OS (so likely Notepad for Windows). So yes, it's hand-coding. Everything you learn in that book can pretty much be then used in any other text-editor, because frankly you don't want them writing their own code for you anyway.
    Robots (software) write code like they dance-- very awkwardly. And they fall down a lot too.

    Sure, css is the way to go, but you can't disregard html can you?
    This book assumes you know neither and you learn both. Though the CSS is beginners, not super thorough. Just enough for some basic placement of elements. But you build a single web site with this book-- thus learning HTML and CSS, the right way, the first time. Well, the basics of both. After this book there's still more to learn but at least you have the basics to be able to come onto a forum and ask an intelligent question and much more likely to understand the answer someone gives you.

  22. #22
    SitePoint Addict Iceman90's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    391
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I teach an introduction to web design class at a local tech school, and this book has become my mandatory course textbook. It's the best introductory book on the market!

  23. #23
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    CSS is best option to develop your site if you more concerned about SEO as google loves CSS. But css is little complicated than HTML as we need to cross check site layout in different browsers. I hope it is explained in this book.

  24. #24
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    35
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hostingmaster View Post
    CSS is best option to develop your site if you more concerned about SEO as google loves CSS.
    I wouldn't get carried away with that point. There are some pretty old, badly coded sites / pages that rank rather well. Yes, structuring the HTML properly using header tags etc. sufficiently will help, but provided a page is indexable whether the page is CSS or table-based really has no bearing.

    That said, if you're coding from scratch definately go with CSS all the way.
    Visit your one stop shop for quality home improvements in the UK!
    Windows | Doors | Conservatories
    Roofline | Kitchens | Garage Doors

  25. #25
    Posts rarely lloydi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Swindon UK
    Posts
    620
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman90 View Post
    I teach an introduction to web design class at a local tech school, and this book has become my mandatory course textbook. It's the best introductory book on the market!
    I think I love you! But don't tell the wife (it's our third anniversary today, so professing love for other people is not exactly 'de rigeur') :-)
    Build Your Own Web Site the Right Way!
    A beginners' HTML/CSS book with web standards at its heart
    The Ultimate HTML Reference
    A complete reference, in glorious hardback


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •