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Thread: RoR vs Django?

  1. #1
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    RoR vs Django?

    I am a casual user of php, perl, and python. I have tried Django, I have never tried RoR. I would hate to learn another language and/or framework, just to be disappointed again.

    I like python, but the frameworks seem to take an excessive amount of on-going configuration. I never could get django setup and working correctly. Is it worth learning Ruby?

  2. #2
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    Rails

    Pros:
    - Fast to setup and get working with.
    - Lots of code is generated for you automatically, letting you work on the problem at hand rather than worrying about application structure and stuff.
    - Lots of documentation.

    Cons:
    - Arguably slow, not easily scalable, no (production-ready) Apache module. ('Mongrel' behind a load-balancer? No thanks.)
    - Ruby is a weird language. It's like a ******* mix of the best and worst parts of PHP and Python.

    Django

    Pros:
    - Pretty easy to setup.
    - Comes with a really nice, customisable administration panel right out of the box. (You can convert this into the admin backend of your site)
    - Python is a really clean language.

    Cons:
    - Worst documentation ever. (Disclaimer: I've been using Django for over a year and own two books on it. 1.0 came out and broke everything. The documentation is still AWFUL.)
    - Since 1.0 came out recently, a lot of the more useful plugins (e.g. taggables) haven't been updated to use it.


    My $0.02.

  3. #3
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    I.M.H.O, I would go with Rails. I have used Django for about a year, and hate the syntax.

  4. #4
    Guru in training bronze trophy SoulScratch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooper.semantics View Post
    I.M.H.O, I would go with Rails. I have used Django for about a year, and hate the syntax.
    You hate Python syntax? As opposed to Ruby?
    Cross browser css bugs

    Dan Schulz you will be missed

  5. #5
    SitePoint Addict ruby-lang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoulScratch View Post
    You hate Python syntax? As opposed to Ruby?
    Syntax is a matter of taste. Personally, I think Ruby feels more object-oriented than Python, but I can see how someone with a strong Python background may find Ruby too heavy on the sigils.

    Anyway, back on topic. Django isn't the only Python web framework in the market. TurboGears was heavily influenced by RoR, and may fit your requirements better.

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    I have used RoR and PHP's CodeIgniter pretty heavily. I use Ruby as my system script language until and will until I can refactor it into python.

    I am leaning towards and have been interesting in Pylons as Django feels a bit too awkward.

    The biggest issues you will probably have with RoR is that it's not Windows friendly. To get it to work on Server 2003 I have to run ISAPI_REWRITE with a reverse proxy pushing it to mongrel running as a service.

    The FastCGI through IIS 6.0 just didn't really work well. And in all honestly, I don't like RoR running as fastcgi through Lighttpd or apache on Linux. Reverse proxy is the only way to go unless you do Jruby on top of a J2EE app server.

    Had their been a good 64bit binary for Ruby for Windows then I could have tested to see if fastcgi and the IIS 7 rewrite module worked well for ruby as it does for PHP and Python and their MVC programs.

    On linux it just comes down to a matter of taste. But each ruby instance on windows takes about 18mb. That could be better. But you trade resources for good code ( arguable I am sure ).

    I think Python is a bit more close to C than Ruby in terms of flexibility. There are things I'd do in C++ that I find a way to do in Python that are impossible in Ruby and PHP.


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