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  1. #26
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    Ok let me clarify. Books are good for beginners just trying to find out the basic hello world and figuring out what the language is and maybe some more basics. Books cant replace coding (IMO) no matter what anybody says.


  2. #27
    SitePoint Evangelist jonbey's Avatar
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    OK, my tip:

    Download an open source template. Open the index.html and style.css (or similar) in PSPad (or another text editor with colour coding of the code) and then start to look at how the two are linked. Play with changing colours first, for different areas, then try adjusting margins, padding, borders etc. Just make little changes. Play with it, and everytime something goes wrong, just hit ctrl-Z and then try to work out how you broke it. Either ask us in the CSS forum, or refer to a book. Probably for this method, a book that is well indexed and in a logical format is essential. Probably an ebook, something easier to search, may be best.

  3. #28
    In memoriam gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy Dan Schulz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BBoardX View Post
    Ok let me clarify. Books are good for beginners just trying to find out the basic hello world and figuring out what the language is and maybe some more basics. Books cant replace coding (IMO) no matter what anybody says.

    Ah, I see where you're coming from. Of course, I have to respectfully disagree - to a degree. A lot of advanced topics are covered in books, especially the hybrid cookbook/reference ones. The online resources are good for learning them piecemeal (one at a time), but nothing beats having the code and explainations/instructions in a book; especially when you're offline and don't have Internet access (or access to a computer for that matter).

    That being said, you do have a point. Just reading (whether it's online or in print) won't make you a better coder. You still have to apply the lessons that the resources teach and become familiar with how they work before you can claim to have actual experience with them.

  4. #29
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    Yes! But I disagree with you a little. Nothing advanced can be memorized and be put in a real program by reading a book. At least for me. I would have to research it, and learn how to implement it in the current program. Some books just tell you how to do something, and never when


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