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  1. #1
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    How much do you usually charge to do PSD->HTML

    I have done this (Link) for 15$ and this one (Link , this one has a roll-over menu) for 20$.
    Both of them were finished within 1 day.
    Do you think it was a reasonable price?
    Also can you show me some of your creations and the prices you charged your customers? Any help would be appreciated

  2. #2
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    Did you code it or design it and is that price per hour?

  3. #3
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    i don't know where your based but geographic location is going to play a huge role in determining whether $15 is a large or small amount of money.

  4. #4
    In memoriam gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy Dan Schulz's Avatar
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    shadow, what your'e asking for generally runs afoul of our self promotion guidelines. However, in the interest of fairness, I'll leave this thread open as long as people don't post their own portfolios and rates.

    Now, with that out of the way, I use a simple pricing model for (almost) everything I do. I determine how many hours (in 15 minute increments) it'll take me to do a project and then I multiply that by my hourly rate (which I'm not going to reveal here).

    There are some wonderful articles here on SitePoint (and I don't mean the forums - I mean in the "Articles" tab in the main menu) you may want to check out. They'll show you how to set your prices and compete on value rather than by the hour. Yeah, I know that just contradicted what I said, but I'm not cheap so I'm able to factor the "value" into my hourly rate in addition to taxes, expenses and of course profit. (A good rule of thumb I devised was to charge no less than $60/hour so that every minute you actually bill is worth a dollar.)

    Hmm... you just gave me a few more ideas...

  5. #5
    SitePoint Wizard Stomme poes's Avatar
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    I goof off so much while doing something (almost like multi-tasking, but not really) that I could only charge for amount of work I did, not per hour or per any amount of time. Sometimes I churn code out and the Finnish folk metal is running good, and other times I'm sitting there, browsing forums and reading unrelated (still HTML/CSS tho) stuff. Or looking at what I've got and think about it. That's not work. It all mixes together.
    What I'd do if I worked per project was charge based on amount of work and the length of time to do the project. The shorter the deadline, the harder I'd be working, so the more I'd charge.
    Features the client wants is a big one. Flash, JS, any extras that require more thinking and organising first, or particular outdated browsers or strange UA's people want supported (like that funky windows browser they were using in space that didn't support JS or whatever), that should cost more.

  6. #6
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    I think the best thing you can do is charge by the hour. Sure, you have to discipline yourself a bit and make sure you're not browsing forums or playing games, but it's a lot more satisfying knowing that you're getting paid for every bit of work you put into it. As for how much to charge, you really just have to figure that out. It's going to depend on a lot of things, like how experienced you are and how fast you work.

    I would suggest starting with a low price, and go with it until you get more work than you can handle. Then up your price a little bit to shake off the low-budget clients. Eventually you'll work your way up to a price that works just right for you.

  7. #7
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    That sounds a little cheap. You may want to charge more.
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  8. #8
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    The best way to charge is to find out how much a client is willing to pay. If they'll pay you $100 an hour, take the $100. If they'll only pay $15 an hour and you can't get any $100 an hour projects, do the $15 an hour project.

    Never list your rates on a website. You should always price jobs on how much a client is willing to pay, and you work that out by communicating with them.

    Relating to Stomme poes, I am the same. I work a bit on something, get sick of it - do something else, then come back to what I was doing. I don't try to figure out exactly how much I've worked, and how many minutes, etc. I just do the work and charge what I think is fair. Of course I take time into account, but I don't sit there with a calculator.

    If the client wants an hourly rate and I am charging $50 per hour, I'll just charge what I think is fair and tell them it took "x" amount of hours -- which is just a guesstimate. See, the price and hours are all relative anyway.

    Another thing to take into account is the difficulty of the project. If it's something baby simple that you can do with your eyes closed (ie: something that closely matches your skills), you can get this stuff done much quicker and make more money out of it. However, if you're much slower at something (ie: it doesn't quite match your skills and requires research and harder work), then you'll make less money out of it.

    You should determine all the factors above and just charge what you think is fair.

  9. #9
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    Sorry MrLeN, but I respectfully disagree...

    Quote Originally Posted by MrLeN View Post
    The best way to charge is to find out how much a client is willing to pay. If they'll pay you $100 an hour, take the $100. If they'll only pay $15 an hour and you can't get any $100 an hour projects, do the $15 an hour project.

    Never list your rates on a website. You should always price jobs on how much a client is willing to pay, and you work that out by communicating with them.
    Putting myself in the client's position, I'm not going to hire someone who is taking advantage of my budget. How much you charge is a HUGE factor for a client in determining whether to hire you. Now, you don't necessarily need to be advertising your rate, but when a client asks you what you charge, you need to be able to tell them.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrLeN View Post
    If the client wants an hourly rate and I am charging $50 per hour, I'll just charge what I think is fair and tell them it took "x" amount of hours -- which is just a guesstimate. See, the price and hours are all relative anyway.
    That might work for the one-man candy stand down the street, but I can't imagine any respectful company is going to be okay with you "guesstimating" how many hours you've worked. When it comes time to invoice your client, they're going to want a list of what you did and how long it took.

    Just my thoughts...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ethayne View Post
    Sorry MrLeN, but I respectfully disagree...



    Putting myself in the client's position, I'm not going to hire someone who is taking advantage of my budget. How much you charge is a HUGE factor for a client in determining whether to hire you. Now, you don't necessarily need to be advertising your rate, but when a client asks you what you charge, you need to be able to tell them.



    That might work for the one-man candy stand down the street, but I can't imagine any respectful company is going to be okay with you "guesstimating" how many hours you've worked. When it comes time to invoice your client, they're going to want a list of what you did and how long it took.

    Just my thoughts...
    My post was good advice. I am sorry you don't understand it.

  11. #11
    I hate Spammers mobyme's Avatar
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    MrLeN is right on the button and it works both ways. You know sometimes as a company you have put in more hours than it would be fair to charge; other times you have completed things a lot quicker than you thought you would, but you charge a rate that is reasonable for the job. We run ten people here and nothing is done absolutely by the clock; you may very well do other things in a morning or an afternoon but if the majority of the time was spent on xy project then that is the one that gets billed for the morning or afternoon. You would spend so much time clocking in and off projects you would drive yourself crazy and besides which; who is going to pay for the "I've hit a brick wall times". We have different rates for different clients and work slightly cheaper for long standing customers as a way of giving them a loyalty discount. New clients tend to have to pay a bit more. It's the way of the world.
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  12. #12
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    hi

    i've just clicked on the links in your original post to have a look what you were refering to but both links appear to be broken?

  13. #13
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy
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    Assuming 1 day is equal to 8 hrs your hourly rate is about $1.88. If you can live on $1.88/hr then more power to you…

    Then again… your work might be worth just that…

    Assuming this your rate I'm guessing you are either doing this as a hobby/side job or are still in highschool/college with a support system – correct?

    If that is not the case then unless you've only been doing this for a couple of weeks then you probably should up your pay to at least minimum wage.

  14. #14
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    It is is WC3 compliant, with the CSS rendering the same on all browsers and operating systems, I would charge $100-$200 per page, depending on the complexity of the design
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  15. #15
    SitePoint Addict Divisive Cotton's Avatar
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    One of the first questions I would ask is, What's your budget?

    That you can gauge where they are coming from... and then take the discussion from there
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