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View Poll Results: DOes having better equipment make you a better photographer?

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  • Yes

    6 16.22%
  • No

    18 48.65%
  • Maybe...

    13 35.14%
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  1. #26
    SitePoint Addict kiduka's Avatar
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    A photographer is just like any other artist so better equipment won't make much of a difference. From what I now, the photographer has to be able to orchestrate the image his taking the picture of. So in an example of a model, the photographer has to tell the model to move in certain ways to capture the best image

  2. #27
    Keep Moving Forward gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy
    Shaun(OfTheDead)'s Avatar
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    woo hoo!... Now that is a great question!


    I'd say it's a combination of the two, but it starts with the photographer first, especially for studio work and still-lives.

    I'm talking about lights more than cameras, by the way.

    As your skill improves, you'll likely find that the equiptment you've been using just can't give you the effect you're seeing in your head. Yeah, you'll be able to fake it to a point, like say using a window and mirrors, but then you'd be limited by what's available and what time of day it is. Not to mention the labour it would take to force-fit what you have into what you need, and all the time in Photoshop to hide, enhance, colour-balance, etc.

    When you reach that point, I think it's time to graduate to the next level of equiptment you can afford. And so it goes.

    In that way, I'll say yes, better equiptment can make you better. But only if you're at the skill-level where you can exploit the better equiptment. If you're not ready for it, then it's just a waste of cash.




    Last edited by Shaun(OfTheDead); May 15, 2009 at 07:51.
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  3. #28
    Keep Moving Forward gold trophysilver trophybronze trophy
    Shaun(OfTheDead)'s Avatar
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    When it comes to shooting people though, I'd say better communication-skills and experience matters more.




    Trying to fill the unforgiving minute
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  4. #29
    SitePoint Zealot enyasmith's Avatar
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    Though you are expert photographer if you use a bad instrument the photos will still bad. To get a better result of photos it is necessary to have a better equipment. Yes, of course, just using a better equipment does not make a better photographer. To be a good photographer it depend on the person.

  5. #30
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    Depends on what you want to shoot.
    Some things don't need to be expensive to gain great results. Just simple equipment does the trick are alright.

  6. #31
    SitePoint Guru bronze trophy Slackr's Avatar
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    Anyone who wants to read something interesting about this should check out Ken Rockwell's website. I think he states a great case for why we fall for all sorts of advertising hype without realising it. As uneducated human's many of us are at the mercy of year's of large companies advertising dollars telling us that more megapixels automatically = better. When learning photography I bought a fully manual film camera and it forced me to learn and not rely on a computer chip to do all the thinking for me.

  7. #32
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    well, yes a better instrument would really develop the skills of its user. So as a professional, we must first evaluate our needs before buying a certain tool we need. Try considering quality over the price...

  8. #33
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    I voted Maybe.

    Better equipment helps, but creativity is up to the photographer.

    Some camera has better color output and produce less noise.

  9. #34
    SitePoint Zealot cpace1983's Avatar
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    No matter what in life, it is always 80% man, and 20% equipment. A bad photographer can have a 1D MkIII, and still have terrible quality photos compared to a good photographer with a Rebel series camera.
    I am a Freelance Linux Consultant.
    I offer flat rate Linux support, as well as hourly support.
    Feel free to visit my blog, Ramblings of a Linux Administrator.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Member tanmaysnv's Avatar
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    Your mind is the best equipment you have. You may want to pick up a tripod some time soon for the lower light images. OTher then that you should just keep making images.

    Some time down the road when you happen to have a lot of cash on hand you may want to buy a good book or two to help understand the cameras out there

  11. #36
    SitePoint Enthusiast macfoto's Avatar
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    In general I wouldn't say it is the camera, the person needs to know how to take good pictures and that can be applied to a variety of cameras. That said it may affect what you can do , a camera that just provides small pictures won't be good for large prints or you might need equipment like having a long lens if you want to take pictures of wildlife. Perhaps a good combination is knowing the principles of taking good pictures and knowing how to effectively the camera you use.
    David Voth
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    The Macfoto Life All About Macs, Web Design and Photography

  12. #37
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    Good equipment opens up opportunities. While it won't make you a good photographer, it certainly goes a long way.

    Every time I get myself a new lens, my pictures improve. I first got a telephoto lens, and I could take incredible pictures of animals far off. Then I got a wide-angle lens, and I could take incredible pictures of buildings and the sky. Then I got a macro lens and could take incredible pictures of things so small, you otherwise wouldn't see them.

    In retrospect, none of these simply would have been possible if I didn't have the right equipment.


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