I'm probably going to just be stubborn with this and keep going my way, but who knows? I'd like to run this by folks here first:

I have a page with a list of real estate companies.

With the contact page of the company who owns the website, I ended up using a list for the contact info-- not sure it was the best choice but it ended up looking like this:

Code:
	  <h1>Contact</h1>
          <p class="contact">Voor meer informatie, neem contact op met:</p>
 	  <ul id="contactlijst">
	    <li>Company name<br />
		Street 10<br />
		#### XX City</li>
	    <li>Postbus ###<br />
	        #### XX City<br />
		Nederland<br />
	        Tel : #########<br />
	        Fax: #########3<br />
		<a href="#">mailto:blah</a></li>
	    <li>Handelsregister nr: #######<br />
		Fortis Bank Nederland: ########<br />
		Iban: NL32 FTSB ########<br />
		BIC: ########</li>
	   </ul>
The original design (done with divs and <BR> all over the place) needed to be kept. So, there's a chunk for regular address, space, chunk for mailing address, space, chunk for important numbers. So, it looked like an address made up of a list of three parts. I'm uneasy with the br's but their placement is due to postal convention mostly, which is I think part of the content. Surely the above information would make a bit less sense if it was all in one long line (though you could figure it out).
I didn't make every line a list item because an address itself isn't really a list. Each item isn't actually independent, just on a new line. So, kinda feeling my way here. Someone would have done good to invent a tag called "address" but for postal addresses, not "Site Written By Joe" (which I don't even consider an address, but should be called <author> or something).

So going on the assumption that I was ok there, I went ahead and ran into a list of companies and their addresses. Again, I considered the group of real estate companies to be a list, but their individual postal address lines aren't independent enough to be list items.

Code:
          <div id="makelaar">
	    <ul>
              <li><h2>Company Name</h2>
	        <a href=website address"><img src="banner.gif" width="234" height="60" alt="[Company name and motto]" /></a> 
      	        Street 14-C<br />
      	        P.O. box ####<br />
      	        #### XX City<br /> 
      	        Tel: 0031 (0)#########<br />
      	        Fax: 0031 (0)#########<br /> 
      	        <a href="website again">website</a> 
      	        <a href="mailto:blah">info@blah</a>
	      </li>
	      <li><h2>Company Name</h2>
      	          Bleh Bleh<br /> 
      	          Lot 16 street B<br /> 
      		  City<br /> 
      	          ####-### Portugal<br /> 
      		  Tel: 00351 #########<br /> 
      		  Tel: 00351 #########<br /> 
      		  <a href="webaddress</a> 
      		  <a href="mailto:blah">info@blah</a> 
	      </li>
	      <li><h2>Company Name</h2> 
      		  Street 15<br />
		  #### XX City<br /> 
		  Tel: 0031 (0)########<br /> 
	    	  fax: 0031 (0)########<br /> 
      	 	  <a href="website/">website</a> 
		  <a href="mailto:blah">info@blah</a> 
	      </li>
etc...
</ul>
</div>
I'm not sure about making the company name a header... it's a name, which is a title, which is often a header.

Other ways I've thought of doing it is just divboxes stacked on top of each other, without a list... I've thought of just wrapping every line in something like a p even though they aren't paragraphs, but the newline of the content is preserved. Speaking of preserved, I've even thought of the pre tag.

Comments? Is there a better way I can do this? I'm also still figuring out what I'm doing with the banners-- some companies have a banner which on the old site was displayed to the right of the company name, though more companies than not have no banner.

Also, while I have no br's after the website link, thinking I could make those anchors display: block, that means I'm saying content-wise they do not need to be on new lines. And I'm not sure if they do or not. Usually on addresses, business cards and the like, each web address is on a new line. Not sure if this is old enough to be considered a "typographic convention" or not. If it is, I'd add <br /> after the website link as well.