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  1. #26
    SitePoint Zealot Rexibit's Avatar
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    A bachelor's in business administration could net you $40k-$60k per year depending on where you are located, and also what kind of work you are doing. A master's in business administration could net you $40k-$80k+ per year with the same factors.

    The money is not what you should focus on when deciding to pursue this degree, the knowledge is what is important. No person in today's world will be solely working under someone with no one that they have to manage. Everyone will have some form of management responsibility that they must tend to. Knowing how to manage people, deal with legal issues, understand accounting, and knowing how to market your company is important. This is what you gain from having a BA degree.

    I personally am getting my bachelor's in Management Information Systems. It was a combined BA and CS degree at my school. Having had many of the BA classes, and computer classes that center around the management side, I have found it very valuable.

    I plan on getting a master's in both BA and another IS field. While I do work for myself, they will prove invaluable should I ever decide that I want to pursue something else.

    Again, pay isn't as important as the knowledge. After all, you only get paid as much as you bring to the table. Having the understanding of how your work fits in with your company is important.
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  2. #27
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    There are old old dogs teaching you marketing in Colleges and they think printed advertising is still the greatest.

    Internet marketing is in, newspapers all over USA ARe going bankrupt.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Zealot Rexibit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullshitwebsites View Post
    There are old old dogs teaching you marketing in Colleges and they think printed advertising is still the greatest.

    Internet marketing is in, newspapers all over USA ARe going bankrupt.
    This has no relevance in determining if a Business Administration degree is worth pursuing.

    Yes, there are some teachers which may prefer old marketing strategies. However, they all have to be evaluated. They also must teach their curriculum. The curriculum changes based on the times.
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  4. #29
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    I don't think it would hurt but a lot of work experience is good for you; goes a long way.
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  5. #30
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    Getting a higher degree will definitely help you land a higher paying position. And, the pay rates vary greatly because some companies will pay you a bonus or commission on top of your base. Of course, this is assuming you work for someone else.

    Stating the obvious here...If you go into business for yourself, you decide how much you make.
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  6. #31
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    i think MBA is pretty good if you have the time and money ..

  7. #32
    SitePoint Wizard dethfire's Avatar
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    Whether an MBA is worth it or not depends solely on where you go. If you can get into Stanford, Northwestern, Harvard... hell you do it. Because the people you meet there and the connections you are given give a free pass to anything you want. I had a friend goto MBA at Harvard and he said when he was done he had dream jobs begging him to sign on. Now if you goto MBA school at some joe shmoe school, no it's not worth it. It's all about connections.
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  8. #33
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    There are many reasons to get a higher degree:

    1. Getting the paper. You need that diploma for career advancement as in many cases you simply will not be considered for a position unless you have a specific degree - people just won't take you seriously. How many execs have you seen without a master's degree?

    Many people say the degree isn't worth as much because there are so many MBAs jobless... well, guess what, your chances of of getting a job without an MBA are even lower. Why should anyone hire you when they have people with MBAs standing in the line.

    2. Connections. Go to a good university, make a lot of good friends, drink and party, and then start businesses together. It works out great.

    3. University is just great... I don't know about you, but I loved that time, its so much fun.

  9. #34
    SitePoint Wizard ShayneTilley's Avatar
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    I've done a lot of recruiting in current and previous roles, and, IMO, a qualification might get you an interview, but it won't get you a job.

    The biggest thing I take from looking a the resume of a person who has completed their MBA, degree, masters etc is that they've shown a strong commitment to seeing a long term project through, which yes can be demonstrated in other ways, but even if it's not specific to the role, it might just be the difference between you and someone else.

    But I'll in most cases look at work experience, demonstrated success in the practical application of the skills required for the role, attitude, character and cultural fit first.

    It's all about how successful you will be in a particular role for a company, not what a piece of paper says your supposed to know. And Edman even though most execs will have a certification, it's not always the case, and for those that do, a lot will get their quals long after their careers have started.

    But at the end of the day - even if they've got their Masters of the Universe it's what they really can do -- not what a piece of paper says .
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  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShayneTilley View Post
    I've done a lot of recruiting in current and previous roles, and, IMO, a qualification might get you an interview, but it won't get you a job.

    The biggest thing I take from looking a the resume of a person who has completed their MBA, degree, masters etc is that they've shown a strong commitment to seeing a long term project through, which yes can be demonstrated in other ways, but even if it's not specific to the role, it might just be the difference between you and someone else.

    But I'll in most cases look at work experience, demonstrated success in the practical application of the skills required for the role, attitude, character and cultural fit first.

    It's all about how successful you will be in a particular role for a company, not what a piece of paper says your supposed to know. And Edman even though most execs will have a certification, it's not always the case, and for those that do, a lot will get their quals long after their careers have started.

    But at the end of the day - even if they've got their Masters of the Universe it's what they really can do -- not what a piece of paper says .


    Excellent point.

  11. #36
    SitePoint Member JetPunk's Avatar
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    If you work for a big company, MBAs are more important, and help in getting a higher salary.

    There's no point in just getting an MBA, but if you've been working for a few years and see it as a stepping stool, then it could be a good idea.
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  12. #37
    SitePoint Wizard ShayneTilley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetPunk View Post
    If you work for a big company, MBAs are more important, and help in getting a higher salary.

    There's no point in just getting an MBA, but if you've been working for a few years and see it as a stepping stool, then it could be a good idea.
    Perhaps and that's very much been the motivating factor for most people I know who've chosen to go for it. Not what I'd do, and I haven't seen a heap of success from it, but worth considering.
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  13. #38
    SitePoint Enthusiast Kernelpower_Ltd's Avatar
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    I think you would be alot better off getting a whole range of google certificates then handle a companies web marketing strategy , someone with a business degree couldnt walk into a firm and start planning their web strategies.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShayneTilley View Post
    I've done a lot of recruiting in current and previous roles, and, IMO, a qualification might get you an interview, but it won't get you a job.
    But it does get you the interview

    I think that someone should do what they feel like it and seek knowledge. MBAs are better than most masters because they deal with situations that happen in all companies, even if they are more directed to people that will work with someone else.

    That doens't mean that you can't get the knowledge by yourself.

    As I said in other thread, having a degree is not necessary and University may not seem practical. Still, it gives you a solid base which will help you to gain real knowledge faster and trains your brain to work.

    In addition to that, having it will help you in your career, at least most of the time. It will help you to be promoted faster and it will get you interviews.

    The contacts that you make and the fun the you may have while doing it, it's just a plus.

    It simply increases your chances of success. Still, as Shayne said, it is up to you to get to the top.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShayneTilley View Post
    I've done a lot of recruiting in current and previous roles, and, IMO, a qualification might get you an interview, but it won't get you a job.
    Obviously... nobody is saying that MBA is some sort of a gold pass to a better job.

    But if a vacancy has 10 applications, out of which 7 have a master's degree and 3 do not, guess which CVs go in the bin first?

    But I'll in most cases look at work experience, demonstrated success in the practical application of the skills required for the role, attitude, character and cultural fit first.
    The problem is, you cannot get relevant work experience if you don't have relevant previous experience. Its a vicious cycle of "you cannot get a good job if you haven't got a previous good job".

    Obviously, depending on how good you are, you can make it out of this cycle with or without a degree. But a degree is just such a big foot in the door. It shows you are serious. It shows you are able to commit. It shows you believe in yourself well enough to take a financial risk. It shows you are not a moron. It strikes out lots of hard questions from the interviewer's list.

    In some areas, a degree actually IS a golden pass to a better job. Where I live, the area is heavily dominated by few universities, and even large companies have literally become dominated by what we call University X Mafia - a company's management becomes dominated by graduates from a single university.

    And this really makes sense, you go to an interview, and the interviewer asks "Where did you study?"
    "University X"
    "Oh, I went to university X as well. Who was your Maths teacher?"
    "Professor Dipstick"
    "I had him too! We used to glue chewing gum on his seat every lecture... those were the times"
    And BAM! its like you know each other even though you were never even in the same class or even year.

    Next guy comes in.
    "Where did you study?"
    "Oh, I didn't. I think its not a very good money investment and I would rather concentrate on getting work experience"
    "Riiiiight, I'm sure. So what sort of work experience DO you have?"
    "Walmart, Mcdonald's, pizza hut"
    "Do you have any relevant work experience?"
    "Nope, nobody wants to hire me because I have no previous work experience"
    "errr...."

    And Edman even though most execs will have a certification, it's not always the case, and for those that do, a lot will get their quals long after their careers have started.
    Not sure what you mean? Getting an MBA is not the next level of high school. Before you get an MBA, you should have successfully applied knowledge learned in a regular bachelor's program. An MBA then gives you additional knowledge and contacts that can take you to the next level, out of that damned cubicle.

    And the way your phrased it - "it's not always the case, and for those that do" - you make it sound as if few execs have certification, as if having a degree is the exception, and not the rule. In reality, not having a degree is the exception that can be afforded only by the smartest entrepreneurs. Unless you're the next Steve Jobs (hint: you're not) you cannot afford to miss opportunities simply because you didn't commit a year to study things you should find interesting anyway.

  16. #41
    SitePoint Zealot Dorsey's Avatar
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    An MBA is a large investment of both time and money, but it usually pays off. A few years ago, many people (mostly women, as it turns out) left the workforce to obtain an MBA only to find that the economy had tanked and while they had a new degree, they had lost their jobs and found it difficult to get another because so many were in the same position.

    Aside from learning the theory and science behind business and decision-making, I've been told that the largest benefit is in learning teamwork and group problem-solving skills. These study groups force both cooperation and opening up to all sorts of ideas. The pressure of deadlines further enforces the habit of not taking forever to produce your best work.

    So, it's just what you learn in a business program, especially an advanced one, but a way of thinking and problem-solving that can be an advantage for the rest of your life.

  17. #42
    SitePoint Zealot Mitochondrion's Avatar
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    If you desperately need a new degree get a health care degree such as nursing or physical therapy or something like that. It doesn't even have to be clinical (involving touching people). There are one million and one options. Get out of the mindset of the anonymous army of MBA's in black suits, many of whom will be losing their jobs in the next few months. There are just too freaking many of those people and the economy is growing fed up with them. The health care industry needs legions of clinical informatics people. With your web publishing experience and your health industry experience you will have access to just the right kind of people in both industries. You can turn that into a career in the IT dept. of a hospital or a university teaching position or start your own company catering to the health care industry. Because of the desperately large and desperately unhealthy population of this country, the health care industry will be growing long after many other industries have curled up into a fetal position and shrunk.

    I think by getting an MBA you are going from specific to general skills-because the MBA is such a vague degree-I can't imagine anything more vague. But I feel you need to be going from generalized to more specific. A lot of people talk about "finding your niche market" and they're right.

    I've just gotten a new nursing job at Chicago's Christ Hospital and gone through their orientation program. All the teaching modules are designed in Flash and Director and run on computer stations that the students play with. The module that teaches how to use a blood glucose monitor (a little gadget the size of a fat calculator) was all done in Flash. It's a simulation that involves students "operating the device" by clicking "buttons". And medical schools-oh boy, how much money can be made working with medical schools. They have an insatiable appetite for anatomical simulations and stuff like that-done in 3D software, Flash, etc.

    Trouble is if you have no health care background at all you lack 1) knowledge and also you lack 2) access to the right people...It's all about surrounding yourself with the right people.

  18. #43
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    Any degree is worth a risk, but i think it is important to make sure you will enjoy it as well as gain what you want out of pursuing it. I did a Creative Writing degree and truly enjoyed it, and feel it was worth the risk (despite what many people said).

  19. #44
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    A Bachelor's degree in Business Administration is generally the minimum requirement of most employers for entry-level positions in business. A Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) will prepare students for careers in financial services, economics, accounting, sales, human resources, and marketing. Statistics show that people with Bachelorís degrees benefit from higher salaries and higher-level job positions as compared to those without. Alternatively, a Master's degree in Business is more specialized. Several Masterís programs are also targeted towards people who have been working for a while and need the increased academic credentials to move on higher up the corporate ladder. There are several career options open to you even with a basic business degree. You could look at areas as diverse as sales and marketing, healthcare administration, travel management, finance and investments, human resource management, retail management, business consultancy, investment advisors, and venture capitalists. Whatever you finally choose, your education will form the foundation of your success. Check out the business degree programs offered by CollegeAmerica if you are interested - they come highly recommended.

  20. #45
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    Its good you can compete your MBA in marketing and advertising.Its a nice combination to go with.After completion you can get nice package in any company.

  21. #46
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    Three years of work experience gets you about 80k with a signing bonus.

    Depends what you do with it and who is your employer, i know some people who have become high school teachers after gaining their MBA.

  22. #47
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    I would say don't get an MBA if your goal is to learn a lot about business. it just costs too much for that. You would be better off getting something like Masters in Marketing or Management. However, if your goal is to boost your CV and make more money I believe it is a worthwhile investment of time and money.

  23. #48
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    It's becoming a trend whereby those aiming for higher managerial position will go for MBA courses while employer will also put higher emphasis towards promoting people with the qualification. It's definitely the best investment.


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