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Thread: MySQL usage

  1. #1
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    Formerly I've always used Access/ASP but I decided to try PHP/MySQL. No problems with the programming, its pretty easy. But I was under the impression that you could make as many databases as you wanted with MySQL. However my hosting company has limited me to 1. Is it standard practice to do this? Or are there hosting companies that do not limit the amount of MySQL databases you may use?

    Chris

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    SitePoint Wizard
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    Most hosts only allow one MySQL database however all offer unlimited tables. The same concept applies to Access DBs: the .mdb is the database, the table is the mySQL table. You can't have unlimited DSNs but you can have unlimited tables within the MDBs. For example in my mySQL database named 'aboutpcs' I have 4 tables, yet just one database.

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    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    Well the host I use for the sites I've done using asp/access limit the # of DSN connections you can have, it starts at 5, and in higher packages its higher obviously. But they dont limit dsn-less connections at all. I just thought that MySQL might be the same way, I guess not. Its disappointing.

    Chris

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    SitePoint Wizard TWTCommish's Avatar
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    I don't see why it would be dissapointing...every database needs a table to store info...so all you should need is one database with a few tables in it...each table can handle tons of records...I don't see a problem.



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    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    I currently work in Oracle and SQL Server. Our systems have multiple databases with hundreds of tables each in them. We have tables for Production, Development (each department has their own), Redundancy, Reporting and Archives.

    The production databases can get well over 1 million new records a day. For speed and efficiency reasons (try running a query on several million records), they only keep five days worth of data. After that the data is switched to the archives which keeps 12 months worth of data.

    Our reports are very intensive. One tracks the number of seconds from the time a customer's alarm goes off until the patrol car arrives on the scene, which is all stored in a database. Running the queries for the reports can take upwards of 5 minutes for a single day.

    Development is ongoing, Sales has a development database, Patrol (my department)currently has four, so on and so forth. This prevents us from blowing up the production server or locking up the network with an improperly wrote query. Case in point if someone typed "select * from tblShift" on the production server, they could go home and if they were lucky it would be finished the next morning with 100+ employees work schedules for the last year including login, logout, breaks, beat hits, incidents, alarms, calls and a lot of other information. If they were luckier they would still be employed when they showed up for work the next morning after locking up the hub, and bringing the entire company to a halt.

    Another case in point is that we currently track the GPS of all patrol vehicles on a minute by minute basis. We can retrace their routes during the shift and determine how long they stay at one address. We can even display this information on a map (which is a proprietary database format), double click on the car and get the address they are at. Currently we do this for 30 vehicles. The plans are to roll it out to 6000 vehicles nationwide.

    Of course this is not your typical Website but I can see where he is coming from. Oh and everything mentioned above will be on the company Intranet within the next year including the mobile terminals located in each vehicle.

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  6. #6
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
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    My issue was running more than one site off a domain name, and if they're database based sites then you'd want a different database for each.

    Another example this site I'm working on for this insurance company will have 2 databases, 1 user/password type database and 2 their content database. Maybe it would be possible to combine them but I don't know if that would be the best idea. However it's going to be on an NT server so I'll get as many databases as I want.

    Chris


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