It feels very, very, very wrong to list every possible HTML element and set a reset on it.

Since I deal with graphics of sites, I DO need A reset. Most of the time it's the easy one:
Code:
* {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
}

img, fieldset {
  border: 0;
}

ul, li {
  list-style: none;
}
Since I've begun using my fieldsets more, I don't have fieldset border set to none anymore. If the page has a lot of actually bulletted lists, instead of menus, I don't have the last delcaration either.

If there are a lot of forms (something other than username/password, or search) then I modify the padding. I hate doing it, but somewhere there's some magical problem with padding and forms-- I've never heard explicitly what the problem actually is, just "something to do with accessibility" that I can't find with JAWS, so in this case, one the site with the 100 forms:

Code:
* {
  margin: 0;
}
html, body, div, span, a, p, any other elements used ON THAT PAGE/SITE only, form, fieldset, legend, label {
  padding: 0;
}
Meaning it's different per page, since I will not list elements who are not in use in my reset. I still remove padding etc from form elements, just not the inputs, which is apparently where the problem is. Since the inputs are inline, I'm 99% sure that the "accessibility" problem has nothing to do with margins, but only padding. So I can still zero my margins.

I like the control of setting margins and padding where I need them, and know that wherever I say nothing, the amount there is ZERO. This is so incredibly useful, especially when stlying lists-- you just can't beat that "IE uses margin and FF uses padding" (or is it the other way around?) with CSS. You need to start at zero, or lose your bullets or images or whatever--choose which browser will look like garbage. That's not a choice I will make.

I know some people would think it's a good idea to have a slightly bloated CSS reset sitting somewhere, and letting every page reference to it. But it seems much easier to me to just taylor the code to the page-- I'd rather have each page or site optimised rather than use bloat to make things flexible or easier for the developer. Why make the client download all that garbage if it's not needed?

My two eurocents : )