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  1. #26
    SitePoint Member simonfj's Avatar
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    If I want to be involved in interactive media

    Quote Originally Posted by samsoner View Post
    Which educational foundation is the best to have?

    Visual communication skills or writing skills in the web design/motion graphics/online media industries?

    Should one have a degree in Journalism (with an emphasis in print/online medium) or Graphic Design?

    Thanks and thanks for the replies.
    I'm really not sure what "educational foundation" might be best for the new interactive media industries these days. Most are so embryonic. The best advice I can give is the same as XLCowboy's. Follow your instinct, be clear on what you see as the way things will develop, and suck every brain which sounds sensible.

    You might try these guys. My old alma mater. If you can get them to start a few forums, you might find they end up giving you a job.

  2. #27
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    I'm not sure if it's just me who thinks this way but there are quite a big "hole" in terms of looking someone who understands "programming" (java/c#/php) and design (javascript/html/css). By knowing both, you can go beyond the beyond.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by JNKlein View Post
    Most of the technical people I work with are not "just coders". The programmers I know have plenty of design experience, the designers have plenty of motion graphics experience, and the UX experts have plenty of programming experience.

    There is a middle class income in all of the things you mentioned, except you'd probably rephrase "forum moderator" to "community manager", and it would expand far beyond a forum, and "youtube video uploader" to "video editor", and would need experience in the appropriate software.

    It's not about what you do, it's about how good you are at it. So pick what you like, and own it.
    It's almost religious....Amen.


    You could also get into SEO and Web Marketing.
    If you get good at that, there is alot of money to be made.

  4. #29
    SitePoint Zealot Mitochondrion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by XLCowBoy View Post
    Anything will pay the bills as long as you're good at it.

    What "career" you choose doesn't matter if you suck at it anyway.

    So to answer your question:
    Find something you're good at, passionate about, then stick with it.
    Correct, with the following exception. A green nurse, inexperienced doctor, or police officer, or green union carpenter will know jack straight out of school. They will get a mentor and slowly but steadily get his/her skills up-to-date until she becomes fully proficient and can be cut loose. In interactive/new media you're either unemployed and living with your mom (she pays your bills) or you're fully proficient. There's not much of a gray area in between like you see it in other professions.
    Last edited by Mitochondrion; May 21, 2008 at 17:36.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by XLCowBoy View Post
    Anything will pay the bills as long as you're good at it.

    What "career" you choose doesn't matter if you suck at it anyway.

    So to answer your question:
    Find something you're good at, passionate about, then stick with it.
    /agree

  6. #31
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    the most important thing is you have passion about it. dont think about the money it can brings to you.it wont last..

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitochondrion View Post
    Correct, with the following exception. A green nurse, inexperienced doctor, or police officer, or green union carpenter will know jack straight out of school. They will get a mentor and slowly but steadily get his/her skills up-to-date until she becomes fully proficient and can be cut loose. In interactive/new media you're either unemployed and living with your mom (she pays your bills) or you're fully proficient. There's not much of a gray area in between like you see it in other professions.
    *scratches chin*

    Somehow, that's not quite right.

    Arts-wise, yes, I have to agree. You're either good (and have a job), or you suck (and you teeter between living with your mom or unemployment).

    Programming, not exactly. You can find work as a junior in a dev company, and you should receive the same tutelage as a green nurse as you say.

    Depends on the "job" in question, IMHO.

  8. #33
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    Question

    And finally...

    How IMPORTANT is writing skills? Journalism-related skills? It looks like I may need to back off on Graphic Design 100% and focus on something that I believe in my mind is more...


    applicable??

    And I agree with you guys previous posts on being a simple front-end web developer..it's not enough.

    Thanks

  9. #34
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy
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    There are hundreds of different careers in this field... below is a small list.

    • UI Designer
    • Graphic Designer/Web Designer
    • User Interface Consultant
    • Usability Expert/Consultant
    • SEO Consultant
    • Online marketing consultant
    • Programmer/Developer
    • Project manager
    • Team leader
    • Director of [insert department here]
    • Sales
    • Online marketing consultant
    • E-commerce consultant
    • Multimedia/Flash designer
    • Illustrator
    • Database administrator
    • Server administrator
    • Tech support
    • many more

    Think of a company like Google or Yahoo! that has thousands of employees. What types of job positions are there at Google?

    Most people are too closed minded when it comes to web development I think. They think they have to be a one-man-show or that they have to generalize. You can specialize and make a great living.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Enthusiast Licensed Rocky's Avatar
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    What do you do right now? There are many specialties. its upto your skills. choose which fits to your skills.
    New FREE Internet Marketing
    resource at http://www.TrueInternetMarketingWarriors.com

  11. #36
    SitePoint Zealot Mitochondrion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beley View Post
    There are hundreds of different careers in this field... below is a small list.

    • UI Designer
    • Graphic Designer/Web Designer
    • User Interface Consultant
    • Usability Expert/Consultant
    • SEO Consultant
    • Online marketing consultant
    • Programmer/Developer
    • Project manager
    • Team leader
    • Director of [insert department here]
    • Sales
    • Online marketing consultant
    • E-commerce consultant
    • Multimedia/Flash designer
    • Illustrator
    • Database administrator
    • Server administrator
    • Tech support
    • many more

    Think of a company like Google or Yahoo! that has thousands of employees. What types of job positions are there at Google?

    Most people are too closed minded when it comes to web development I think. They think they have to be a one-man-show or that they have to generalize. You can specialize and make a great living.
    I know some of the best guys in the business in Chicago. They have no prospect of getting hired by Yahoo! or Google. They're struggling to stay afloat. Some of the award winners are taking part-time teaching positions without benefits-just to survive. A part time job won't pay all the bills but at least it will have some income predictability. Let me meet just one successful guy who is pursuing one of those specialties and I will believe you.

  12. #37
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitochondrion View Post
    I know some of the best guys in the business in Chicago. They have no prospect of getting hired by Yahoo! or Google. They're struggling to stay afloat. Some of the award winners are taking part-time teaching positions without benefits-just to survive. A part time job won't pay all the bills but at least it will have some income predictability. Let me meet just one successful guy who is pursuing one of those specialties and I will believe you.
    Don't take this the wrong way, but being an "award winning" web designer doesn't mean much. Awards don't pay the bills. Clients who pay you money pay the bills.

    Your friends may be really good at designing, but lousy at business. Its the same with every industry - really talented people go into business doing what they do best, only to find out they can't hack it and go out of business. They get disillusioned about the "industry" and blame their circumstances on things like a poor economy or cheap clients.

    In reality, it's likely poor business decisions. In the vast majority of situations, clients don't just flock to you. You have to constantly meet people, cultivate relationships, earn referrals. You have to get out there and beat down doors sometimes. There are also good times and bad, and you might need to work a little harder in the bad times to stay afloat. That's life.

    But in every industry, one thing I've noticed is it's not the most talented people who are successful. It's the people who do what it takes. Good businessmen are successful... talent has something to do with it, sure. But you have to be a good business person. If you're the best web designer or programmer in the world, keeping shotty books, or not actively cultivating relationships with potential clients is going to put you out of business.

  13. #38
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy
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    And my above post may seem skewed to client work, but it applies equally well to those trying to get a job at a larger firm. Yahoo and Google are not the only two companies out there. There are hundreds, maybe thousands of companies that hire specialists every day.

    I personally know programmers, project managers, systems analysts that are gainfully employed and doing well.

  14. #39
    SitePoint Zealot Ken Sharpe's Avatar
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    Brandon is correct, jobs abound for the creative job seeker who is willing to do some work and some research to make it happen!

  15. #40
    SitePoint Zealot Mitochondrion's Avatar
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    I never had good role models in the industry which is a reason I decided against staying in it full-time. I don't see it as a full-time career anymore. Role models are important if you're new to the field. In 2001, two years after graduating from the interactive multimedia program I was invited as a speaker at our college. The goal was to talk about our success in the industry-for the benefit of the seniors. One of most experienced senior designers who had attended the same design program, a guy who had been in multimedia since 1995 or so, gave a speech about how he was forced to downgrade his career and financial expectations because of the stinky climate in the industry and the layoffs. He had just lost a full time design job. That guy disappointed me a great deal. I used to think he was outstanding. He was an older guy; 40-something while we were 20-something, he was very self-confident or at least used to be before his pathetic speech.


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