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  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard mPeror's Avatar
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    Question Using your employer's projects in your online portfolio

    1) Do you need to ask your employer for permission to include the projects you've done for him in your online portfolio as something you've worked on?

    (I know laws differ from one country to another, but I'm asking about the norm.)

    2) How would you prove later on that you've worked on these projects? you most likely won't have any control over the project after its delivered, and the client would only know your company's name, not yours.


    Thanks in advance !

  2. #2
    I hate Spammers mobyme's Avatar
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    There is nothing to stop you telling the world that you used to work for a company or which projects you worked on unless you have signed something to the contrary. However, if you do this make sure that everything you say is 100% truthful and do not embellish your role; otherwise you could finish up with problems.You are not allowed to reproduce anything that you did while working for your employer and put it in your portfolio as it is their property, as are screenshots. Why don't you clear it with your employer and save yourself any hassle? As to whether or not you can prove you worked on something is probably proven by the fact that you say you did; and your employer or former employer has not seen fit to contradict you or ask you to remove any statements saying you did from your site. Of course there is nothing to stop any prospective clients checking out the truthfulness of your statements with the company in question.
    There are three kinds of men:
    The ones that learn by reading.
    The few who learn by observation.
    The rest of us have to pee on the electric fence.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Wizard mPeror's Avatar
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    Thanks mobyme.

    Quote Originally Posted by mobyme
    Why don't you clear it with your employer and save yourself any hassle?
    because, in case it doesn't need permission, they would probably use my request to negotiate something that benefits them in return.

  4. #4
    Is Still Alive silver trophybronze trophy RetroNetro's Avatar
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    This comes up alot for me (freelancing, not as an actual employee of a company) I do alot of work for other design businesses and or I just do part of the whole creation for a client. (slice/code or wordpress theme, etc...) Just not the whole site.

    I usually just ask the client if I am allowed to include it as part of my portfolio, most say sure and are surprised I even asked, though a few do not want anyone to know anyone had anything to do with it but them, they usually state this upfront.

    Alot of times after the final touches have been added (by someone else) I no longer want anyone to associate my name with it anyway.

  5. #5
    SitePoint Addict chestertondevelopment's Avatar
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    It may seem petty but this is something I include up front in the contract, especially when working with companies which are just outsourcing one part to me e.g. development.

    I just include a clause saying I have permission to use this work in any promotional material, including but not limited to the use on website xx. blah blah.... This way I can always come back to the contract if anyone raises any queries.

    Also, I tend to be weary of any projects which do not allow me to feature work in my portfolio. It tends to be firms that act as middlemen to clients but don't tell the clients they are outsourcing the work. If I do accept said work, I will usually charge slightly more as I don't benefit from extra work in my portfolio and although it gets money in, it doesn't necessarily provide any long-term benefit.


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