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  1. #1
    FBI secret agent digitman's Avatar
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    How many files can be uploaded from a form? (Maximum)

    Hi,

    I'm building a mass upload form for a photo gallery. The client wants to upload between 20-100 files each time with a single form submission. I'm wondering if its possible, or if there are any limitations about this that I should know about. Can someone please tell me?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    . shoooo... silver trophy logic_earth's Avatar
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    I would stop at 5 max for HTTP uploading.

    Instead I would build a client application the uses FTP to upload 10 images at once then notify the web application using web services.
    Logic without the fatal effects.
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    SitePoint Enthusiast bdude's Avatar
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    That depends on the upload_max_filesize in php.ini
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  4. #4
    FBI secret agent digitman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by logic_earth View Post
    I would stop at 5 max for HTTP uploading.

    Instead I would build a client application the uses FTP to upload 10 images at once then notify the web application using web services.
    I can't do that because I don't know any client-side coding languages. Is there any particular disadvantage of uploading all of them through HTTP that makes you say so?

  5. #5
    . shoooo... silver trophy logic_earth's Avatar
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    HTTP wasn't designed to handle file uploads. Just because we can doesn't make it the best way to do it. Its very error pron.
    Logic without the fatal effects.
    All code snippets are licensed under WTFPL.


  6. #6
    FBI secret agent digitman's Avatar
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    Is this your theory or have you done any actual testing to back this up?

  7. #7
    Theoretical Physics Student bronze trophy Jake Arkinstall's Avatar
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    It's proven, and has reasons.

    HTTP is NOT for uploading files. It can handle 1 or 2 efficiently, after which it gets slow and pointless.

    FTP was made for file uploads - it handles hundreds of files efficiently (as we see when uploading whole sites to FTP servers).
    Jake Arkinstall
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  8. #8
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    The reason why the file size limit is set to 2Mb is that by the time you get files that big using HTTP to upload them becomes extremely inefficient.

    You really should use a screwdriver when you want to put in screws rather than bashing them with a brick and you really should use FTP (or another protocol designed for file transfers) to upload files rather than bashin then through with HTTP. In both cases the bashing may get the job done but using the proper tool gets thhe job done better.
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  9. #9
    SitePoint Addict telos's Avatar
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  10. #10
    . shoooo... silver trophy logic_earth's Avatar
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    That is still using HTTP.
    Logic without the fatal effects.
    All code snippets are licensed under WTFPL.


  11. #11
    SitePoint Wizard Hammer65's Avatar
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    If all you know is PHP look into doing a compiled PHP/GTK app using Roadsend and leverage the FTP support in PHP to do this, or try Adobe Air and use it's socket capabilities. I don't think there are currently any AS3 based FTP libraries available, but you might find a way to do it. The retailers that I have seen do online photo processing for instance, all have desktop based client apps that do this. As mentioned, using HTTP for this is just not practical.
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  12. #12
    SitePoint Addict telos's Avatar
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    Even thought the Flex uses HTTP, it works by uploading them in order, a few at a time, not all at the same time. It works very well.

    I've used it to upload 20+ MP3's at one time.


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