SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Google Zombie ssandecki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    665
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Can you copyright a paper airplane design?

    I'm thinking of start a paper airplane section on my crafts website. The issue is I'm not areodynamic engineer and would use models made by someone at some point in time (recently or in the past). Can you legally put designs of paper airplanes on your website without violating any copyright laws?

    I would be making the actual graphics and\or video tutorials myself and have my own unique web design with my own instructions in my own words. Any Ideas?

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy C. Ankerstjerne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    The Kingdom of Denmark
    Posts
    2,702
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Paper aircrafts would fall under either patents or (if it's a unique design used as a logo) trademarks. I doubt anyone would go through the trouble of patenting a paper aircraft design, but you would of course have to check to make sure.
    Christian Ankerstjerne
    <p<strong<abbr/HTML/ 4 teh win</>
    <>In Soviet Russia, website codes you!

  3. #3
    SitePoint Zealot stikkybubble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Pluto
    Posts
    182
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If there are recognisably unique aeroplane designs, this might be worth worrying about. I'd query where you are getting the instructions from. If you are going to use someone else's instructions, even if re-worded, it is probably best to OK it with them first. With any luck, people who design paper aeroplanes won't be too stuffy about it! If you just work from a photo and create the instructions yourself from scratch, I expect it would be reasonable to say that this was a separate work.

    I don't have any first-hand experience of this, but remember a Book Illustration class where we were told the sobering tale of a knitted toy animal, bought from a jumble sale, that was used as a model for some illustrations. The lady who knitted it recognised it and sued for &#163;5000. Apparently the publishers will no longer accept illustrations that use props like this, unless they have been purpose-made, to avoid this possibility.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •