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  1. #1
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    Who should meet the client?

    I am just starting up an webdesign company, so I wondered who should meet the client if they want us to visit them? Is it the designer/programmer him self and if it is his job to do so, how will that effect the work?

    I was thinking about all the time that will be spend meeting clients.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy bluedreamer's Avatar
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    In a sense it could be anyone from your organisation but whoever it is should be smart enough to know what they're talking about and be able to understand the clients needs. Additionally you don't want someone who promises things that can't be done!

  3. #3
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    I think that whoever your sales person is would be your best bet. The first meeting with the client should be the information gathering one. Once you have a list of the needs of the client, then you talk to your designer/programmer and discuss what you can and what you cannot do.

    There should be no quotes or "yes we can" at the initial meeting. Just an assessment of the situation.

  4. #4
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    Never send a developer to a sales meeting; you need to send someone primarily skilled in sales techniques - just make sure they have a good understanding of what they are selling. They don't need to be a developer, but they do need to know what services you can offer - a good sales man will know his business inside-out. You would probably be better off holding off on an actual face-to-face until you've had some preliminary sales talks over the phone or via email. This way you can disqualify suspect prospects and also bring up any technical issues which you can pass on to your technical guys for their opinion.

  5. #5
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    In a small firm it's generally going to be your CEO, Sales or Biz Dev person. In larger firms you'll tend to have technical sales people (often called sales engineers) who assist in selling organizations and mainly IT departments on your services.

    As your project continues it's a great idea to loop your developer & designer in with the client if they are a people-friendly individuals and if your project is large enough to warrant allocating time this way.
    - Ted S

  6. #6
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    Well the problem is that the designers are not a vey outgoing persons and neither am I, I think it would be smart to hire someone that is responsible for the sales...but I dont think we have so much meetings, what could he be doing in the spare time?

  7. #7
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    You could hire them on an as needed basis. But I would not recommend that. I'd recommend that you, someone who knows the business, to meet and discuss how your company can help solve the client's problem.

    This gives you practice for your interpersonal communication skills.

  8. #8
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    Well that would be me, but I really dont have a personality of salesman...I really suck

  9. #9
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    Just start with some small clients, do your research and see how it goes. You'll do better then you'll expect

  10. #10
    SitePoint Addict jessebhunt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonee View Post
    Well the problem is that the designers are not a vey outgoing persons and neither am I, I think it would be smart to hire someone that is responsible for the sales...but I dont think we have so much meetings, what could he be doing in the spare time?
    If you've got the budget to hire a salesperson, there is plenty that they can do when they're not in meetings. For example, they could call on new prospects, visit local businesses to introduce the company, attend networking events, perform marketing tasks, etc.

    If you don't have the budget to hire a salesperson, you may have to suck it up and do the sales meetings yourself until you can afford to pay someone to do it for you.
    Now Hiring
    Looking for (x)html coder/ php programmer/
    WordPress expert for project work. PM me with
    your rates and work samples if you're interested.

  11. #11
    SitePoint Evangelist Unit7285's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonee View Post
    I really dont have a personality of salesman...I really suck
    Then buy Selling To Win, by Richard Denny. It's on Amazon.

    Just follow his procedures to the letter and you'll bring in the business. It's a very practical book. He breaks down the stages of a sales meeting into small chunks and explains each step.

    I bought it in 1988, and the latest edition is 2006, so he must be doing something right.


    Paul

  12. #12
    SitePoint Member personinneed's Avatar
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    There are good tips in this thread, so I'm just going to echo what the others said. If you don't have a salesperson personality and can't hire a sales pro, go yourself: at least it'll tell them that you're serious about wanting their business. I've found that many clients are relatively forgiving of a lacking "personality" as long as the pitch has strong merit and is easy to understand. If you're faithful and confident about the quality of your work and what you can do for your client, it'll show up, even if you're otherwise untrained.


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