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  1. #76
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    There are a lot of tips given in by all the people concerned with your dilemma. But if I may say, having the confidence to talk with the people you need to question are the most essential factor of every interview. Just believe in yourself and everything else will follow.

  2. #77
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    You may find this useful it details tips to conduct an effective interview:
    http://www.feedforall.com/how-to-con...-interview.htm

    HTH

  3. #78
    SitePoint Evangelist old_expat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MayaLocke View Post
    You may find this useful it details tips to conduct an effective interview:
    http://www.feedforall.com/how-to-con...-interview.htm

    HTH
    That's an interesting idea that I will read a lot more about. I like the idea that it's audio and can be edited, but I suppose it requires a good deal more skill and practice than an email interview.

    Just going over it in my feeble brain sets off all sorts of bells, whistles and what if's.

    I just wonder if asking an interview subject to install software for the interview is a non-starter.

    Be sure to inform guests of any required hardware or software that they must install prior to the interview.

  4. #79
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    Although you should have a framework for the interview with questions - make sure you listen to the interviewee and rather tham just fire your list of questions dig a little deeper into the answers. Think on your feet and try to make the interview flow, they will open up more and give you better answers.

  5. #80
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    I think that it related about the talent, you should choose the best profession for yourself.

  6. #81
    SitePoint Enthusiast queen4's Avatar
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    I think it takes some talent to lead the interviewee to say what u want to know.

    Not every interviewee is so cooperative I guess.

  7. #82
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    you know there are two ways of talking to people.one works when you have an extremely charming personality.but in cases of interview your research helps.research about the person to interview.and ofcourse your own talent to to make a conversation lively

  8. #83
    Web development Company chrisranjana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keddy1 View Post
    but in cases of interview your research helps.research about the person to interview
    And how you do you do your research on the person to interview ? Any ideas ? Any steps ?
    Chris, Programmer/Developer,
    Laravel Php Developers,
    Ruby on Rails programmers,
    http://www.chrisranjana.com

  9. #84
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    hey man thanks for this one.. This is a good writeup and is very helpful to me

    Quote Originally Posted by chris_fuel View Post
    Well, the specifics on the interview process will depend on what type of job you're dealing with. However, there are a few things to keep in mind:

    1) Does this person know anything about the company?

    Did you give them a web page or something to look at to describe your company? If so, figure out how much they've learned. Not much of a response? Might be a flag of a "safety interview" in case another job offer goes sour.

    2) Do you feel like punching them in the face?

    Humor aside, a somewhat overly tight person with little regards to humor might create a somewhat agitated work environment. Do they smile at all during the interview? Laugh at jokes? If you've got someone on your time that's kind of agitated all the time, other workers could potentially be spending more time thinking about how much they hate him than the next project's requirements.

    3) Working independently

    Yes, it's going to be most likely a team environment. However, strong independent thinking is also a plus. Someone who constantly has to tap into the knowledge of others loses time for the project, as well as the other person's time. If it's something that needs a lot of constant attention, well you've got meetings to get as much as possible out of the way.

    4) Don't take quitting/2 weeks or fired as an instant throwaway flag

    Someone quitting gives an obvious sense of lack of motivation for a job, but first figure out why it occurred. It may be something completely out of their control. If you throw someone perfectly suited for the job out based on this, you could have lost a key player to your team.

    5) Do research yourself on the position

    Look around at what people are expecting known for the job position. Even look around like you were applying for it yourself. In tech areas, look for standards that they should adhere to and see if they know said standards.

    6) Look for buzzwords

    As part of 5, figure out what the common acronyms and buzzwords are and how they relate to the position. If someone pulls like HTML, CSS, XML, SOAP, REST, etc. make sure they can actually expand them out and aren't just putting them up for kicks and giggles. Same goes with management or any other type of position.

    If you want to throw out what type of position it is, I can look and see if there's anything else I can add.

  10. #85
    SitePoint Enthusiast Moofball's Avatar
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    wow, really helpful stuff guys. Thanks

  11. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by amnion View Post

    1) Do your homework (already mentioned)
    2) Gather a list of great questions that elicit good responses from the person (also already mentioned)
    3) Prep the person before hand by letting them know what questions you'll be asking. This allows the person to get ready and be able to phrase answers to be more elegant and entertaining also.
    4) Find out if there's anything they want to talk about. Maybe they're just dying to be asked a magic question and no one ever asks.
    5) Be dynamic. Don't just go from question to question. Allow a conversation to unfold and insert questions in relevant places. Even if the conversation starts out boring or has some dulls spots, you can always edit the interview later.
    6) Thank them for their time and find out if they want you to include any final stuff in there (links, etc)
    i find this answer best among all
    i thi k nothing left to explain more, it covers all essential points you need to keep in mind

    good luck for the next interview

  12. #87
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    I think practices help. Get somebody who has experience interviewing people to guide you on it. I had an uncle who is really good at that and he told me that the main thing is keep your composure and relax. There is nothing to be afraid of.

  13. #88
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    Good points posted by amnion.
    Let me add more.
    Try to find out the person's own interests, this way you can be able to judge their abilities more comprehensively. You can do this by giving them free hand to express their selves in their own words. It will satisfy the interviewee's all expectations.
    The main purpose of interview is always to find out the best employees by making good judgment among all.

  14. #89
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by aaronsnider View Post
    Fear of the unknown can cost you alot of money, but the unknown can be
    something to embrace as well Shy.

    When you start your research on your topic you will learn the keywords your
    prospective clients are asking the search engines, start there. When you are
    doing your interview make sure your subject understands you aren't a
    seasoned interviewer and you don't want to miss anything important, let
    them know its ok to volunteer anything they think needs to be shared on the
    topic you are discussing.

    When your subject understands that you are not alltogether comfortable with
    what you are doing, it is very disarming to the subject and they will want to
    help make sure that you have covered all your basis.

    As far as asking an expert for an interview, understand that your perception
    is your reality. Just because you view someone as an expert doesn't mean
    that they will bash you for asking for an interview. It's more likely that
    that person will be flattered and more than willing to let you interview them
    (after all, people love talking about themselves or what they are passionate
    about)

    Nothing ventured nothing gained, trust me the first one you do will be so
    much fun and profitable it wont be long before you are searching for others
    to interview on any number of subjects.

    That's what I would do.
    Aaron
    I agree, when I first started, I was scared to jump in and ask question for fear of looking or sounding stupid. I now follow my bosses philosophy, "You can't do it wrong, You can only do it better".

  15. #90
    Non-Member Duleee's Avatar
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    Nice post's, didn't read all but i think for good interview need a lot of practice...

  16. #91
    SitePoint Enthusiast kirsky's Avatar
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    IMO try to bridge the gap between you and the interview. Make him feel at ease and very comfortable. Next is to ask the questions you prepared for the interviewer.

  17. #92
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    Lots of great posts here. I'm looking to do a couple of interviews soon and there's been some invaluable tips that I'll have to keep in mind.

    Certainly, confidence without arrogance goes a long way. I think also that really making the interviewee feel like you're talking with them rather than interrogating them will get you a much better result in the end. Lead them towards the questions you want answered without being aggressive about it, be attentive to what they're saying and most of all have fun with it.
    Follow first steps of my journey to online wealth on my blog.

  18. #93
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    Hi All,
    We've all heard stories of job candidates who looked great on paper but who were absolute disasters in person. With fewer and fewer interview opportunities available in this competitive market, it's essential to make the best possible first impression. You can learn from the mistakes of others and avoid the top 10 worst interview blunders.
    Poor handshake
    Talking too much
    Talking negatively about current or past employers/managers
    Showing up late or too early
    Treating the receptionist rudely
    Asking about benefits, vacation time or salary
    Not preparing for the interview
    Verbal ticks
    Not enough/too much eye contact
    Failure to match communication styles
    v

  19. #94
    SitePoint Member johns143's Avatar
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    Everyone really gives their best about the interviews. It helps me a lot to clarify a lot of doubts about the interview in a finest manner. I am very glad to see that kind of replies from others. This is very useful for me to get something better.

  20. #95
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    A good interviewer must have the following in mind:

    Your first objective should be to establish control of your interview. The following type of introduction may prove effective:

    "My purpose here today is to find out about you. If I determine there is potentially a good fit and you're the type of person I feel I could work with I'll invite you back for a second interview. We certainly don't make hiring decisions based on just one interview. What I'm going to do is ask you a series of qualifying questions."

    This sets the tone for the interview and it lets the candidate know that you are a serious company who takes personnel decisions very seriously. If at any point during the interview the candidate tries to take back your control by asking their own questions, the following statement may help you:

    "I can understand you want to know more about the position, however my purpose here today is..."

    Repeat the control statement ending with this addition:

    "Let's first try to get through these qualifying questions."

  21. #96
    SitePoint Enthusiast nixwebo's Avatar
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    I don't know what type of work environment will be required, but I would imagine connecting with the guy/gal on a personal level will be pretty important if you are going to be working with them on a one on one level.

  22. #97
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    Good relevant questions.

  23. #98
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    One of my pet peeves when interviewing candidates is sometimes the candidates lack of keeping up what's going on in the industry. If someone is really passionate about what they do, wouldn't they keep up with industry news? I think so. This is one of the ways we distinguish the good candidates from the bad.

    Some candidates say they read, but can't remember the website name or magazine, which I can understand and why I wrote this article on how RSS can diminish brand recognition. However, at the very least they should still know what going on.

  24. #99
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    your problem is you are taking interview as a problem, take it easy. Once you start taking lightly everything will be sort out.

  25. #100
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    Be confident and you can hit any interview job interview or article interviw


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