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  1. #1
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    Arrow some best traffic methods other than search engine submission

    Is there any best traffic methods other than search engine submission

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard esds's Avatar
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    Social networking & bookmarking site may help you somewhat in traffic.

  3. #3
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    join related topic forum discussions can be a way to build traffic for your website.
    Over 100 Free Wordpress Themes for download
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    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

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    Non-Member white.wizard's Avatar
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    Some good results you can get with:

    1. publish quality articles on different sites

    2. publish short video content about your website

    3. join some related blogs

    4. link exchange

  6. #6
    SitePoint Wizard
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    Write a blog about site and submit rss feed and add signature to any placs it is allowed.

  7. #7
    SitePoint Zealot theawristocrat's Avatar
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    Dont forget stumbleupon and craiglist and YOUTUBE
    Create a viral video.

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    He's No Good To Me Dead silver trophybronze trophy stymiee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by white.wizard View Post
    1. publish quality articles on different sites
    Quality content should always be on your own site if you can help it. The SEO benefits of this are tremendous.

  9. #9
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    Assuming you have good content, stumbleupon and digg will help a lot. Also press releases are good.

  10. #10
    SitePoint Addict Hafsoh's Avatar
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    * Give away free ebooks and white papers that contain links to your site.
    * Submit your free ebooks to ebook directories.
    * Create down loadable software which contains links to your site.

  11. #11
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    publish quality articles on different sites
    Definitely!

    Imagine for one moment, as an example: You have your articles in, say, 10 sites. From each site you have at least 10,000 readers in a month's time.

    Do the math.

    As for search engines, if, IF you are lucky to even be able to land on page one, far fewer will click on your link.

    Whatever you decide, good luck with it.

  12. #12
    He's No Good To Me Dead silver trophybronze trophy stymiee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    Imagine for one moment, as an example: You have your articles in, say, 10 sites. From each site you have at least 10,000 readers in a month's time.

    Do the math.
    That's a very generous and overly optimistic assumption. Take off a bunch of those zeros and round down and suddenly it's a lot more realistic.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    As for search engines, if, IF you are lucky to even be able to land on page one, far fewer will click on your link.
    On the flip side, that's a very pessimistic point of view. Being number one or on the first page isn't luck. It's just hard work. But that's true with lots of rewarding things in life.

  13. #13
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    That's a very generous and overly optimistic assumption. Take off a bunch of those zeros and round down and suddenly it's a lot more realistic.
    I knew I should have put "example" in bold.

    I'm sure he gets it just fine, and can see the numbers and possibilities for himself. Just like others like him have done before him, and are doing right now.


    On the flip side, that's a very pessimistic point of view. Being number one or on the first page isn't luck. It's just hard work. But that's true with lots of rewarding things in life.
    lol Make up your mind.

    And, yup, it's luck.

  14. #14
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    Definitely!

    Imagine for one moment, as an example: You have your articles in, say, 10 sites. From each site you have at least 10,000 readers in a month's time.

    Do the math.

    As for search engines, if, IF you are lucky to even be able to land on page one, far fewer will click on your link.

    Whatever you decide, good luck with it.
    What makes you think that 10,000 readers will find your articles buried underneath hundreds of other articles on the larger article sites? And then of course the users will have to find the article site in the search engines to even give your articles a chance of being read.

    Besides which, those who read articles on article sites are usually only there to find free content for their own sites. They have no intention of clicking on your link to access your site.

    If you want traffic, optimize your site so that users can find it in the search engines. Get some quality links that won't just improve your page rank but will also show up on linking sites and drive relevant traffic your way.

    Become an active and helpful members in forums that are related to your topic.

    Join social bookmarking sites and become active there.

    If you have something newsworthy on your site and a small advertising budget, try a press release.

    Post relevant and interesting comments on blogs your read.

    There are lots of ways to promote a site without writing and giving away free content. Keep your best work for publication on your site... and if it isn't your best work, why would you post it on another site where competition in your topic is at a premium?
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  15. #15
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    We had this same go around in that other thread last month. We have to do it again?


    What makes you think that 10,000 readers will find your articles buried underneath hundreds of other articles on the larger article sites?
    Because many Websites give writers their own space, and the subjects are broken up in categories, like Askmen, iVillage, About and other such content sites do.

    And there are A LOT of Webmasters who have their own little sites out there that do the same thing. Add them all up, and they, well, add up!

    I'm not talking about article directories, where ten billion articles are dumped into one hole.

    But even with directories, many still do make money from their submitted articles via affiliate links in the articles.


    And then of course the users will have to find the article site in the search engines to even give your articles a chance of being read.
    Wait a minute...you mean search engines are the only way to know about Websites?


    Besides which, those who read articles on article sites are usually only there to find free content for their own sites. They have no intention of clicking on your link to access your site.
    You know this, because???

    Some, SOME do. But they are going to get free stuff regardless.

    And all of the users have no intention of clicking on the link? Tell that to the God knows how many writers who know what they are doing, and they partly make a living from it. They sell their e-books partly through article marketing. Many do affiliate marketing via articles....

    I don't know where you got that one from.


    If you want traffic, optimize your site so that users can find it in the search engines. Get some quality links that won't just improve your page rank but will also show up on linking sites and drive relevant traffic your way.
    Agreed, but one shouldn't focus on it, put all of his energy towards it, because even if he is lucky to land on page one, practically all of the visitors from that source don't buy. They are window shoppers, tire kickers, and they are looking for free stuff, advice.

    Good ads and articles can weed a lot of them out. Try doing that with an overrated search enigine.


    Become an active and helpful members in forums that are related to your topic.
    Any method where one is working more hours and getting paid less than a minimum-paid worker is not much of a method. But...if he is going to be posting anway, he might as well put in his signature anyway.


    And, yes, there are a lot of great ways to promote a site. I know a lot of great ways. Not including the same ol' stuff that is repeated over and over and over and over again. Which most of it is overrated and doesn't work to begin with.

    Keep my articles on my site? No thanks. I'd rather have it read by thousands upon thousands of more potential customers through dozens of good content sites, than JUST the ones going to my site; ONE site.

    The best way to get visitors is to advertise. And even a poor guy can do that. The second best is getting word of mouth going.

    Just from those two sources alone he can possibly quit his job within 6 months, even if he doesn't have much money right now. Plenty have already done it.

    Like what I said in the other thread on this subject...let's just agree to disagree.

  16. #16
    SitePoint Zealot himanuzo's Avatar
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    Social bookmarking sites can help you to generate instant traffic for short term.
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  17. #17
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    About.com is owned by the New York Times. iVillage is owned by NBC. Do you imagine that either of these two sites are article dumps for webmasters? Yes, you can certainly inquire about having your own section on these publications but you better be ready to back it up with solid writing skills, query know how, and the ability to follow their guidelines to a T.

    There is a world of difference between a professional writer and a webmaster who just wants to increase his/her traffic through writing articles.

    Site Point also encourages members to submit articles, but the writing must meet their standards. An inexperienced writer who believes typing words on a page makes an article just won't cut it. Writing a good article takes more than just an hour or two, time that could be used more efficiently to increase traffic.
    Last edited by Shyflower; Jan 18, 2008 at 16:02.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  18. #18
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    About.com is owned by the New York Times. iVillage is owned by NBC. Do you imagine that either of these two sites are article dumps for webmasters?
    I said article directoriess are article dumps.


    Yes, you can certainly inquire about having your own section on these publications but you better be ready to back it up with solid writing skills, query know how, and the ability to follow their guidelines to a T.
    Even though there are some good writers there with good content, go read About's content. Most of it is some of the worse I have ever seen. No substance, and it can be read in about a minute. It's as if the, "writer" didn't even try to write qualtiy content. He is more worried about quality than content. In fact, About thinks like that. Most of their articles being piss poor and VERY short shows that.

    I knew one writer who has very good articles that take at least 7 minutes to read. Too long for About. That is what he was told, anyway. But THAT is what most people want. They don't want to read extremely short, empty articles.

    60 seconds later they sit back, throw their hands up in the air, and say: "That's it?!"

    But the occassional "quick tips" short article is different, of course.


    Site Point also encourages members to submit articles, but the writing must meet their standards. An inexperienced writer who believes typing words on a page makes an article just won't cut it. Writing a good article takes more than just an hour or two, time that good be used more efficiently to increase traffic.
    Agreed, but once he has a library of already written QUALITY articles, that work is done. He can then copy and paste them to other content sites, like, sitepoint.

  19. #19
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post

    Agreed, but once he has a library of already written QUALITY articles, that work is done. He can then copy and paste them to other content sites, like, sitepoint.
    A library? Copy & Paste? So you would suggest that writers submit duplicate content to various sites to increase their traffic? Not a good way to build a good working relationship with an online publisher, I think.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  20. #20
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    Online publishers are the typical Joe and Janes with their own version of content sites who already know that the articles will be in other sites.

    Of course they know that. This is common knowledge.

    But they know that an article isn't going to be in every...single...site. The Internet world is way too big for that. About, Askmen, iVillage, Yahoo, MSN know very well that the articles they carry are indeed in others sites, or will be shortly thereafter.

    Many Webmasters NOT ALL, know that if they were to put a stronghold on writers by saying they want it to be exclusive, their content would go WAY down. Then they would have to advertise even more because they are losing readers, because, in turn, there isn't enough GOOD content to read.

    I sure as hell wouldn't work with a Webmaster like that, unless he wants to pay me every single week that he carries the articles. Will he? Nope. Which is why very few will say that the content has to be JUST for his site. It would be ridiculous, and selfish, to demand such a thing.

    Bullz-eye.com does this, but look at how empty their site is, too. They have to do extra advertising to keep their visitors rate high.

    Practicaly all Webmasters aren't going to do something that foolish.

    Offline magazines we buy at the bookstore, like Men's Health, RedBook, Stuff, 0 and even Reader's Digest know that the content will be carried in other magazines, sooner or later. Or, it has already been, time after time.

  21. #21
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    Online publishers are the typical Joe and Janes with their own version of content sites who already know that the articles will be in other sites.

    Of course they know that. This is common knowledge.
    Oh really? Go look at rent-a-coder and see who many Joe and Janes expect exclusive copyright to their delivered projects and while you're there take a look at how rent-a-coder erroneously stipulates that all work submitted through them is a work for hire.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post

    But they know that an article isn't going to be in every...single...site. The Internet world is way too big for that. About, Askmen, iVillage, Yahoo, MSN know very well that the articles they carry are indeed in others sites, or will be shortly thereafter.

    Many Webmasters NOT ALL, know that if they were to put a stronghold on writers by saying they want it to be exclusive, their content would go WAY down. Then they would have to advertise even more because they are losing readers, because, in turn, there isn't enough GOOD content to read.
    I think if you wrote and asked iVillage or one of the other webs you mentioned how happy they are to see the work from their sites plagiarized on other sites, you might be quite surprised at their answer. Have you ever noticed the copyright notice in their footers? It isn't there to add extra content.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    I sure as hell wouldn't work with a Webmaster like that, unless he wants to pay me every single week that he carries the articles. Will he? Nope. Which is why very few will say that the content has to be JUST for his site. It would be ridiculous, and selfish, to demand such a thing.

    Bullz-eye.com does this, but look at how empty their site is, too. They have to do extra advertising to keep their visitors rate high.

    Practicaly all Webmasters aren't going to do something that foolish.
    Why would a webmaster agree to pay you "every single week" for an article he purchased you? Do you imagine that designers pay stock graphic sites every single week for an image they purchase? Besides, from what I read previously, your solution to getting more traffic is submitting free articles... in fact "building a library" for duplicate content submissions.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    Offline magazines we buy at the bookstore, like Men's Health, RedBook, Stuff, 0 and even Reader's Digest know that the content will be carried in other magazines, sooner or later. Or, it has already been, time after time.
    You seriously need to pick up a copy of Writer's Digest to see how main-stream publications purchase their content. In fact, most of them don't purchase freelance articles, relying on a staff of in-house writers whose work is "work for hire". The copyright goes to the publication, not the author.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  22. #22
    SitePoint Evangelist
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    Content is the king in SEO. Also some other techniques for back links like directory and article submission forum posting link excahnge etc..

  23. #23
    He's No Good To Me Dead silver trophybronze trophy stymiee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shakir View Post
    and article submission forum posting link exchange etc..
    Actually those aren't effective SEO techniques. Also, this thread thread is about non-SEO forms of site promotion.

  24. #24
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    Oh really? Go look at rent-a-coder and see who many Joe and Janes expect exclusive copyright to their delivered projects and while you're there take a look at how rent-a-coder erroneously stipulates that all work submitted through them is a work for hire.
    Did I say that there weren't any? Of course there are, but I'm afraid they are far and inbetween.

    Like I said before, a lot of online writes, including myself, will not work with them, which explains why they have very little content in their site. They then have to spend more money on advertising because many of their visitors don't come back because there is very little there on a subject that interests them.


    I think if you wrote and asked iVillage or one of the other webs you mentioned how happy they are to see the work from their sites plagiarized on other sites, you might be quite surprised at their answer. Have you ever noticed the copyright notice in their footers? It isn't there to add extra content.
    Ugh. iVillage already knows that many of the writers who submit their articles to them also submits them to other sites. This has been common knowledge for quite some time now.


    Why would a webmaster agree to pay you "every single week" for an article he purchased you?
    Sigh. I was saying that "every single week" as an example. Of course he isn't going to do that.

    Did you notice the "Will he? Nope" when I said that?


    You seriously need to pick up a copy of Writer's Digest to see how main-stream publications purchase their content. In fact, most of them don't purchase freelance articles, relying on a staff of in-house writers whose work is "work for hire". The copyright goes to the publication, not the author.
    I already have. Some magazines do, while others don't. I never said they all do. But there are enough, in fact, there are A LOT of well-known ones out there who do. They take submissions all the time. They also know that the articles will be published in other sources down the road because these writers use that as one of the ways to put food on the table. Either it will be the same article, or it will be changed a little bit here and there.

    Again, this is common knowledge.

  25. #25
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueMoon32 View Post
    Did I say that there weren't any? Of course there are, but I'm afraid they are far and inbetween.

    Like I said before, a lot of online writes, including myself, will not work with them, which explains why they have very little content in their site. They then have to spend more money on advertising because many of their visitors don't come back because there is very little there on a subject that interests them.

    Ugh. iVillage already knows that many of the writers who submit their articles to them also submits them to other sites. This has been common knowledge for quite some time now.

    Sigh. I was saying that "every single week" as an example. Of course he isn't going to do that.

    Did you notice the "Will he? Nope" when I said that?

    I already have. Some magazines do, while others don't. I never said they all do. But there are enough, in fact, there are A LOT of well-known ones out there who do. They take submissions all the time. They also know that the articles will be published in other sources down the road because these writers use that as one of the ways to put food on the table. Either it will be the same article, or it will be changed a little bit here and there.

    Again, this is common knowledge.
    What you have done here is given specific examples to this forum which are, quite frankly, in error. For instance, both Redbook and O are Hearst publications. If you submit to them "All accepted submissions become the property of Hearst publications". In other words, if you submit what you send to them (copy & paste as you said) to another publication, you are in violation of copyright.

    You also mentioned About.com as an Internet site that knowingly prints duplicate content, yet in their "Be a guide" section it specifically states:

    "Original content (articles, reviews, FAQs, tutorials) written by you"

    as their first requirement.

    In essence, you are trying to pass off as "common knowledge" your ideas on how the real world should work, not how it does work.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown


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