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  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast Site24x7's Avatar
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    Readability calculator tool

    This might be useful for content writers!!

    http://www.standards-schmandards.com.../rix/index.php

    This is a readability index calculator tool. Enter a passage of text in the field and select the language for which the readability is to be calculated. The tool will give you a reading ease score and grade level.

    Have you guys come across any similar tools?
    Site24x7 - Reliable Website Uptime & Performance Monitoring

  2. #2
    SitePoint Guru bronze trophy
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    A tool more suited to the information age is Mystery Matador (online) or Bullfighter (downloadable Word plugin) by fightthebull.com. Going one step beyond simple reading level gauges, this tool aids understandability.

    One, now defunct, online buzzword checker produced a result page web validator style. Your suit/geek nonsense score was publicly available, as was the url to the source text the score was derived from. Like posting the W3C results page in hopes of getting a coder to change, it proved useful in persuading content writers.

    Many words common to the cranking out of web content make your reader roll their eyes. These words are not over their reading level, they're nonsense.

    Related:

    The Most Overused Word in Technical Marketing Solution is the most abused, meaningless yet overused word in technical content writing today.

    Content-Free Buzzword-Compliant Vocabulary List using the words on this list makes the company sound like a Dilbertesque parody website.

  3. #3
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    I took at a look at your second link, DCrux and I think they left a couple out. Two of my favorites are 1) cutting-edge, and 2) state-of-the art.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  4. #4
    SitePoint Enthusiast Mike Newton's Avatar
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    Thanks for the links folks, loved the buzzword list. I have to say that I've been guilty of overusing a few of them.

  5. #5
    Word Painter silver trophy Shyflower's Avatar
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    The tool in the op's link is available in Microsoft word if you use the spell checker and have it set to "check grammar".

    The Flesch-Kincaid "tool" counts syllables to determine readability. So the sentence: "Understand-bananas are essential to healthy existence." comes up with the score of grade level 22 and reading ease -53.

    I tend to believe that most of my readers could easily understand the sentence (no matter how poorly formed) without going to school for 22 years.
    Linda Jenkinson
    "Say what you mean. Mean what you say. But don't say it mean." ~Unknown

  6. #6
    SitePoint Enthusiast ScottyDM's Avatar
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    These days I'm more interested in writing fiction than technical, marketing, or news. I used to do a fair amount of technical writing, but I've found writing good fiction to be harder than any other type of writing. Readers will forgive stilted or wooden language when reading nonfiction as long as the ideas are clear and well organized. Fiction needs to be lyrical and have a flow, as well as grammatically correct and well constructed.

    To that end, and as a final check and before I turn a piece of writing over to my critique group, I like to use an online tool called AutoCrit.

    AutoCrit looks at the small-scale structure, so it can't find large-scale problems, and of course it can't understand content. However, I find it helps me to put that final bit of polish on my prose. I also work it pretty hard. For example when I look at overused words, even if my initial conjunction count is below the average for professionally published work, I still examine every instance. Do I need this one? Do I need that one? Can it be better?

    AutoCrit, yea!

    Scotty
    "I'm obnoxious and disliked, you know that, sir."
    John Adams, 1776 the Musical


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