SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    SitePoint Zealot DarkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    170
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Photoshop Questions

    I've recently migrated from psp7, or at least I'm trying to, but there are still many questions I need help with. They are as such, and I'd thank anyone a lot who can help me:

    1) When I use the oval tool I can't seem to control the outline or the fill colours, it's always just black border, transparent fill

    2) Nor can I anti-aliase the circles, how can I do this?

    3) Is there a way of pasting from the clipboard straight into a new window? In psp7 you could just press ctrl+v and it would go to a new window and ctrl+e to insert it into a current image. With photoshop I have to go through the irritating process of ctrl+n for a new window, then ok, then ctrl+v

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard samsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Atlanta, GA, USA
    Posts
    5,011
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Disclaimer: I've moved away from professional work in Photoshop so my memory of details is a little fuzzy (especially for things that changed between 5 and 6).

    I have never had any luck with the vector shape tools. I would be happy to find out how they actually work but until then I use the select tools which (in my opinion) work better.

    For an oval, get the round select tool and make the shape you want. You can then use "fill", "stroke" and some other stuff from the edit menu to create the shape you want (same thing goes for rectangles, etc). There is an "anti-alias" option for the select tool... by defaulty it is on.

    Also, in the "select" menu you can adjust feathering and other details of the shape before or after you fill.

    I'm not sure about your third question although I'm betting it is something like ctrl-shift-v.

    Does that help any? Or did I miss the point?

    Sam

  3. #3
    SitePoint Zealot DarkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    170
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    select tool?

    And no, a paste option doesn't even appear on the edit menu until I have a new blank window created. Ctrl + alt + v doesn't work either.

  4. #4
    1-800-JMULDER JMulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,745
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, the ellipse marquee tool, right click on the topleft button of your floating navigationbar and you will see the options. Choose the ellipse marquee tool, you can now select an anti-aliased or an aliased selection. You can also fill the selection, contract and hit delete or use the Edit > Stroke command for an outline.

    EDIT: Regarding the quick paste option, I haven't found it but I use an Action to bring up the New Window menu, then I only need to hit that big ENTER button and it will be pasted automatically.
    Last edited by JMulder; Mar 9, 2002 at 16:02.
    Jeroen Mulder

    w: www.jeroenmulder.com

  5. #5
    Photoshop Ninja jonnya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Birmingham UK
    Posts
    733
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just wrote a MASSIVE reply to this, but the session expired when I hit send!! Now I will have to type out the whole thing again!!

    Right, first off, you have made the right choice. Although PSP is an excellent tool, and very good value for money, Photoshop is the choice of professionals. Your dedication to learning the application will pay off, and we will turn you into a Photoshop guru in no time! Anyway, regarding your questions, here goes:

    1) When I use the oval tool I can't seem to control the outline or the fill colours, it's always just black border, transparent fill

    There is often more than one way to create an effect/perform an action in Photoshop, as you will learn in due time. You can create an oval in two ways, which I will outline below:

    >MARQUEE TOOL
    This is basically a selection tool and creates temporary marching ants/dotty line selections. This allows you to quicky select/mask an area of an image for adjustment/filtering. You can create an oval by drawing an oval selection, then press CTRL+Backspace to fill with background colour, ALT+Backspace to fill with foreground colour, or most usefull of all, Shift+Backspace brings up the fill dialogue box, with more options (I use this most of the time). If you create your oval on a new layer (click on the little notepad with folded corner on the bottom of the layers palette), you can move it independantely of the image (I presume you are familiar with PSP layers?).

    You have different types of marquees available. To get to them hold down your mouse button on the marquee tool (top left of tool palette), and more tools will 'flyout'. This also applies to any other tool on this palette that has a little black square in the bottom right corner.

    On your options strip at the top of the screen, you can 'anti alias' the selection. Also, you can see feather. You can imagine this as a mega adjustable anti-alias sort of... it softens the edge of the selection in pixels. To use this you change the value BEFORE you make your selection. If you set it to say 20, then create your oval, and fill it, you will see a 20 pixel soft edge on the fill. Play around with it, and you will soon understand how to get the most out of this feather feature.

    Using this tool to create the oval you descriped is the 'old way' of doing it, you will find the next method much more efficient and editable, although the marquee method is useful in a few applcations.

    >SHAPE TOOL
    This is the best method of creating shapes in Photoshop. It allows you to create vector shapes, that can then be scaled/distored to ANY scale without loss in quality. This is becuase they are not pixel based images, but vector artwork (think Freehand/Illustrator).

    This also has other 'flyout' tools, but they are also available on your options strip when the tool is selected.

    When you create a shape, it will look a bit different to other layers in your layers palette. There is a coloured square (your foreground colour when you drew the shape), and another square next to this showing the shapes. To change the colour of the shape, double click on the colour square. You don't need to worry about the other square too much, as you edit the shape directly on the image.

    Now you have created your shape, you can apply a variety/combination of layer effects to it (just like any other layer). Get to these by clicking the little 'f' in a black circle on the bottom of your layers palette. These are very useful, and allow you to apply a variety of effects like drop shadows, colour fills, outlines and pattern fills. Have a play is the best way! These also remain editable, and you can hide them on the layers palette too.

    IMPORTANT: If you want the shapes and layer effects to remain editable when you save the file, you need to save it as a native Photoshop layered .PSD file. Any other format and the image will be flattened!

    Incidentally, when you flatten a file containing shapes, they will be perfectly anti-aliased.

    You can also 'rasterise' the shapes... (right click on PC, CTRL+click I think on a Mac) on the layer in the layers palette that is turn them into pixels. This is useful if you want to filter the layer with the shape on (eg gausian blur).

    You can also start getting really clever with shapes, using the options on the far left of the options palette (you change the options visible between the two choices by clicking on the shape preview on the layers palette, next to the colour square). One set of these options allows you to create new shape layer, create new work path (for clipping path creation-print production work), and create a filled region (this is like using the marquee tool, and pressing fill all in one go, but you only get one shot, and it is not editable... only usefull with custom shapes and limited applications). The other set of options define how the shapes you add to your existing shape layer interact. For people that have used vector applications, these should be very familiar, and the best way to learn them is to play around with them. for instance, you can get shapes to cut out areas of others, and then move these cutouts around, all with layer effect drop shadows on, and bevels, and all sorts of cool effects!

    To edit the individual shapes, you use the 'Path component select tool' (black arrow) to select whole shape, and the white arrow (on the flyout for this tool) 'Direct Selection Tool' to edit individual points of the vector shape (Shortcut=A, Shift+A to change to next tool on flyout). This allows you to move shapes on the same layer that intersect and react to each other, very useful.

    3) Is there a way of pasting from the clipboard straight into a new window? In psp7 you could just press ctrl+v and it would go to a new window and ctrl+e to insert it into a current image. With photoshop I have to go through the irritating process of ctrl+n for a new window, then ok, then ctrl+v

    This is where you are going to have to get used to a slightly different way of working I'm afraid. The method you are using (CTRL+N, CTRL+V) is the way to do this. However, you may also find it useful when working on an image to 'duplicate' it (with or without flattening the layers) by ALT+I, then press D (Image>Duplicate). Also, you can make a selection with the marquee tool and then Shift+Ctrl+C copies image/selection merged (all visible layers).

    Anyway, hope this helps, and have fun with Photoshop! If you have any more queries post a message here, I'm sure you will find all the help you need as there are loads of Photoshop users on Sitepoint! The best way to learn is to play around with Photoshop. You obviously already have a reasonable grasp of image manipulation from using PSP. Read the tips above, and get to know these tools, they will provide most of the knowledge you need to know of stuff that is different to PSP. Also, use the very good HTML based help files with Photoshop, you will find some very comprehensive information regaring the topics above, and every other aspect of the application.
    Last edited by jonnya; Mar 9, 2002 at 18:46.
    Jonnya Freelance Creative
    UK Freelance designer and web developer
    Website | Portfolio | Photoshop Tips

  6. #6
    SitePoint Wizard samsm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Atlanta, GA, USA
    Posts
    5,011
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh, yeah, it's called the marquee tool, not the "select" tool".

    That's exactly why I wrote a disclaimer.

  7. #7
    Photoshop Ninja jonnya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Birmingham UK
    Posts
    733
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yea, no offence... just thought I better use the 'proper' terms so they can see what they are using from the 'tool tips'... I always thought that this was a silly name for it, and indeed, it should be called the 'select' tool!
    Jonnya Freelance Creative
    UK Freelance designer and web developer
    Website | Portfolio | Photoshop Tips

  8. #8
    SitePoint Zealot DarkMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    170
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you so much jonnya, for such a well thought out and useful reply. Quite amazed that people exist who are willing to put so much effort into a post of that size -- TWICE! Thank's again. And thanks to the others who gave me their information.

    I'm still a little annoyed that it isn't easier to just create a shape with a border, but it'll do, out of interest what is the prefered method then for creating curved corners and lines. Perhaps it was a workaround but on psp I would always use a circle tool with a transparent fill and a border of whatever colour I wanted and then I'd just erase the parts of the circle I didn't want. I've been trying to use the pen tool for these types of things but that too behaves oddly and not as I'd expect. If I choose two points and bend it appropriately rather than create that line it fills up all the space between the curve and the points with a fill colour how, please, do I create common lines that are curved without all these oddities?

    (after your reply jon, I felt compulsed to go to your site, have to say, one of the best portfolio pages I've ever seen, really, really, really well put together, and I'm not just saying that)

  9. #9
    Photoshop Ninja jonnya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Birmingham UK
    Posts
    733
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No worries, I thought that once you had got these principles down, you would be away with Photoshop with your exisiting knowledge of PSP, and actually start using it instead (the sooner you do, the better really!). All my answers are specific to v6, which I presume you have?? They introduced loads of new stuff in this version, and if you havn't got it, v7 is on the horizon, and will be out shortly!

    Regarding your curves and borders, yet again in Photoshop you have different ways of creating them (as I said before, you will get alot of this!).

    -The boarder/outline creation thing is dead easy...look in your layer effects (click little f at bottom of layers palette). I think it's the last one, it's def called 'stroke' though (hence my Sitepoint subtitle of creative stroker incidentally!!). Another funny name (it's used in vector applications), but it puts outlines on ANY layer as it is a layer effect, which are all very useful... have a play with them.

    -A kind of dirty way of creating a border (I say dirty, as this was the common old way before layer effects really) is to simply have your area marqueed off, go to select>modify>border and input width of border in pixels... this will create a 'border/outline' out of your selection. Also check out the other options in select>modify off the top menu, like contract and stuff... very very useful!


    -The shape creation thing...you need to stop thinking about PSP on this one! Use the shape tool!!!! It is very important and powerful, and allows you to edit the points where the lines and curves meet just like a path (like you had drawn it from scratch with the pen tool).

    -The pen tool is an entirely different beast, and I know how tricky this seems to use to start off with. You don't really want to draw shapes with the pen tool, it is for complex cutout tasks and creation of clipping paths for print production. Basically, you click to start a work path and create an anchor point. Then you click again where you want your second anchor point AND drag to create a curve. Otherwise you can just click and DONT drag to create a straight line. If you create a curve between point 1 and 2, you can click again to create a third anchor point and drag to follow a kinda benzier curve afair-it's hard to explain this-but if you go to extremes, this may be the point where they didnt work as expected. However-this is VERY important-BEFORE you create your third point you ALT+click on the second point, and this 'converts' it. You may ask what to, and I don't know the proper name, but you will find that paths behave a-lot better if you use this ALT+Click process, as you control just one curve (between point 2 and 3)instead of two curves (between point 1+2, and 2+3) with your new control point. Tricky to explain, but just remember your ALT+Click on the point you have drawn, unless you wana more flowing, natural curve. Work paths created with the pen tool are a common design task for graphic designers working in print production, if you see anything cut out on a background in magazines or newspapers, it will almost certainly have been done using the pen tool, and saved with a clipping path... this 'cutsout' the area inside the clipping path. Check out the paths palette, this is where you save your work paths (obviously important!!), and create selections (marching ants/dotty selection/marquee, you know what I mean now!) from the paths.

    Phew! Hope that helped!!

    To round up, use the shape tool with layer effects, and modify the shapes using the path component select tool (little black arrow, just over half way down). These are very powerful features!

    Thanks for the praise on the website, I got a few issues with it that need sorting, but it was my baby for a while, and it was fun doing it...I already have new versions of the interface in mind (which I can very easliy change due to the way the site is designed...loads of layers of flash movies and variables!!). I've had a bit of flack about it, but hey, it's not meant to be viewed by grannies at 640x480 on a 386
    Jonnya Freelance Creative
    UK Freelance designer and web developer
    Website | Portfolio | Photoshop Tips


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •