SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 99
  1. #26
    SitePoint Enthusiast fLUx1337's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think there's really a "wrong" framework.

    CakePHP, Zend & Symfony have all major projects based on them, so I think you should just try one and see if you like it, but if you really don't like one of the three, I'm not sure if you will like any?

    I use CakePHP and love it, may try Symfony one day too.....

  2. #27
    SitePoint Zealot imagize's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    197
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pfitz View Post
    If it had propel 1.3 working with it I would be more inclined to spend more time on symfony. PDO and better datetime in 1.3 (and many other improvements).
    The propel1.3 plugin for symfony works just fine. You could also try doctrine.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Guru rageh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    London, Formerly Somalia
    Posts
    612
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tetsuo shima View Post
    And now, to answer your question, I'd go with the Zend Framework.
    I myself tried to get answers to the same question, and in the end decided to try the Zend Framework. I could be persuaded away from it though.

    So I am on all ears too.
    ------------------

  4. #29
    SitePoint Guru rageh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    London, Formerly Somalia
    Posts
    612
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jasper Bekkers View Post
    Trying to answer your question: what does the best framework look like? Answer that question, in depth.
    Your answer is not helpful, to say the very least.
    ------------------

  5. #30
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    288
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally I do not have experience with any framework but I am planning to learn one soon.

    I understand that there is no such thing as "best framework" because different people have different needs, different knowledge, and like to work in diffrent ways.

    What would be very helpful however is some detailed comparison between different frameworks so people can easily find the framework that fits them best. Here I am not just talking about comparison of features, speed of execution and that sort of things, but on the ways and the actual code you have to write to accomplish common tasks or even sample websites and web-apps. Is there such website?

  6. #31
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    385
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have tried, Cake, Zend, Symfony... I ended up with Codeigniter and sticked with it.

  7. #32
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kolkata, India
    Posts
    107
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I too agree and of the same opinion as mentioned above "crux_op"
    that Symfony is ORM agnostic. We can use whatever we want.

  8. #33
    SitePoint Guru
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    672
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I prefer CakePHP.. though Symfony looks interesting.
    Go visit my site :-D you know you want to ;-)
    www.mech7.net

  9. #34
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just my $0.02

    Codeignitor: great sceencasts, one of the very few who get it right. Great documentation, and community. Relatively simple to use. Very weak when it comes to database. No integration with 3rd party products.

    CakePHP: very popular, great community, lots of 3rd party integration - drupal, joomla, and others. PHP 4 & 5. Often criticisized for poor documentation.

    Qcodo: amazing ability to create relational databases quickly and easily. *Horrible* documentation, years out of date (last time I checked). Very small community. Basically a one man project - that makes me feel a little uneasy.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've just give a techtalk about "PHP framework", I'd like to share my viewpoint here:

    The reuse level of php open source project depends on your developer team. For team without developer, "ready to use" applications (such as sugarCRM, vBB) match their requirements; for team with php developer but no UI/UE developer, full featured frameworks like cake, symfony, components collection like ezComponent, zoop may be their favorite; for mature team with enough backend developer and UI/UE developer, engines, classes, libraries, frameworks as infrastructure (such as zend framework, jquery) may be what they need.

    There are lots of excellent php frameworks (see the complete list here: http://www.phpwact.org/php/mvc_frameworks), you can have a try and find which one matches your requirement. FYI, I appreciate zend framework, cakephp and symfony.

  11. #36
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    slide show of the techtalk.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  12. #37
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    CodeIgniter is pretty good, but the lack of Authorisation and ACL components make it a lot worse than it could of been. There are 3rd modules to do the same thing, but they are hard to customise and require some hacking to get them to play nice.

    The documentation however, is second to none and it's great for beginners who are new to the area of MVC frameworks.

    Cake looked good, but the documentation was not as clear and didn't go into much detail.
    leveldesign

    Kind Regards,
    -Matt

  13. #38
    I Never Give Up roosevelt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    515
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I really like Codeigniter and in comparison to CakePHP and some others Codeigninter is much easier to understand and to work with. You will love their documentations!

    CakePHP is ok, its just they have so much stuff but due to lack of a nice documentation people run away from it. Their manual is ok, but it can be made better!

    I didn't really try Zend Framework so can't say anything about it.

    My choices always boil down to the following

    1) ACL System
    2) Easy to use
    3) Lots of examples and documentation
    4) Doesn't require the end user to run the framework from command line

    There really isn't any best, since different frameworks are designed to work some type of CMS. For example codeigniter might be suitable for website CMS but zend could be used to enterprise stuff.

  14. #39
    Non-Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    5,748
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There is nothing to say that Code Igniter couldn't be used in the enterprise though the point you are making is clear; What you could do with one framework, you may well be able to do better using another one instead, for a given task.

    For what it's worth, I'll just re-iterate what has already been said, and that is that there is no best framework - just like one shoe ain't going to fit all feet The only way your going to know if a framework is suitable is to just use it and see how it goes.

    If things don't turn out too well, use another one or develop your own solution but I can see that may not be an option open to all.

  15. #40
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    bhtu
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After trying some frameworks, now I stick with Zend Framework because of these reasons:
    1. The men behind the gun
    2. Superb documentation
    3. Clear roadmap
    4. Extensibility and flexibility (from simple library approach for small apps to fully featured framework for enterprise)

    But in the past, their issue tracker some of the time was down, which is a turn-off.

  16. #41
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophy kyberfabrikken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Posts
    6,157
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WillowCatkin View Post
    The reuse level of php open source project depends on your developer team. For team without developer, "ready to use" applications (such as sugarCRM, vBB) match their requirements; for team with php developer but no UI/UE developer, full featured frameworks like cake, symfony, components collection like ezComponent, zoop may be their favorite; for mature team with enough backend developer and UI/UE developer, engines, classes, libraries, frameworks as infrastructure (such as zend framework, jquery) may be what they need.
    That's a pretty good observation. I haven't heard it being put like that before.

  17. #42
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have only experience with Zend ..in long run ,should be a good idea to play with ,lot's of documentations though.

  18. #43
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kyberfabrikken View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by WillowCatkin View Post
    The reuse level of php open source project depends on your developer team. For team without developer, "ready to use" applications (such as sugarCRM, vBB) match their requirements; for team with php developer but no UI/UE developer, full featured frameworks like cake, symfony, components collection like ezComponent, zoop may be their favorite; for mature team with enough backend developer and UI/UE developer, engines, classes, libraries, frameworks as infrastructure (such as zend framework, jquery) may be what they need.
    That's a pretty good observation. I haven't heard it being put like that before.
    Good breakdown of team types.

    I would personally put symfony in the 3rd group.

    I just finished a major classifieds site where we had a full team with db admins developers, system admins, UI/UE contracted out, custom libraries, classes and plug-ins etc, subversion, QA team and deployment team. Symfony handled all of this extremely well.

  19. #44
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    MidWest, USA
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Symphony and Zend.
    Symphony for speed and a very active core group.
    Zend because of its stability as a company.

    Cakephp seems instable b/c of its leadership driving away segments of its community, never attempted code igniter.
    Web Consultant: Web Design, Development, Optimization.

  20. #45
    Web-coding NINJA! silver trophy beetle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I won't make any "this vs that" style comments here, but I will say that Symfony has just about the best documentation of any open source product I've ever used.
    beetle a.k.a. Peter Bailey
    blogs: php | prophp | security | design | zen | software
    refs: dhtml | gecko | prototype | phpdocs | unicode | charsets
    tools: ide | ftp | regex | ffdev




  21. #46
    SitePoint Evangelist Jhorra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Phoenix, Az
    Posts
    551
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I prefer Zend because of the backing it has, the most likely to stick around and be stable. That being said, it's often difficult to get answers about it as there's not a large community around it.

  22. #47
    SitePoint Member scorps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by walterbyrd View Post
    J
    Qcodo: amazing ability to create relational databases quickly and easily. *Horrible* documentation, years out of date (last time I checked). Very small community. Basically a one man project - that makes me feel a little uneasy.
    Qcodo also has the amazing tools to create stylish user interfaces with built-in ajax support. Documentation is based on the overall videos and texts but what I like most are the examples. I learned this framework in 2 weeks using those examples. Better than usual long boring documents. Also it's core is maintained by a company not just one man. The project has recently got many new core contributors and the community also contributes a lot. Its got excellent orm+oql, ajax, event driven component-based UI, PHP 5 E_STRICT support and it genereates the basic crud + search code for immediately.

    If the community is small it does not mean that its bad. There are just too many bad frameworks out there although they might be popular.

    As I recall Cake and CI are not pure PHP 5 frameworks?

  23. #48
    SitePoint Zealot Mau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    134
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by beetle View Post
    I won't make any "this vs that" style comments here, but I will say that Symfony has just about the best documentation of any open source product I've ever used.
    Hear hear! The best part is that the symfony community is quite casual, but yet still produces such high-quality code, documentation, and plugins.

  24. #49
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    232
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I think professional developers have responsibilities when developing web applications. Not only security, but also scalability, compatibility, flexibility and extensibility along many others. Including the smallest web application requires a solid system architecture. And a professional developer should always know about system architecture. At home, you can get away with murder, but at work, your decisions will affect not only your development team, but also your company and future developers. If you use a technology or language that is obsolete, I can almost guarantee that your system will end up being re-designed, and your company loosing money. So, you should always ask yourself. Is this system secure? Does it scale? Is it flexible enough? Will I be able to extend it? Am I using the right technology? Am I using the latest stable release?

    In the last 2 years, I have re-designed many applications (mainly CMS). Most of them built on top of CodeIgniter and Cake. People keep telling me that they've used these frameworks because they are smaller in size and provide better documentation. Funny they say that, because other frameworks, like Zend, offer a better architecture, are smaller in size, and provide more documentation. If you are thinking "Umm, Zend smaller in size?", yes, you just need a couple of its components to start developing enterprise MVC applications.
    Last edited by phpimpact; Dec 4, 2007 at 15:23.

  25. #50
    SitePoint Addict Hafsoh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    393
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by n0other View Post
    It amazes me no one has mentioned Symfony yet. It has a bigger learning curve, but once you've been through it, you never look back.
    I go with you but symfony is good for a complex website not really for a small size sites.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •