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  1. #1
    SitePoint Member johnrowe's Avatar
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    Making the transition from one man show to ...

    Hi.

    I am seeking advice on moving my business from a one man show to taking in the very first employee.

    I figure I can pay a fixed monthly salary and i have purchased another PC for this employee.

    I do not have offices yet but I am getting to busy to cope with all the work and I am beginning to get more and more calls from companies that have seen my work and wants me to do some work for them.

    I do know I would have to get busy bringing in as much work as possible in order to keep up with expenses.

    Anyway, I know any business must get to this stage and then try and transition as smoothly as possible.

    Please share your wisdom and thoughts on this very important stage so that I can learn and avoid possible mistakes.

    Thanks

    John

  2. #2
    Serial Entrepreneur
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    Jul 2007
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    Considering finding nearby subcontractors instead. You become the face to the public and structure the work so that the subcontractor takes on some of the load for some of the money you make on your overload. That way if things don't pan out and this busy time doesn't last, you don't have to fire anyone.

    It's work to manage an employee OR a subcontractor, so be prepared for headaches you never anticipated.

    If the headaches get too painful, consider saying "no" to clients on the low end of the money spectrum.
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  3. #3
    SitePoint Member
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    Hi John

    I am in exactly the same position as you, I have more work than I can possibly do on my own and lots of strong leads where I am the only person in the frame for doing new sites. I have decided to do what amf45 has suggested and outsource some of the work. I will still do the design and I will outsource the coding. I have decided to start by outsourcing simple projects to reduce my risk and I am actively building relationships with local freelancers to widen my network.

    The benefit of doing it this way is that you don't have the overheads and you don't have to pay for someone if you don't have the work.

    Good luck
    Julie

  4. #4
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    My advice would be to either try a freelancer or get a student or someone that have some hours free.

    Whatever you decide to do, always think about the future! It takes time to get a person to learn how to do work for you, and if you can train a person that later on can be employed by you its great! So even if you don't employ the person now, think about the possibility!

    Depending on where in the world you live there are laws about employment! Read up on them before you employ someone! Here in Sweden we have lots of responsibilities if the persons get sick and such. Can be hard for a small business if you employ a person that gets "sick" every second day...

  5. #5
    SitePoint Zealot beejereeno's Avatar
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    I agree that it's a better option to go with a contractor/subcontractor type of situation. This way you don't have to worry about anyone expecting healthcare/benefits/paid time off, etc. I would definitely think that if someone hired me as an "employee" that would mean that my employment is at will, and I could leave OR be fired anytime without reason. "Employee" also implies a different relationship than contractor or subcontractor.

    I am also slowly expanding and am doing it in a way that involves little to no risk. I am hiring an art director, sales manager and project manager, all on commissions. They understand that if there are no sales being made by them, that they don't get paid. If I've got a star salesperson, I can thereby afford to give them income on a percentage basis, which begets commission to the other two people. We all win that way.

    You could also try to get an intern. Local universities/colleges are teeming with students who need to complete and internship. What a perfect way to get some extra work done in a year or less. Who knows, if they are great you could already have a promising employee for when you can afford to really start hiring.
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