SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    SitePoint Wizard Another Designer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,369
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question ASP.Net and Dreamweaver?

    Hi,

    I am a front end designer. The programmers I am working with want me to start a "new" design in Dreamweaver by choosing ASP.Net C#. I'm only experienced creating for an .html extension. Then they told me to save it for Active Server Plus (aspx) extensions.

    Can I design without problems by doing it this way? When I go to Dreamweaver's preview window I can't see the web page in any of the browsers! Do I have to upload in order to view the pages?

    Do I use the .apsx extensions in each of the links when linking from page to page?

    This is all very new to me.

    Thank you for your help.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Wizard rbutler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    1,867
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can design any web page with an ASP.NET extension (aspx). ASP.NET pages are still just text files. Viewing it inside DW can sometimes be tricky if you're working with a database server. In that case, you will need to set up Internet Information Services (IIS) locally and view it from there. You also link to these pages the same as you would with a .html extension.
    Ryan Butler

    Midwest Web Design

  3. #3
    SitePoint Wizard Another Designer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,369
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by rbutler View Post
    You can design any web page with an ASP.NET extension (aspx). ASP.NET pages are still just text files. Viewing it inside DW can sometimes be tricky if you're working with a database server. In that case, you will need to set up Internet Information Services (IIS) locally and view it from there. You also link to these pages the same as you would with a .html extension.
    Thanks. So I guess I will have to use the Remote Info option and Access the FTP? Local/Network? WebDav? RDS? or the Microsoft Visual sourceSafe?

    My guess is I use the FTP if I want to view it from the server, or the Local/Network if I want to view it from the directory on my hard drive. Am I currect about this?

    Thank you again.

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard rbutler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    1,867
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can view the files using localhost if you have the files on your local hard drive. In this example, just switch out the connection string to reference the appropriate location or database server. Or if you have a development server, post the files to this server first, then post to the production box once you're ready.

    It doesn't really matter how you post the files, FTP or saving directly to a network server will work.
    Ryan Butler

    Midwest Web Design

  5. #5
    SitePoint Wizard gRoberts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Birtley, UK
    Posts
    2,439
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think you should use Dreamweaver for ASP.Net developement. I haven't checked CS3's ability but IIRC all previous versions of Dreamweaver that supported ASP.Net didn't use Code Behind.

    Because of this, it simply add's the first line which defines the language, and allows you to go a few extra things.

    Your better off doing what you normally do.


  6. #6
    SitePoint Wizard Another Designer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,369
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gRoberts View Post
    I don't think you should use Dreamweaver for ASP.Net developement. I haven't checked CS3's ability but IIRC all previous versions of Dreamweaver that supported ASP.Net didn't use Code Behind.

    Because of this, it simply add's the first line which defines the language, and allows you to go a few extra things.

    Your better off doing what you normally do.
    But I'm a designer. I know nothing about ASP.Net. So I have to design using Dreamweaver. Can I design using Dreamweaver and give it to the programmers so they can use it for ASP.net? What is the easiest way to do this?

    Thanks for your help.

  7. #7
    SitePoint Wizard rbutler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    1,867
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes you can design your pages with DW. The whole idea behind work flow management in ASP.NET is for designers to work on the design file (aspx) file while programmers can work on the code behind (VB.NET or C#) file at the same time.
    Ryan Butler

    Midwest Web Design

  8. #8
    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy
    wwb_99's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    10,576
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Arguably the easiest way to do things is for the design team to build the designs in whatever toolset they use then pass static HTML off to the development team for them to ".NETize".

    Other decent option is to get your hands on MS Expression Web, their web design program. The advantage being that Expression can handle visual studio solution/project files so you can share the same project from source control and such.

  9. #9
    SitePoint Wizard
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,274
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are strictly a front end developer, I see no reason why you can't use DW, although I think you should consider VS2008 (see below).

    It is true that DW doesn't generate the @Page directive for referencing a codebehind file. But once the "back end" developers get hold of your page there's no reason why they can't edit the directive to point to a codebehind file for the logic.

    Even if you do implement some handling in your page yourself, they should be able to move that code into the codebehind as well. It takes just a cut-n-paste operation to do this.

    The tricky part is when you need to test with live testdata. For this you need an IIS installed on your machine, but more importantly you need access to real data or mock-up data.

    You may ask the backend developers to supply you with some real or mock-up facade objects (e.g. in the form of an assembly which you drop into the /bin directory). Such facade objects can then be used with the ObjectDataSource control.

    That would allow you to design and <i>test</i> using the advanced control types of ASP.NET such as Repeater, GridView etc, and even AJAX controls. Typically, as a front end developer you are also responsible for the user experience, i.e. the dynamic behavior.

    ASP.NET Master Pages is an essential feature for most sites. It's like DW templates on steroids. DW doesn't support master pages very well in design view. However, if you preview using a server, you will get the real results rendered.

    ---------------------

    Having said all this, I think you should take a good long look at the free Visual Studio 2008 Express. It is in beta2 now, feature complete. IMHO it surpasses DW also as a front-end development tool. It comes with a built-in webserver (no setup required). You would still need the mock facade objects to do testing, though. All of the relevant DW features are covered by this tool, and it has some really compelling features for e.g. JavaScript development.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •