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Thread: SWF size

  1. #1
    SitePoint Evangelist
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    SWF size

    Well...I've never discuss the power of flash to decrease a file size but....I'm working with a FLA file that has 1,78MB and the SWF has 1,35MB. I was expecting to be more 'thin'.
    Maybe the problem is in the number of images that I used on the file.
    They are JPGS and GIF. The JPGS are to 50% compression and the GIF to Lossless PNG/GIF.

    Is another way of decreasing the size? (YES! Maybe putting all to 0% compression)


  2. #2
    Gone!
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    A large amount of graphics files are definately going to produce larger file sizes as Flash wont compress images anymore than they already are. If you use images then they are going to take the same amount of time to load as if they were in a normal HTML page.

    The only way to taclke this kind of problem is to preload each page or scene in the movie, but this will be frustrating for hifhspeed connections let alone 56k'ers.

  3. #3
    SitePoint Member SwiftRanchero's Avatar
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    As a 56ker I agree that long-loading flash movies are a pain. So, its always a good idea to have an LPB and an HPB version of the same movie. Try compressing the images in 3rd party software (PS) and/or your audio, lower the bitrate. I personally like the higher quality movies.

    Try running the movie in separate sections which will allow HPBs to catch up on the DLs. Enabling preloading while watching and all that other jazz.
    SwiftRanchero
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    SitePoint Wizard creole's Avatar
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    Let's move this into our brand new Flash only forum.
    Adobe Certified Coldfusion MX 7 Developer
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  5. #5
    Pixel Junkie flux's Avatar
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    Hi magi...are you importing already compressed images (JPG?) because then indeed, you won't be able to compress the image more than it already has been compressed. It's imho always better to import 100% quality jpg's into flash and then let flash take care of the compression.

    If you import non compressed images and then use jpg compression to create your swf, the total filesize should be dramatically lower (10 to 20% of the original filesize).

    You should also make sure some compression settings are not contradicting other compression settings...you can e.g. set the compression when you publish your movie (in the publish settings), but also in the Bitmap properties for every bitmap seperately.

    this is done via the Library (F7) --> rightclick a bitmap in the library and select properties --> in the panel that pops on screen you can choose if you want the 'document default quality' is used or if you want to set the compression manually. This feature overrules the compression as set in the publish settings.

  6. #6
    Photoshop Ninja jonnya's Avatar
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    I always prefer (if Im not feeling lazy!!) to individually compress the images outside of Flash, and then bring up the properties for that image, and tell it to use my compression, rather than Flashes. I've not had a major problem with the JPEG compression within Flash, but if you really want to slim those images down, I prefer to use the 'save for web' in Photoshop to squeeze every last drop out of them, but still retain quality.

    I would agree that you need to split the movie up, and load individual sections into layers. This is very easy to do, and allows the viewer to just download the bits they are interested in, rather than wait for the whole thing to pre-load. For instance, my site is getting on for 1700k on the server, yet the viewer only has to wait for 40 odd k to stream in, and they have the whole interface and contact section!! The site is made up of over 100 swf's that are loaded on layers.

    You could also put small images in the movie, that link to larger images in pop-up windows. This way the visitor can see the image fairly quickly at a reasonable quality, and then choose to download a bigger, better quality version (just done this on my site too
    Jonnya Freelance Creative
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