SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 78
  1. #26
    Almeaty Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Nowhere
    Posts
    278
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since we are here now talking about jobs, skills etc....

    Is it really necessary to have studied (be in university) if I would like to be a webmaster or admin? Would this help? Also for web-designers.

    Until now I've done any single HTML file by hand (no tools!) and I hope I can count myself on the more experienced HTML programmers. Currently I'm trying to get some knowledge in CGI, PHP, and mySQL.

    ------------------
    Matthias Hagemann

    Need some source code?
    icosmoss.com - The Open Source Community

  2. #27
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi Shaila

    I hope you donít mind me answering your email in this forum. This way others can take advantage of the advises, and everyone can tell me how bloody wrong I am

    > Thanks for the advise

    No problem

    > Can u tell me some good sites learn ASP

    Sure I can.

    First of all, you have to realise that ASP is not a programming language. It's a way to implement programming into your webpages, and let the server interpret this programming. You can use a number of programming languages to work with ASP, but I would recommend using VBScript - a cut-down version of the Visual Basic programming language. Keeping as much as possible within Microsoft might not be politically correct, and I certainly donít enjoy doing it, but it saves you a lot of fuzz later on.

    The VBScript homepage is at: http://www.msdn.microsoft.com/scripting/ . I don't really know any great starting points for learning VBScript as I was already a Visual Basic programmer when I started exploring VBScript, but there is a fair tutorial at the VBScript homepage, and another one at: http://idm.internet.com/corner/aitken/vbs-1.shtml . Another good point of entry might be at: http://www.vb-web-directory.com/sear...47,4d9,00.html . This page contains quite a few links to ASP, VBScript etc.

    Some good resources on ASP are:

    * "ASPToday" http://www.asptoday.com/
    * "4 Guys From Rolla" http://www.4guysfromrolla.com/webtech/
    * "ASP News" http://www.aspnews.com/
    * "ASP Alliance" http://www.aspalliance.com/
    * "Microsoft ASP" http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/c...ts/catalog.asp
    * "The ASP Resource index" http://www.aspin.com/ (an ASP portal)
    * "ASP Today" http://www.asptoday.com/
    * "Webmonkey" http://hotwired.lycos.com/webmonkey/programming/asp/
    * "LearnASP" http://www.learnasp.com/

    The best place to start might just be at aspin.com and look into the "tutorials" section. A nice tutorial is located at: http://www.stardeveloper.com/asp_tutorial_1.asp , and checking into Webmonkey never hurts (I love those guys!).

    There are even a few servers out there providing free webspace and that'll let you use both ASP and databases - a great way to get your hands dirty in no-time. Check out: http://www2.ewebcity.com/home/index.asp , and excellent (!!!) service providing 30 Megs of webspace, ASP support and Access DB support. All of this for free. See also: http://www.aspin.com/home/software/aspserve

    The only way of getting that $30,000/month job as a WebGuru is to be the best at EVERYTHING, so get down and dirty as soon as possible. The more techniques you know by heart, the better job (read: pay and artistic freedom) you'll be able to get.

    A tip is to also learn how to use Microsoft Visual Interdev. See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/vinterdev/default.asp . Iím planning on doing that myself any day soonÖ

    > I am presently studying Adobe Photoshop

    With your background, only knowing Frontpage and Photoshop, you might eventually find that programming is for geeks, databases are for losers who writes "SQL" instead of "school", and that the only Shell you want to explore surrounds a macadamia nut. In that case, I suggest you learn how to find each command in Photoshop with your eyes closed (using keyboard shortcuts is cheating) and apply for job as a graphics designer at Webcompany Inc.

    > I have also applied for some volunteer positions as a web designer.

    Excellent idea Ė I donít believe anybody has ever got a job at a web company without having at least one good website to show for.

    Best Regards
    Big Nothing

  3. #28
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    East Lansing, MI USA
    Posts
    12,937
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Its not necessary for you to go to school and in some cases its impossible.

    In this industry new things show up all the time and the skills you need are constantly evolving.

    How can a university keep up? How many people out there would be qualified to teach ASP PHP or Cold Fusion? And of those people how many would like to take a huge paycut I'm sure to work for a university?

    You pretty much have to be self taught to be a web designer, classes you can take will always ben a few years behind. If you do find a class that is offered look at the description, chances are you'll find that its teaching "new" techologies like cgi and javascript and html.

    Chris

  4. #29
    The Hiding One lynlimz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    Sorry for the long reply. Shaila. Yes, I'm form singapore. You can contact me at: webmaster@nortiq.com
    from there, I'll direct you to my "real" e-mail address.

    Hmm..thanks guys for the webtv etc.! HELPS 100%!!! let me test it out =)

    and one note, no..ther arne't any restrictions for one to be web designer programmer etc. Unless you working for others in a company..they might have their own regulations...
    basically, I'm still schooling...in secondary school. so....its perfectly fine!

    thanks
    Nortiq Web Services http://nortiq.com

  5. #30
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wes DeMoney: I also started out coding HTML using Notepad. Nowadays, however I "always" use WYSIWYG (Dreamweaver). Being able to fix minor twaks in the code is important, but not necessarily for everyone involved in a project. When you start working for a web company someone else always have to fill in for the tasks that you can't do. In other words - I don't think that being able to code HTML is vital to the career of a web designer.

    DIMA: I don't have _any_ formal education in the field of web works. Although for graphical/design positions, many companies ask specifically for people with designer background.

    Regarding the "I write HTML/I use Frontpage" question I'd dare say that you won't be able to find a job if all you know is HTML! You _might_ get a job if you're good at Frontpage/Dreamweaver or similar - No real website project is nowadays entirely coded in pure HTML.

    Any other oppinions on this matter?

    Best regards to ye'all
    Big Nothing



  6. #31
    The Hiding One lynlimz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    I agree with you.
    Having/Using/Knowing a WYSIWYG editor is the crucial if yoy want to be a web designer. Then again, you must use the editor only for efficiency and speedy of your creation. notepad or any text editor would ocme in handy when you need to tidy your code etc.

    Comptetions specify that you design web sites using notepad...so maybe thats one to your point! =)

  7. #32
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>I agree with you.
    Having/Using/Knowing a WYSIWYG editor is the crucial if yoy want to be a web designer.
    Then again, you must use the editor only for efficiency and speedy of your creation. notepad or any text editor would ocme in handy when you need to tidy your code etc.

    Comptetions specify that you design web sites using notepad...so maybe thats one to your point! =)
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Funny.. Most professionals choose to use Homesite. It is the editor of choice among web developing professionals, outselling any other editor. Yet its a code editor not a WYSIWYG editor. I, personally, will not use a WYSIWYG editor even though I have tried them. I don't even consider myself has having learned how to use any of them properly. Everyone of the programs in that genre that I have tried has produced such mangled code that it is easier for me to "do it by hand".

    ------------------
    Wayne Luke - Sitepoint Forums Administrator
    Digital Magician Magazine - MetaQuark Creations (Coming Soon)
    sitepoint@digitalmagician.com

  8. #33
    The Hiding One lynlimz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    2,103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I see...
    hmm..
    What about homesite? is it very good?
    I always look to try new software...=)

    the problem is coz i use frontpage 98 and 2000 and am like attached to it or something? its not because its a good WYSIWYG editor...
    i use it because of the web site feature...
    whereby, you create a web site and the pages etc. are all handled by forntpage ( but i do not let it edit my links whenever i move my pages around...)
    i have no idea too..but I'll feel very awkard if i use another editor. maybe also coz of the interface?

  9. #34
    Gong!
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    229
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How true. I've tried Dreamweaver, HotDog (and Netscape Composer ), but I have noticed that it is easier for me to write it straight by using a Notepad/Textpad, not to mention that it's more clearlier and 100% validate HTML.

    But, if someone's used to use WYSIWYG editors and feel that they are more comfortable, then use 'em. Atleast complex tables are easier to create with WYSIWYG editors, but you can do them by hand too.

  10. #35
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    wluke: I would have to disagree with you on this one. Most web professionals _I_ know use Dreamweaver (or Frontpage, if they are Microsoftified). However, I would think that this varies as much as the opinions on this board. Personally, I use Homesite as a "second tool" - I develop my pages in Dreamweaver, and if any code debugging is necessary (which it usually isnít - Dreamweaver makes some pretty nice code), I might resort to Homesite.

    All ways are good ways - except the bad ways.

    Regards
    Big Nothing



  11. #36
    SitePoint Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I love the analogy!
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>Originally posted by aspen:
    This is exactly like Calculators and Grade Schoolers. When you're in 4th grade you don't get to use a Calculator to do that long division. You have to sit there, and work out every last problem. But then by the time you're in highschool you get to use a Calculator on everything, because you know how to do it by hand, you know how it works, you know how to apply, a calculator just speeds up the tedious part. So dont be reliant on a Calculator. Learn the basics first, then use a Calculator to speed things up.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


  12. #37
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>
    wluke: I would have to disagree with you on this one. Most web professionals _I_ know use Dreamweaver (or Frontpage, if they are Microsoftified). However, I would think that this varies as much as the opinions on this board. Personally, I use Homesite as a "second tool" - I develop my pages in Dreamweaver, and if any code debugging is necessary (which it usually isnít - Dreamweaver makes some pretty nice code), I might resort to Homesite.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Homesite is the #1 one selling professional HTML Editor. It is the ones copycats (Evrsoft FirstPage2000) aspire to be.

    I will never use Dreamweaver simply because in my opinion the interface was just not planned out properly. I don't want each menu in its own thread, I want each document in its own thread but I do not want the interface taking up to 50% of my system resources because each little dialog box is a thread. The fact that the built in editor has absolutely no features and that I had to revert to Homesite to accomplish 90% of my work in the long run anyway was also a big drawback.

    The fact that about my work is broke down into about 15% HTML, 25% javascript, and 60% ASP probably has a big thing to do with it. Maybe if I was building simple HTML sites I would like the WYSIWYG features more. And before you mention it, I tried Dreamweaver Ultra Dev and all I could see is that they took a very good program (Drumbeat 2000) and destroyed it with their interface. I own Drumbeat 2000, but will never upgrade to Ultra Dev. I will move on to a program like Tango or Companion as they have a better interface and about 100 times the database capabilities.

    ------------------
    Wayne Luke - Sitepoint Forums Administrator
    Digital Magician Magazine - MetaQuark Creations (Coming Soon)
    sitepoint@digitalmagician.com

    [This message has been edited by wluke (edited August 11, 2000).]

  13. #38
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    East Lansing, MI USA
    Posts
    12,937
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>Having/Using/Knowing a WYSIWYG editor is the crucial if yoy want to be a web designer<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I promise I can code faster by hand that 99% of people can with a wysiwig editor, my code will be cleaner, easier to read, smaller, more efficient, more compatible with all browsers etc.

    And also wysiwyg editors will always be behind the industry. When a new design technology comes out people have to learn, then those people have to code into these programs, then the program has to be released, then you have to buy it, then you have to learn the program and chances are alot of the code too.

    Or you can just learn how to code and skip the above steps and be making pages with this new technology before those dependent on wysiwyg editors even own something that can do it for them.

    Wysiwyg editors are a crutch and nothing more.

    Chris

  14. #39
    SitePoint Addict
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    District of Columbia
    Posts
    373
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ::agreeing with the two replies above::

    I use Homesite (well, Cold Fusion Studio to be exact, but its similar) to code. I have used DW for initial layout, but I found that if I use photoshop fpr layout and code by hand i get better code, faster load times. I guess just as in wayne's case I do mostly CF code, and try looking at your pages in DW after you have added CF tags and javascript... brrrrrr....

    as for the new technology - I dont believe either FP or DW are good with XML, or XHTML (ha-ha!!!!!!) or SVG's. We will be using SVG any day now, I am very excited!

  15. #40
    SitePoint Guru CJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Mechelen, Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    684
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I do not agree with the two posts above:

    1. I'm sure you can't code as fast as someone who has some experience with any wysiwyg editor. I can create a whole table with 10 rows and 3 columns with FP2000 in 5 secs. You gotto show me how you do that in 5 secs... Also FP2000 saves the code in a very organised way. You can set how it should look.

    2. FP2000 and DW3 support the new technologies the same as any other editor, being text or wysiwyg editor. Nothing stops you to get in the HTML code your self. The two editors named above have excellent HTML editors built in. May I also remember you that those two were designed for HTML and not for XML. I'm sure though there will be added more XML support in the next version so you don't have to go coding. But it's surely recommended you buy a program which is specialised in something.

    Christophe


    ------------------
    Freesources.net - the ultimate webmaster resources site
    WebmasterCJ design - opening new worlds for small prices

  16. #41
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    East Lansing, MI USA
    Posts
    12,937
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>1. I'm sure you can't code as fast as someone who has some experience with any wysiwyg editor. I can create a whole table with 10 rows and 3 columns with FP2000 in 5 secs. You gotto show me how you do that in 5 secs... Also FP2000 saves the code in a very organised way. You can set how it should look.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    An empty table maybe but what good is that, you still have to type in the info into the cells, whereas me I type at 110 wpm and fill in the table as I make it which negates any bonus you'd get from the wysiwyg editor to nil.

    Chris

  17. #42
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>
    . FP2000 and DW3 support the new technologies the same as any other editor, being text or wysiwyg editor. Nothing stops you to get in the HTML code your self. The two editors named above have excellent HTML editors built in. May I also remember you that those two were designed for HTML and not for XML. I'm sure though there will be added more XML support in the next version so you don't have to go coding. But it's surely recommended you buy a program which is specialised in something.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Oh I didn't know they had support for Accessibility, ASP, ASP+, CSS2, CSS3, DOM2, MathML, P3P, PICS, PNG, RDF, SMIL, SVG, TVWeb, WebCGM, XForms, XHTML, XLink, XML, XML Query, XML Schema, XML Signature, XPointer, XSL.

    HTML has seen its last revision and specification release. You have to wait for a version release to support any of the above technologies easily in your editor. I just need to learn what I need as I go. Of course you can do the same thing but the WYSIWYG editors will screw it up if it doesn't recognize it. I have tried every version of Frontpage and Dreamweaver 3 and neither live up to my personal standards of creating cross-browser standard code, meaning when run through the HTML validator in Homesite it doesn't have a single error or warning without editing. Since the standard is widely published and both Microsoft and Macromedia sit on the board, I don't see that as too much to ask.


    ------------------
    Wayne Luke - Sitepoint Forums Administrator
    Digital Magician Magazine - MetaQuark Creations (Coming Soon)
    sitepoint@digitalmagician.com

    [This message has been edited by wluke (edited August 11, 2000).]

  18. #43
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Palo Alto, CA
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh, i love these anti wysiwyg/fp/m$ parties!
    looks like all of ya bomb ass coders, designers, java gurus... and so on. Just use ur copy of FP and be quite.

  19. #44
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Please watch your language in the forums.

    ------------------
    Wayne Luke - Sitepoint Forums Administrator
    Digital Magician Magazine - MetaQuark Creations (Coming Soon)
    sitepoint@digitalmagician.com

  20. #45
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Palo Alto, CA
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i do.

    looks like here is something special, no1 uses dw/fp... give me a break! I do using DW for site layout. Simply because the HTML is low-level "language" and I dont really care how clean it is... if it works, it works for me. HTML not Java or C. And dont tell me that if i do this with HTML im not good in Java or so... But also I have a copy of EditPlus and Nedit (on my linux box). Which is best tools for me. Im a Java developer, and I can say (TRUE) that i dont use any wysiwyg editor... simply because there is no such editors to for Java BUT im sure at least 60% of people here uses dw/fp for web development, and same time telling how bad it is to do so... And why when some1 starts thread about wysiwyg programs, every1 trying to put their 5 cents about how bad it is? People are free to use anything they want! And actually that guy didnt asked any1 to tell him about FP, 'coz like he said, he knows FP.
    Ahhh...go back to PHP.....

  21. #46
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Palo Alto, CA
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh...maybe he/she is a gurl
    anyway :]

  22. #47
    Serial Publisher silver trophy aspen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    East Lansing, MI USA
    Posts
    12,937
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I really hate teenybopper speech. How hard is it to type out a complete word?

  23. #48
    SitePoint Guru CJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Mechelen, Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    684
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>Originally posted by aspen:
    I really hate teenybopper speech. How hard is it to type out a complete word?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Let's not begin with 'teenybopper' things. I hate abbreviations with 1 and 8 etc etc but I know not only teens use them...

    Cya l8ter :-p

    Christophe

    ps: WLUKE give me any editor which has support for accesebility... Why should FP2000 support less techs as Homesite? Homesite has to be upgraded too to support new techs or does it 'learn' them? :-)

    For new technologies MS made NotePad. It is free with every wonderfull copy of Windows. :-D

    ------------------
    Freesources.net - the ultimate webmaster resources site
    WebmasterCJ design - opening new worlds for small prices

  24. #49
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Lancaster, Ca. USA
    Posts
    12,305
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote/font><HR>
    ps: WLUKE give me any editor which has support for accesebility... Why should FP2000 support less techs as Homesite? Homesite has to be upgraded too to support new techs or does it 'learn' them? :-)
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Actually it learns them. Homesite has what is called a "Tag Library". When ever a new specificition comes out you can add the tags for it. Since Homesite uses a custom markup langauge for its interface you can build wizards and tools to utilize the tags you use most more efficiently. But since it uses an external browser for rendering the pages it doesn't need to know how to show the tags like a WYSIWYG editor does. So when I wish to use tags associated with the WAI (Web Accessibility Initiative), I just have to add them to the library and support is automatic.

    I have never once told people not to use Frontpage or Dreamweaver, I have only said that they don't fit my work style and stated why. Both of them create more work for me. I am a programmer by nature, I don't create visually. It doesn't work for me. It is much easier for me to add the substance than go back and put the visual elements later which is the exact same way you would build a stand alone application. That is exactly how I view each individual website, as a stand alone application. In my personal experience WYSIWYG editors have doubled or tripled my workload. Though of course your own experience may be different.

    Use whatever editor is best for you. That is my answer to the question "Which is the best HTML Editor" every time it comes up. Only after that do I talk about the system that I find the best to use and in my experiences neither Dreamweaver or Frontpage are viable options for me.

    This debate is about as pointless as trying to get someone to change their favorite color but I do feel that a newcomer to the field who has tried only one editor should try them all before making a permenant choice or even multiple choices. Since they all come with 30 day downloads it doesn't cost anything.

    I have tried them before and settled on what works for me. Even though that is true, I still try each new version of Dreamweaver, Frontpage, or other editors I hear about to see if they might fit my needs better. I haven't found one that beats the Homesite and Textpad combo I use. Homesite for in-depth development and Textpad for quick and dirty changes. I have heavily customized both though and they have similar interfaces, the same quick-keys for commands and a lot of other interface tweaks.

    ------------------
    Wayne Luke - Sitepoint Forums Administrator
    Digital Magician Magazine - MetaQuark Creations (Coming Soon)
    sitepoint@digitalmagician.com

  25. #50
    SitePoint Guru CJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Mechelen, Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    684
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You're making a point wluke :-)

    But anyway... It ought to be possible for MS and MacroMedia to add a feature in their program which updates the program everytime new technologies are there.

    Ok I know why they didn't add it already (what's the point then to upgrade) but if you put a program which includes those regular updates for sale at 25% more of the cost than the one without. This way you could also prevent the program to be copied illegaly.

    Christophe



    ------------------
    Freesources.net - the ultimate webmaster resources site
    WebmasterCJ design - opening new worlds for small prices


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •