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  1. #1
    SitePoint Guru Skyblaze's Avatar
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    Finished the book...

    today i finished sitepoint's rails book and i now can say that this book rocks. Now i want a second book from the same author to go further on more advanced concepts

  2. #2
    SitePoint Guru Skyblaze's Avatar
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    what do you advise to read now to progress further in rails? Do i have to code some first? Or maybe both! Anyway i really don't like agile web development with rails and it also has a great error for me...It creates, in its example application, a controller for the admin part and one for the user part and as now i know that is bad design.
    I'm lokking for peepcode.com screencasts they seem great!

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    ☆★☆★ silver trophy vgarcia's Avatar
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    Peepcode is pretty good, try those screencasts. You can also read the Rails Recipes book. It's from the Pragmatic Programmers but it's not written the same way. Each chapter shows you how to do something different, i.e. building a Rails app that uses multiple databases, a chapter on things you can do with ActionMailer, etc.

  4. #4
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    Wow, I am surprised that you would comment on the techniques in the Agile book as being "bad design". The Agile book is by far, the most up-to-date and cohesive primer on Rails that is out there right now. This book is almost ALWAYS recommended as the defacto starting point for learning Rails.

    Anyway, the Ruby for Rails book by David Black is also a great book to check out. It really gets down and dirty with the core of both Rails and Ruby. Give it a look......

  5. #5
    SitePoint Guru Skyblaze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DigitalRealm View Post
    Wow, I am surprised that you would comment on the techniques in the Agile book as being "bad design". The Agile book is by far, the most up-to-date and cohesive primer on Rails that is out there right now. This book is almost ALWAYS recommended as the defacto starting point for learning Rails.

    Anyway, the Ruby for Rails book by David Black is also a great book to check out. It really gets down and dirty with the core of both Rails and Ruby. Give it a look......
    agile book as i said uses two controllers for the example app: the admin controller for the admin part and the store controller for the user experience and if you search and read rails forums you will discover that anyone says that is bad design to use a controller named "admin" only to represent the admin side of the site.

  6. #6
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    Don't name it admin then - If they had the folks new to Rails typing in "lemons", "codfish", etc... for the controller names it would get quite confusing.

    It's a good book - so is sitepoints. Sitepoints doesn't even touch security - that would be the thing to focus a little on. As you learn those you can adapt any examples you run into into "real life practices" instead of the simple starting blocks both books give you.

  7. #7
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    Hey Skyblaze,

    It's always going to depend on your applications architecture as to how your organize and create your controllers. I saw the other thread on the forum where you were talking with someone about the controller amount and whatnot where they stated it being bad design. It's not so black and white. To say that it's bad application design simply because they only used two controllers isn't really appropriate. The depot application is actually fairly simple, so I would say that creating too many controllers for an application of this type would be bad design. Just think about it... the controller that manages the store is called "store" (forget that it's the forward facing part of the site) - the controller that manages administrative tasks is called "admin" - see a need for anything else? If I had an area in the site where I could manage my personal orders I might have an "account" controller with an "orders" action on that controller.

    The depot application is actually very good at showing some best practices, and being co-written by the creator of Rails I would say that it's a solid resource that should be looked at.

    Just my opinion.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Guru Skyblaze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by slavenski View Post
    Hey Skyblaze,

    It's always going to depend on your applications architecture as to how your organize and create your controllers. I saw the other thread on the forum where you were talking with someone about the controller amount and whatnot where they stated it being bad design. It's not so black and white. To say that it's bad application design simply because they only used two controllers isn't really appropriate. The depot application is actually fairly simple, so I would say that creating too many controllers for an application of this type would be bad design. Just think about it... the controller that manages the store is called "store" (forget that it's the forward facing part of the site) - the controller that manages administrative tasks is called "admin" - see a need for anything else? If I had an area in the site where I could manage my personal orders I might have an "account" controller with an "orders" action on that controller.

    The depot application is actually very good at showing some best practices, and being co-written by the creator of Rails I would say that it's a solid resource that should be looked at.

    Just my opinion.
    ok then i will learn also from it
    Anyway if you would have to manage for example another model as an admin in depot(it has only the product model to manage)? How can you do that? Always using the admin controller? Then it comes out the "famous" bad design of managing two or more models in the same controller with actions like: new_first_model, new_second_model, edit_first_model, edit_second_model etc.

  9. #9
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    That's what I'm saying, it's not bad design when there is nothing else to manage.


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