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  1. #26
    Sesame Street Iimitk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elduderino View Post
    I appreciate that you may have no interest in programming but to be honest, for the sake of making your job easier id get a good php/sql book. IF you learnt the bare basics you could build an admin section consisting of a simple login system and a few forms to allow your users to update content on your site. Plus you'll have the satisfaction of saying i made this!
    I'm afraid that's a contradiction! If the thread starter is basically in need of a simple CMS to do basic tasks why then he/she shouldn't use any of the available CMSs out there? Actually I'm quite sure that most people, even the talented, won't be able to build a reliable CMS just by reading a PHP/MySQL book! If someone learnt server-side/back-end languages then he/she must learn how to design the site's front-end, hence, (X)HTML/CSS & maybe JavaScript & the snowball would roll! Reading a programming and/or designing book(s) might let people make some modifications that add to their's site functionality or look, but not building a whole working & reliable site from scratch!

    Making a good CMS isn't at all an easy task. However, unless you're ready to roll up your sleeves & get your hands dirty with PHP, MySQL, (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc. I'm quite sure you'll find a CMS that'll perfectly suits your needs for a long time before you consider using another package or building a custom one!
    Imagination is more important than knowledge. - Einstein

  2. #27
    is craving 'the potato' slayerment's Avatar
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    I would also highly recommend Drupal although it does have a higher learning curve than others. But since you said you want complete control you probably understand web development fairly well... hence Drupal .

  3. #28
    .* draziW tnioPetiS *. bronze trophy
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    Quote Originally Posted by simsim View Post
    I would recommend TextPattern. Simple yet powerful.
    Ditto. Great CMS.

    EE (Expression Engine) is OK, but for the price I say steer away from that blog.

    I recently started learning Django/Python... Is pretty nice!

  4. #29
    I Never Give Up roosevelt's Avatar
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    Learn PHP and MySQL... and you will be able to make everything . Anyways you can try out Subdreamer CMS, its really good and effective.

  5. #30
    SitePoint Zealot barleytwist's Avatar
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    Wow! What a response!

    Thanks to all your replies. I am going to have to read these several times to get an idea of the way forward. I am currently using Contribute for a school website I've done as a first project and am now trying set it up to prevent novices (teachers & office staff) from landing the site in a mess.

    Contribute costs over 100 quid per station but I'm sure this cost can be offset by the cost of installing a server side CMS (?). I have another 'cusomer' who is demanding to be able to update the site so it seems the only option for this one is to get them to buy Contribute 3.1 and I'll create some templates for it.

    I am demanding that the sites I make are always pushing accessibility and use-ability. I am of the opinion that current CMSs do not easily permit this but I might be awry here. What are your opinions about that?

    I am using ISS at the moment but am thinking of getting WINAMP going to act as my test bed for a CMS.

  6. #31
    Addicted to the Source of Life PowerBit's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by simsim View Post
    I'm afraid that's a contradiction! ... unless you're ready to roll up your sleeves & get your hands dirty with PHP, MySQL, (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc. I'm quite sure you'll find a CMS that'll perfectly suits your needs for a long time before you consider using another package or building a custom one!
    I think elduderino comment was the best advice and there no need to attack it... Yet your positive addition is of worthy value...

    I too am looking for the best direction to take with CMS's... I think between the two of you, you have made a good echoed approach:

    I am going to read up on building my own CMS. Get the hands dirty. Plow the field, grab the seed and go for the long haul. That's what got most of us here. We don't always have to reinvent the wheel, but sometimes you gotta get into the head of the one that did to build your ride. I would echoes these two gentle man's fine points and say you should take a book in hand and experiement with what others offer... In time you'll be able use componants that are prebuilt and know how to customize them... Sometimes we gotta go out and get it done...

    May you find the best in your life... Peace...
    Billy

  7. #32
    Addicted to the Source of Life PowerBit's Avatar
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    Smile Let's look at the good...

    Quote Originally Posted by simsim View Post
    I'm afraid that's a contradiction! ... unless you're ready to roll up your sleeves & get your hands dirty with PHP, MySQL, (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc. I'm quite sure you'll find a CMS that'll perfectly suits your needs for a long time before you consider using another package or building a custom one!
    I think elduderino comment was the best advice and there no need to attack it... Yet your positive addition is of worthy value...

    I too am looking for the best direction to take with CMS's... I think between the two of you, you have made a good echoed approach:

    I am going to read up on building my own CMS. Get the hands dirty. Plow the field, grab the seed and go for the long haul. That's what got most of us here. We don't always have to reinvent the wheel, but sometimes you gotta get into the head of the one that did to build your ride. I would echoes these two gentle man's fine points and say you should take a book in hand and experiement with what others offer... In time you'll be able use componants that are prebuilt and know how to customize them... Sometimes we gotta go out and get it done...

    May you find the best in your life... Peace...
    Billy

  8. #33
    Web developer Carl's Avatar
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    Okay, I am not going to recommend a CMS. I also am not going to recommend that you learn programming. What I am going to do recommend that you look at a few things before making a decision. Then I am going to the reason for not going with some of the popular CMS. This is because they all have short comings that you will not see just from taking a recommendation.

    You want to first look at what your content is and where it is coming from.

    Are you going to build a community with lots of users?

    Will only one person be in charge of the entire site?

    Will the content remain static over long periods? a month a year? or will it change daily or weekly.

    Is the company a boss with an employee in charge of the site or a one-man show?

    Are you going to use more than one language?


    A lot of CMS' like Drupal and Xoops are great if you are going to build a community or plan on having lots of users. They are a pain in the butt if you are a one-man show.

    Joomla is a nice inbetweener but the code base and architecture are not for a beginning PHP coder.

    Wordpress is great for a single person site but not something to try and build a community of users on. You also will not like it much for a small company with multiple users.

    The others pretty much fall in the same categories, only the names change.

    If you are going to do a multilingual site then you will want to check for translations and how they are implemented.

    Do you need to learn a program like POedit and what gettext() is?

    Are there translations in your language?

    What languages come in the default installation of the CMS?


    There are lots of other questions but start with these will let you narrow the field down to a few choices.

  9. #34
    Matt Williams revsorg's Avatar
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    Has anyone got any experience with Typo3?
    work: revs | ecru
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  10. #35
    Web developer Carl's Avatar
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    I have studied and built with Typo3. If you are going to base a business on building with a CMS the Typo3 is the one to go with. But if your business is based on using low cost shared hosting then Typo3 will be you worst nightmare.

    Also Typo3 is not a casual date. You have to marry it, have kids and buy a house. Otherwise you will not get the benefits of its incredible code design.

  11. #36
    SitePoint Guru babyboy808's Avatar
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    MOd X CMS by far, Excellent control

  12. #37
    Mazel tov! bronze trophy kohoutek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by revsorg View Post
    Has anyone got any experience with Typo3?
    Typo3 is good. I am unsure of the quality of the code behind it though because it's huge. In fact, it is so performance heavy, that I wonder whether this CMS could not be lighter if coded differently.

    As for its use, it is very feature rich out of the box. It has many extensions. It even has an extension manager with which you can create your own extensions pretty quickly and conveniently if you know php, mysql etc.

    It takes a while to learn but once you know your way around it, it can be fun. Just make sure you have a really good server up your belt, otherwise you'll not have any fun.

    I much prefer the more slim line, yet undoubtedly feature rich ExpressionEngine. So much more intuitive, lighter and just as flexible in my opinion. However, it's not open source.
    Maleika E. A. | Rockatee | Twitter | Dribbble



  13. #38
    SitePoint Enthusiast
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    I would recommend CMS Made Simple. http://www.cmsmadesimple.org

  14. #39
    Web Design Addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhulse View Post
    Ditto. Great CMS.

    EE (Expression Engine) is OK, but for the price I say steer away from that blog.

    I recently started learning Django/Python... Is pretty nice!
    Don't get me wrong, I love TXP also (it was the first CMS I ever used) but you think the price is to high for EE at $99? Doesn't seem like to much to pay for a good product.

    Everyone is different but I actually found EE easier to understand what was going on that I did TXP. TXP took me about 2 months to understand a lot of the basics and after using it for about a year I still wasn't what I would call "fluent". But nonetheless it is a good option for free.
    Deron Sizemore
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  15. #40
    SitePoint Wizard cranial-bore's Avatar
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    I recently used Wordpress to create a quick, small low budget site for the first time. I eventually hacked the behaviour I wanted but definitely came to the conclusion that blogging software is for blogs.

    Moving to the live server was also a big pain the **** because WP insists on storing absolute links in the database, even to its own resources.

  16. #41
    SitePoint Enthusiast Zoubinette's Avatar
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    If you want to check out Joomla!, there are some pure CSS templates out there: check out the Aqualine template from www.joomlashack.com, or the Pollux template from www.joomlart.com. Both advertise tableless/pure CSS templates. I have started fooling around with modifying some of the free templates. Although I know CSS, and almost no PHP, it seems do-able. Depends how much you want to do yourself.

    But I agree with what others have said, the learning curve may be a bit steep and it may be too much functionality for what you want. You don't have to use all the modules and functions offered. On the other end, if you think you might want to grow, that maybe the way to go.

  17. #42
    Grr. Arrgh. Mr. B's Avatar
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    I use http://www.nucleuscms.org and I love it. It does pretty much everything I want it to and it's easy for someone like me who doesnt have much knowledge of things technical.

  18. #43
    SitePoint Zealot Mahz's Avatar
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    By the way, I'm a big fan of vBulletin. And I'm also a fan of having user submitted content (a community that drives itself). In the situation where you want to integrate both heavily (E.G. a forum-central website with user-posted content beyond threads), vBulletin itself is an extra CMS engine.

  19. #44
    SitePoint Addict JerXs's Avatar
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    I would have to say that I use Wordpress for almost everything! Wordpress IMO is the easiest to set up, to skin, to hack and pluss there is a plugin for everything you could ever want.

    I will say if your going to be building a very complexed site with high 1000's to 10's of thousands of pages it might not be your best option.

    WP has become much more than just a blogging tool...

  20. #45
    Non-Member Musicbox's Avatar
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    visit www.hotscripts.com and search for best cms

  21. #46
    SitePoint Zealot
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    Im wanting to have easier control over fixtures for my sports team, so the fields will be: home team, away team, result, date.

    So do any of these CMS' have the option of a calender sort of feature? I'm impressed with sNews, but it doesn't seem to have that feature.

  22. #47
    SitePoint Wizard
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    Quote Originally Posted by simsim View Post
    I'm afraid that's a contradiction! If the thread starter is basically in need of a simple CMS to do basic tasks why then he/she shouldn't use any of the available CMSs out there? Actually I'm quite sure that most people, even the talented, won't be able to build a reliable CMS just by reading a PHP/MySQL book! If someone learnt server-side/back-end languages then he/she must learn how to design the site's front-end, hence, (X)HTML/CSS & maybe JavaScript & the snowball would roll! Reading a programming and/or designing book(s) might let people make some modifications that add to their's site functionality or look, but not building a whole working & reliable site from scratch!

    Making a good CMS isn't at all an easy task. However, unless you're ready to roll up your sleeves & get your hands dirty with PHP, MySQL, (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, etc. I'm quite sure you'll find a CMS that'll perfectly suits your needs for a long time before you consider using another package or building a custom one!

    Sim Sim,

    I find your response interesting. I dont see how ive contradicted myself at all.
    i suggested learning some basic php/mysql as an alternative to using an open source cms becuase of my experience in using them.
    Building a custom cms has many, many advantages over using an open source system. The most important of these being that you have complete control over
    what it does. With an open source system there is always the task of adding and removing bits and pieces you dont need. The system that barleytwist needs sounds
    relativley strightfoward and could be built with the very basic in php/mysql( lets also assume that he has knwledge of html/css as he mentioned
    that it would need the cms would need to output to html/css and not tables)Yes there is a little learning to be done, but there is with any cms, my
    point is learning enough basic php to achieve this is in my opinion roughly the same amount of work as learning and manipulating a cms. Why not
    learn the basic php then you've got the power to make your system do what you want.
    .

    How do you think anyone learns anything? I learnt php/sql from a book a year ago in a very short amount of time and in fact my first project was a custom cms, which is
    used on a daily basis by a small group of people. Its completley reliable and was built with only a rough knowlwedge of php and databases.

    I wonder are you are programmer and do you have any experience using an open source cms?
    I ask becuase if you have any experience of php you'd have to agree that building a simple system, which is what barleytwist is after, that allows users to update content in a html document is
    extremely easy to do and can be achieved in a relativley small amount of time. A 'talented' developer could do this sort of thing in their
    sleep, its the bread and butter of programming! The sort of project anyone with minimal knowledge can achieve.
    If you have any experience of cms you'll know that there is a certain amount of learning
    involved and things are not always straightfoward if you want to modify the basic template. As i say go on over to textpattern now and take
    a look at their forum. See the sort of questions that get asked about modification of the basic template. You will realise that its not a straightfoward
    affair. on the other hand Simple php is straightfoward.

    My suggestion was to learn the php and you'll be able to build a system yourself and also have the programming knowledge to re-use and build upon.

  23. #48
    SitePoint Zealot
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    Some people (like me) do not have the time to do this. All we are asking for is a simple CMS that we can buy and easily install on websites. I am quite happy to pay a reasonable amount for this. Some of us are involved in other stuff that precludes taking time to to learn how to reinvent the wheel.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Booler View Post
    Some people (like me) do not have the time to do this. All we are asking for is a simple CMS that we can buy and easily install on websites. I am quite happy to pay a reasonable amount for this. Some of us are involved in other stuff that precludes taking time to to learn how to reinvent the wheel.
    Have you checked out any of the links supplied so far in the thread?

    What ones (if any) do you like so far?
    Deron Sizemore
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    My Sites: LogoGala | Golf Ledger (coming soon)
    Twitter: Deron Sizemore

  25. #50
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    I would have to recommend Joomla. I've heard others say that it has a high learning curve or its fairly complex. It does have more features or options then most but also gives you a little bit more flexibility.

    James


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