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  1. #26
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    vote Ted = Jedi Master!
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  2. #27
    SitePoint Member NetAtom's Avatar
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    While there are always exception, I would say you should get that BA. Sure, you might be in the minority and become a self made millionaire, but if you ever hope to work for another company, the BA is very, very useful. Entry level positions, like software engineers, who basically just follow the instructions of the elder brain, may not find them as useful but one thing I have found, in my experience is that:

    a. many companies will not look at your resume without a BA because of HR's hiring standards

    b. most companies, even the ones that hire you without a BA, will not consider you for advancement (that is, putting people under you) without a BA or better.

    That's how it is in NYC, at least. Your experience may vary. If I was in your shoes I would probably take a very brief hiatus, and use it to rest my mind and reorganize my priorities and then go back and excel. Average people can overcome their handicaps with hard work, and there's so many hours in the days, if you had a work ethic you could still maintain your current network and even make progress forward while still applying yourself to school.

  3. #28
    SitePoint Addict buildakicker's Avatar
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    I think you should take the time off.

    School isn't for everyone right away.

    The way I see it is, the reason you go to school is to gain knowledge to compete in the work place and retire. If you can make money out of school, read for understanding, increase in knowledge and are willing to continue your education in the future... why go now?

    In a few years you'll know what you'd like to become very skilled in, then attend. I am sure then you will be more focused and more interested.

    I took a year away from my home college. It was a great thing.

    More power to you!
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  4. #29
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    Most professionals I know, including myself, would not look twice at a potential employee unless they had at least a Bachelors degree. The degree itself is meaningless but the fact that it was earned shows that individual is devoted to their education and can in-fact complete goals set for themselves.

  5. #30
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    Thank you for so many replies guys, they were very helpful and insightful. I've made up my mind, and am confident that I've made the best decision possible. I'm going to be going to a community college where I live, taking only part time general classes that I will need regardless of my major. I'm confident that there is a way to both get a degree, and still devote a large amount of time to my other projects. This would be most likely for one semester before transferring to a larger school in my area. This is what I see in it:

    1) I now am starting to realize that a degree will be worth it, if anything, as something to show other people who can provide me with opportunities - whether it be employers, investment banks, venture capitalists, business partners, etc.

    2) I can go to class part time for this semester, allowing me to both continue school and focus on my entrepreneurial projects. I'll be living at home, but still attending a school and meeting people (social aspect).

    3) I'm currently unsure of what I would want my degree in, as I was never sure. This time will hopefully allow me to focus my interests and abilities and decide on where to go with the degree.

    4) I'll be saving money in tuition, while make even more money with my other projects. I'm already at a point where I'll have not only zero debt after school, but surplus money. This will only make that better.

    5) I've also read in some recent articles, about how women are less likely to marry men without degrees. It's just a statistic, but hey - I want to avoid any emotional troubles in the future that will hurt me! I think I will be able to meet more women through school, and attract more after school. This point is mostly humorous, but can also be taken at least somewhat seriously...

    I think this is a good compromise, and I won't be kicking myself in the future with this decision. If I decided to focus ONLY on school and wait until after it, I might be kicking myself saying why did I wait and finish school. On the other hand, if I take a break - I might later find myself saying why, oh why didn't I just finish it out back then?

    This way, I don't think I'll regret my decision no matter what happens, and I'm keeping all of my opportunities open.

    Thanks for your help in this!

  6. #31
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    A college degree is becoming more and more important everyday. at my university, which is a large and well known state school, the general consensus is that the best way to succeed is to get a graduate degree and that a bachelors degree just won't cut it for a lot of the new job applicants. this isn't neccessarily the case for everyone, though, but a bachelors is basically required if you ever want a regular job or even to do freelancing. most business owners like to know that the people they are working with have the patience and persistence to follow through with getting their degree. if you can boost up the grades and work on the sites part time, that would be great but I would suggest making the degree a priority. just my $.02, though.

  7. #32
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    My 2 cents...

    Take the break but go back. Before you go back, consider doing it part time at a local university. As someone said, consider you major-- given your interest in ecommerce, maybe switch to Comp Science or MIS type of degree.
    What did you plan to do with a Math degree? Teach? Acutary? Those are things to consider-- a good foundation in the concepts of your intended career is what you should be after.

    I worked full time as a programmer eearly in my career while pursuing my EE degree. I have used very little of that EE degree other than the stick-to-it part and the critical thinking/analysis skills taught in college. I did complete it but 23+ years into my career, nobody gives it a second look other than the off comment observation of having an engineering background.

    Yep, people can make it w/out a degree but early in one's career many people in companies/corp. world look for that piece of paper. I've also known many of a smart programmer and manager that didn't have degrees. Your chances of getting ahead in the corp world will be greater with a degree. Even venturing out on your own business will be aided by the right degree.

    net-net. Take the break. Figure out what you REALLY want to do. Set goals and deadlines.
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  8. #33
    Wanna-be Apple nut silver trophy M. Johansson's Avatar
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    I've never really realized why people are such in a hurry to go to college. I'm starting my college tuition this autmn, at the age of 24. The reason I didn't go it earlier was because I simply couldn't find anything that could keep my interest piqued for that long, plus I felt that I lacked self-discipline and maturity. Plus, I really wanted to run my own company for a while first, and it's doing very well indeed.
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  9. #34
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    In my opinion their is just one option: get your college degree.Offcourse you don't like all your classes .College is so important,not only for a possible job such as already stated earlier.But also for your development as a person.Your company will not grow really fast, but so be it.After you graduate you will have plenty of time to make a succes of your company.You also have the age to be academic formed.As soon as you get older a study such as applied mathemathics will be nearly impossible to do because you need a young brain to grasp really difficult mathematical principles.Your study is certainly gone help the development of the company.Because you will learn how to analyse and solve problems in an structured way.

    So enjoy your time in college. Don't run away after college,socialize, everybody is doing that at your age.It's the only time in your life you can really do what you want(and that's not working 60 hours a week in your company).

  10. #35
    Gone Fishing Japhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HaVri View Post
    Your study is certainly gone help the development of the company.Because you will learn how to analyse and solve problems in an structured way.

    ).

    I think this is the biggest scam going when it comes to college, the whole "we will teach you to think critically" mantra. If that were the case, that college grads consistently made smart, well thought out decisions, than I would be behind a degree 100%. I have worked with so many college grads, including a few MBA's, that were very poor decision makers and borderline fools. Well spoken, articulate and foolish. I've also worked with MBA's and BComms that were brilliant but I don;t believe that had anything to do with their scholling.

    Good decision making and intelligence is developed long before before you reach college. College is a battle of attrition and patience, kind of like a government job

  11. #36
    ☆★☆★ silver trophy vgarcia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Johansson View Post
    I've never really realized why people are such in a hurry to go to college.
    Nearly 20 years of being harassed by parents to go be a doctor I think. And once you're out of the rhythm of going to school it's hard to go back later and stick with it. That said...
    Quote Originally Posted by M. Johansson
    I'm starting my college tuition this autmn, at the age of 24. The reason I didn't go it earlier was because I simply couldn't find anything that could keep my interest piqued for that long, plus I felt that I lacked self-discipline and maturity. Plus, I really wanted to run my own company for a while first, and it's doing very well indeed.
    ...you seem to be adjusting fine, so good work!

  12. #37
    SitePoint Addict irkyo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HaVri View Post
    So enjoy your time in college. Don't run away after college,socialize, everybody is doing that at your age.It's the only time in your life you can really do what you want(and that's not working 60 hours a week in your company).
    Totally agree!!! enjoy the life and don't be in a hurry to try everything available around !!!

  13. #38
    SitePoint Enthusiast newdaynewdawn's Avatar
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    Switch schools (as you've said) -- change majors (web design, graphics, programming, etc.) -- get your degree.

    The road is littered with people who've said I'll take a year off and come back later. Sure... you can be successful without it.... but boy does it serve to open alot more potential doors with it than with out it. In fact, my retirement rate at my company is higher than the non-degreed people and had I not had the degree (Bachelor of Business Administration w/Computer Information Systems) I wouldn't have even gotten in the door on my current gig.

    Yeah, sure, if like Michael Dell you start running a computer supply parts destination out of your dorm room or whatever and the opportunity beats you on the head to take it then of course go and join the Dell and Gates brethren.

    Good Fortunes!

  14. #39
    SitePoint Addict drjones013's Avatar
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    The main problem lies in understanding why the degree is important in the first place. There are going to be people who insist that you have a degree for a specific job, not necessarily because the degree means that you are "better" than someone else but it does imply a level of competency. My sister graduated from USC and pulls 70k a year starting merely because of where she graduated from.
    I finished my degree in music (just as useful as a degree in english if you don't want to become a teacher) simply because my parents thought it would be a good idea. The diploma really doesn't mean anything to anyone but myself-- I feel better for having finished. My friend Eric on the other hand dropped out of high school and started a computer repair business after dropping out of college; the guy makes more in a week than I do in a month. College wasn't as important to him as actually making money and he manages to hold his business together more than adequately despite his lack of formal education.
    If money is what's important to you then there's no point in denying the ability now if you'll simply fall back on it later. A diploma literally is just a piece of paper except in the perception of the holder.

  15. #40
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    Small note:

    I started with some small ventures before going to college ...went to college ... and ended up self employed doing more or less the same things anyway (well almost, and I'm sure I could have learned it by myself), not because I had to but because it was still "what I wanted to do" BUT, I feel its much easier to do everything from customer accusition, getting the respect of your peers (when you have a M.Sc in engineering do you really wan't to take a job working for someone 10 years your junior with only a highschool diploma, I think many people think that way), plus many other things I don't have the energy to cough up.

    So regardless a college degree will probably help you in many ways that you can't see at the moment, even though it might not be in the actual "direct" work that you do.


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