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  1. #1
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    IT employement ..im trying?

    hi

    anyone out there ever done an IT course only to graduate and feel totally underqualified to get a job?

    Thats how i feel ... does anyone know exactly what is expected from you by an employer ..i mean what extent of knowledge do they expect you to have ..

    I was hoping to get into web developement

    cheers chris

  2. #2
    I'm baaaaaaaaaaaaack! Fluffykins's Avatar
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    The biggest factor that's going to help you get a job in web development is ability, and experience. OK that's two factors but never mind...

    Having a degree is certainly going to help you a lot by doing that you've proved to yourself and an employer that you're smart (you'd have to be to pass it, right?), committed, can manage yourself and your time well and have the drive to stick at a course for several years to get where you want to be.

    However, in a market like web development that's not always enough on it's own. A strong portfolio is going to help whether you look for a full time job or work freelance. A decent portfolio is going to prove to people that you're talented and know your stuff. If you're applying for a job that say asks for ASP and JavaScript knowledge and you know you have enough to do the job, make sure you can back up your claims with examples.

    Relevent work experience is always really helpful, but you'll find it really hard to get a job without it, right? Catch 22. The solution to that is to create yourself a portfolio and online resume that you can point people to. If that involves doing some free design work for family or friends then go for it. It'll be worth it in the end.

    In answer to your question, I think employers expect you to have *enough* knowledge to do your job well. If it's coding in ASP and you don't know every last bit of ASP syntax don't worry too much. As long as you know where to look up the bit of code you need you'll be fine. During my job as webmaster for a university I think I spent more time with my nose in a Fireworks or ASP reference manual than I did sat in front of the packages, but that was ok because the job got done in the end and they were happy with it.

    I hope that helped a bit. Good luck!

    Ady
    v-technologies - Freelance Goodness.

  3. #3
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    Hey Chris

    May I ask what corse you did? I'm hopfully going to get into a batchlor of IT and computing this year... but i am hoping that it is not going to bore me stupid

  4. #4
    SitePoint Addict Seer's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Fluffykins
    During my job as webmaster for a university I think I spent more time with my nose in a Fireworks or ASP reference manual than I did sat in front of the packages, but that was ok because the job got done in the end and they were happy with it.
    I've wondered how employers would feel about a new employee hired to do a job and spending time using a book for reference. It seems logical and I don't see anything wrong with it, but does the employer look down on it?

    I did once see a "Networking for Dummies" book on someone's shelf.
    Everything has been figured out, except how to live. - Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980)

  5. #5
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    When I did work experience at a big website design company (50+ employees) they had a mini library of referance books, so whetever you needed you could find easily

  6. #6
    I'm baaaaaaaaaaaaack! Fluffykins's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Seer
    I've wondered how employers would feel about a new employee hired to do a job and spending time using a book for reference. It seems logical and I don't see anything wrong with it, but does the employer look down on it?
    I don't see anything wrong with it either. I think the line needs to be drawn when you enter a job knowing nothing or close to nothing about what you're expected to you. If you do that you're only asking for the sack.

    With IT and programming jobs especially I think it's fine. How many coders do you know who know every last bit of the language? Even the best web designer in the world needs to look up a bit of HTML or CSS syntax every now and then

    I guess you could get some employers who think that because you look things up every now and then you're not as smart as they thought you were. Hopefully most will judge you by what you produce and the fact that by burying your nose in a book you're expanding your knowledge which will ultimately make you a better employee.

    Ady
    v-technologies - Freelance Goodness.


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