SitePoint Sponsor

User Tag List

Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    SitePoint Zealot
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    113
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Is there any form of CSS movement?

    Or group or something to push for all browsers to handle CSS the same? I would think that in this day and age of the digital revolution, and all the groups and associations out there for standards and practices (in programming, code of conduct, etc.) that there would be a push for all browsers to handle CSS the same.

    Sorry, it's just frustrating enough to learn CSS, but then to have to learn how to make all browsers display essentially the same thing. Remanants of the Netscape vs. Internet Explorer days, each coming out with different tags and uses.

  2. #2
    SitePoint Enthusiast
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    59
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The World Wide Web Consortium is in charge of defining web standards, they're at www.w3.org. The Web Standards Project is fighting for adoption of those standards, and you can find them at www.webstandards.org. They also run the Acid2 Test which is a good yardstick for how well a browser conforms to standards.

    As far as I know, Safari 2.0, iCab 3.0, Konqueror 3.5, and Opera 9.0 are the only browsers that have passed (in that order). Mozilla says the Firefox 3.0 release is going to pass, and the Firefox 2.0 release does pretty well. Internet Explorer 7.0 is by far the worst of the modern browsers. You can read more about all that here.

    In my personal opinion, web design can be frusterating, but web standards have come a long way. Unfortunately, a lot of this hinges on Microsoft's development of IE, and that was virtually non existant for the last 5 years. I'm glad to see IE 7 out, but I hope they continue to improve IE's standards compliance and don't drop the ball again. Personally, I can't wait for the day when I can stop supporting IE 6 and I'm even more excited for across-the-board implementation of CSS 3. When that happens the lives of web developers will get a lot easier.

  3. #3
    I meant that to happen silver trophybronze trophy Raffles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Tanzania
    Posts
    4,662
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    That's what the W3C is supposed to be for. They define the specifications for CSS (as well as other languages) and then it's up to the browser manufacturers to decide whether to support these specifications or not. The obvious bad boy here is Microsoft who, despite being a member of the W3C, does not adhere to them well and introduces proprietary code. Most other people do a reasonable job at supporting the standards, but nobody is perfect.

    I do think that eventually it will all smoothen out and browsers will all support CSS in the same way. Developers will see the benefits of adhering to the standards set by the W3C and, as members, can contribute to the decision-making and so they should have no reason to complain about specification they're unhappy about. Even Microsoft has taken steps to listen to web designers and have attempted to increase their compliance with these standards with IE7, but it's still far from up-to-date.

    But of course, at the end of the day, browser makers can do whatever they want, really. We just have to hope that they'll realise the benefits of being nice. I honestly do think it'll smoothen out over time and the life of the web designer will become easier.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •