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    XHTML vs. DHTML

    I have a pretty basic understanding of HTML and can get by using online resources. I am currently teaching myself PHP, but had goals to learn other languages afterwards.

    I wanted to learn:
    -CSS, XML, Javascript, MySQL

    I also want to learn how to master HTML. I came across the term DHTML and thought that it would be perfect to master DHTML as, according to http://webdesign.about.com/cs/dynami...a/aa030298.htm, DHTML combines CSS, HTML, and XHTML.

    Is this true? Can I, by learning "DHTML", master HTML, XHTML, CSS, and some Javascript? If so, what are some good books to learn this combo language.

    Thanks,
    Chris

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    Robert Wellock silver trophybronze trophy xhtmlcoder's Avatar
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    You need to master (x)html and CSS as DHTML is not actually a language. Document Object Model (DOM) is what you need to study if you want to get really good with scripting.

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    He's No Good To Me Dead silver trophybronze trophy stymiee's Avatar
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    DHTML isn't a combination language. It's just the name given to using JS/HTML/CSS together to achieve dynamic content on a page. You can't do DHTML without first knowing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

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    'DHTML' is a (rather outdated) term for 'dynamic HTML'. It's essentially HTML with JavaScript that changes the appearance – and sometimes the content – of the page. Cool kids nowadays rather talk about 'Ajax' (asynchronous JavaScript and XML), which is a form of DHTML.

    For most web professionals, 'DHTML' screams '1990s'. Forget about it. There are tons of accessibility problems associated with DHTML, too.

    Learn HTML properly. That's the foundation of everything on the Web. Then learn how to use CSS along with your HTML to make your pages aesthetically pleasing. JavaScript would be the next step, to add some interactive features. Parallel to that, study the topics of usability and accessibility, to give you a perspective on how to use features like CSS and JavaScript.

    XML is more a data storage format, and it's not really meant for Web pages. XHTML is XML with predefined elements to mimic HTML. Look at the XHTML vs HTML FAQ to learn more, and to see that it's not really worth bothering with right now.

    A server-side scripting language (like PHP) plus knowledge about relational database and SQL are the next stepping stone, which will allow you to to much more than static pages and client-side scripts.

    For larger-scale 'enterprise' applications you will need to look into either Java/J2EE or Microsoft's .NET platform.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

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    SitePoint Wizard bronze trophy Tyssen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AutisticCuckoo
    'DHTML' is a (rather outdated) term for 'dynamic HTML'. It's essentially HTML with JavaScript that changes the appearance and sometimes the content of the page. Cool kids nowadays rather talk about 'Ajax' (asynchronous JavaScript and XML), which is a form of DHTML.
    I've noticed the term DHTML coming back into usage a bit lately on various blogs/articles, usually relating to menus.

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    Thanks for all the replies. I figured I would have to learn them separately but just wondered if I should be learning how to use them together. I do like the idea of ditching the archaic DHTML and looking into Ajax.

    Thanks again!

    -Chris
    Chris Regnery . Web Administrator | admin@growstronger.com
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    SitePoint Author silver trophybronze trophy

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    That was what it was used for, to a large degree, in the '90s. Drop-down and flyout menus. Also, link rollovers (before CSS and :hover were available).
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane

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    SitePoint Wizard drhowarddrfine's Avatar
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    I do like the idea of ditching the archaic DHTML and looking into Ajax.
    The DHTML term may be archaic but the methods are not and Ajax is not a replacement for DHTML but just another one of many methods that comes under the 'dhtml' umbrella.

    A simpler way to think of all of this is just javascript using all the available resources and it's nothing more than that.


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