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  1. #1
    SitePoint Enthusiast J.Ryan's Avatar
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    Question Creating and Maintaining a Portfolio

    Howdy folks,

    As I am learning new things and applying my skills on various websites, I have begun to wonder what to do to 'mark my trail.' I know that having a traditional artist's portfolio usually involves taking pictures of your art, or even having the art itself available... but how does one translate this for web design? Do you have a domain dedicated to serving copies of previous sites? And what do you do for these sites: Do you keep the links active? What if they are sites written for a client?

    Thanks for any tips and ideas!
    -Jess
    Bluesky Saddle Blankets (and other handmade wool stuff)

  2. #2
    SitePoint Enthusiast newdaynewdawn's Avatar
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    All of that varies really... your best bet is to just google web design and look at how people are doing their portfolios -- I've seen many different styles. Somebody else might have another suggestion as to how to capture your screen shots, etc. Some keep hot links to live working stuff and then alot of others maintain simply maintain a series of screen shots with a LIVE link if they given site is active on the web.

    As far as maintaining them... how long you keep links active and the like is up to you. As your skills progress you'll phase out some sites just naturally as you decide what represents you best.

    Clients... I'd ask all clients to some degree as far as permission (do they mind, etc.) depending on the "level" of the client or whatever. Beyond that you'll probably also have some situations where you did a site and a "client" never uses it and/or for whatever reason they change to something else (another design) in a few months to a year.

    Look around though and then see what type of screen capture / thumbnail combination you might want to do.

  3. #3
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    molona's Avatar
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    Most of the time you show a picture of the site with a link to the actual site (previous permission of the owner, of course, which will normally give it as it is free promotion for him)

    But the buy with the "such a long name" above is right. There are different styles, so you need to see what suits you best.

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard silver trophybronze trophy Nadia P's Avatar
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    A portfolio page on your own website is sufficient. If you don't have permission or if you don't want to link to a client site, you can include a graphic of the finished design with a link to the live site, with a small explanation of what you did to complete the site. If the site has been changed since you worked on it and you don't want the current site in your portfolio, then a small picture of your version with a link to a larger picture woud work (I do this if the site has gone by the wayside and isn't live any more).

    In most cases you should ask the client whether they mind that you link to their site. Most are happy for you to do this.

    Nadia

  5. #5
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    Yeah and the design of your portfolio says a lot about your own work, so it's important to spend enough time on it, don't just create a simpel page where you show your work, make sure the portfolio itself looks professional too.

  6. #6
    SitePoint Enthusiast J.Ryan's Avatar
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    Coolio!

    Thanks. I like the snapshot idea. Plus, I can do this with my own personal pages which I take pleasure in changing often just for the fun of it (I figure, since just about no one reads them, they are a good place for me to practice new things that I learn and the frequent changes won't upset my audience). This would not only be a record of what I've done, but it will serve to show me how I've changed over time. Hopefully for the better. Heh.

    Thanks again guys!
    -Jess
    Bluesky Saddle Blankets (and other handmade wool stuff)

  7. #7
    SitePoint Enthusiast stilltsie's Avatar
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    For someone just getting their feet wet, the design of your porfolio site goes a long way. However, the actual portfolio is what clients are there to look at, so beef it up as quickly as possible. A couple of things you can do is, like you said profile your personal pages, and also creat a few mock designs or case studies for ficticious companies. Hope this helps.

  8. #8
    SitePoint Enthusiast J.Ryan's Avatar
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    Oh, the mock designs are a good idea. Plus that lets me just get creative without the pressure associated with 'real' work. Thanks!

    -Jess
    Bluesky Saddle Blankets (and other handmade wool stuff)

  9. #9
    SitePoint Member James L's Avatar
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    Portfolio site will be the most important thing when you are looking for work.


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