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  1. #1
    FBI secret agent digitman's Avatar
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    Exclamation Non-js compatible or not non-js compatiable?

    Hi, this is more like a business question than a programming question. I see how lots of people here say that you should do a non-javascript version of your site first, and then start to put in the AJAX and javascript bells and whistles. This way it still works if someone has got javascript disabled.

    But if you think about that in a real world situation, you only have so much time to spend at a project to complete it. I would rather spend it all on featuers that people will actuall use than on something that 95% of the people will never use, simply so i can be "compatible" which will not make me money.

    Think about this, it will take up at least 40% of the total time you spend at your project to make it non-javascript compatible. Personally I have some forms which ask for a category name and a button to add it, and if you click it, the category is added on the fly with javascript.

    If I was to make this non-js comatible, I would have to have the form submitted when the click the button, which is fine, except everything else they wrote in the form before they clicked that button would be lost and it'll be an extra headache to keep track of that. Very boring and hardly profitable.

    Whats your opinion?

  2. #2
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    All depends on the goals of your project.

    But yeah, the number of users not using JavaScript is extremely low in most scenarios. Personally, I try to make sure my sites are accessible with or without JavaScript, but some features may be available only to those using JavaScript.
    I'm available for hire! - www.deftdevelopment.com

  3. #3
    Programming Since 1978 silver trophybronze trophy felgall's Avatar
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    Some of the people who can't use Javascript are disabled and have been known to sue web site owners when their site is not usable for people with their disability.

    If you only use Javascript to enhance functionality and speed responses then your site should work whether it is enabled or not.

    Modern web browsers (but not IE) make it easy to turn Javascript off temporarily to see what effect it has making it easy to ensure that your page works both ways. Since you should test in several different browsers anyway, turning off Javascript in IE for testing is seldom needed.
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  4. #4
    I ♥ PHP
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    This is a hard situation to answer, and it gets harder each day. It really does depend on your intended target audience. If you are building some sort of online application you may be forgiven for excluding those with Javascript turned off, like Basecamp or Google Maps. If you are creating a content based site, then I think it would be crazy to exclude thise without Javascript, unless your target audience are developers.

    There is always an alternative to a Javascript approach, it just depends on, as you said, you want to spend the time to work on it.

    Personally I will always provide the alternative unless working on a Javascript based application.

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    Jordan

  5. #5
    Caveat surfer Buddy Bradley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madcap
    But yeah, the number of users not using JavaScript is extremely low in most scenarios.
    1 in 10 according to pretty much all the stats I have access to. Not huge, but not exactly negligible either - are you going to ask your client to take a 10% cut in profits because you can't be bothered to spend an extra few hours getting it to work without Javascript?

    Also as felgall says, your laziness could cause access problems for some groups of users. If you want to call yourself a professional, you should do your job properly.

    (Note: comments not aimed specifically at madcap but at all web developers)

  6. #6
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    To follow up on felgall's accurate assessment, in most countries, including the US, large and government websites are legally required to provide accessible content.

    Are you working for the landlord who won't put in the wheelchair ramp?

  7. #7
    FBI secret agent digitman's Avatar
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    Well, just because I don't support non-javascript enabled browsers doesn't mean my site won't be accessible to people with disabilities. I mean, disabled people can still have javascript enabled right?


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