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  1. #1
    SitePoint Member
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    I am trying not to overprice or underprice my rate structure. I'd like some feedback on this regarding the following services:

    1. Basic Web Pages - by the hour or by the page - which and how much?
    2. Web Pages with Java elements - how much per hour?
    3. Web page updates and modifications - how much per hour?
    4. Custom Graphics - by the hour or by the job - which and how much?
    5. Forms - by the hour or by the form - which and how much?
    6. Customizing Cold Fusion Templates - How much per hour or per tag?

    And anything else you can think of!

    Thank you,

    Donna



  2. #2
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    Your pricing structure will be as individual as you are.

    You should come up with a combination of prices. You can charge xxx amount for a standard web package but then charge an hourly fee for modifications and add ons to that package. I personally charge between $25 and $40 per hour for HTML and standard PC work. I will charge up to $160 per hour for customized C++ programming though. The rule of thumb is the harder the work is the more you charge. Figure out what you want your average yearly salary to be. Add to that your overhead (Business rent, utilities, employee costs, equipment). If your going solo and work out of your home then your overhead will be negligible. Take that number and divide it by 2000 (40 hours a week working 50 weeks a year). Then you will have your base hourly figure. If you want to work 60 hours a week (not overdoing it yet) then you can divide it by 3000. I would stick to 40 because its a more realistic figure.

    If you want to $50,000 in a year then you have to charge $25 per hour. From that figure you can say ok... HTML requires less skill than graphic design so I will charge $15 per hour for HTML work and $35 per hour for graphics work. Of course COld Fusion requires more skill but it will be used only half as much as HTML so you charge $50 per hour. The reason being that if you only do Cold Fusion one year and its in half as much demand as HTML you'll only work for half as many clients.

    I hope this gives you idea about how to price your services.

    ------------------
    Wayne Luke
    WR Moderator
    Internet Media Provider

  3. #3
    Your Lord and Master, Foamy gold trophy Hierophant's Avatar
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    The needs of each individual client will dictate the perceived value. If the client is a local real-estate office then adding them to a search engine of national real estate listings will be viewed as more beneficial than listing them at Google.

    At your initial consultation with a prospective customer (this should always be free) you can get an idea of what their needs and budget are. Offering to use their existing marketing materials in the webpage will increase perceived value. The key to increasing perceived value is making each client feel unique and throw in things that make them feel better about your work i.e. small changes, search engine submissions, 3 months free maintenance.

    ------------------
    Wayne Luke
    WR Moderator
    Internet Media Provider

    [This message has been edited by wluke (edited March 29, 2000).]

  4. #4
    SitePoint Wizard westmich's Avatar
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    Another school of thought is to find out how much your competition is charging and base your prices on slightly less then theirs. Or package yourself differently then them.

    It seems like most web designers in my area come from a graphics design background and like to charge x amount per hour. My strategy has been to offer an up-front priced package. Clients know excatly what they are getting and how much it will cost. Anything additional is an hourly rate depending on the type of work, i.e. the more programing, the higher the price.

    I think when potential clients compare apples to apples; there is more preceived value.

    IMHO,
    Westmich

  5. #5
    SitePoint Member
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    I understand your method for calculating the desired income.

    My thought though, is to try and base the rate on the client's perception of value as well. One of the things I try to do when courting a client or discussing rate structure is to get in a situation where I can view the source code of a web page with them present. This boosts the client's perception of value, as they see just how complex the coding can be.

    Any feedback on rates based on desired income PLUS the client's perception of value? What will the market bear?

    Any tips on increasing the client's perception of value?


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