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  1. #26
    Non-Member lostseed's Avatar
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    this kind of stuff just ruins my day when i see it

  2. #27
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    I'd have to say that I'm a fence sitter, to a degree, but have learned in my years of online experience and self employment that most things in life are truely a matter of perception, and things are about 90% above the neck. I agree that tactful ways of letting someone know about a "broken" website is definitely an ethical approach, but the nuances in the way it is done can make one look less than ethical. For example, as a website designer and owner, I have had times when friendly emails have pointed out the fact of dead links and such. I have always been completely happy to recieve such notices as long as they are worded in a diplomatic manner. I've also been known to send out such tactfully worded emails to webmasters of other websites at times I've found "broken" content or links on their pages.

    The way I look at it is this. We all take hits from the search engines when we have a website that provides broken links to content, whether that content be local or external, we still pay a price. Based on that fact, the ethical responce, IMHO, is to provide tactful information to the webmaster or even the website designer so they may fix the problem. You never know when you can create an alliance with another design firm that might, at some point in time, become overtaxed with work. Such strategic alliances work well for subcontracting work. Many times, a tactful and friendly message to another design firm about a website problem can lead to lasting relationships where work might be subcontracted out between the two firms at times that work is particularly heavy. If you've sent them an email outlining the specific problem, and maybe a "code snippet" to fix it, you've already done the work for them. A simple copy and paste, and their problem is solved. It shows your ability while painting a memorable experience within their mind, which is a reason to call you next time they have work they can't cover. Just my two cents.

  3. #28
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    hi

    i am a new member to this site

  4. #29
    Non-Member melancholic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajaym_13
    i am a new member to this site
    lol that was random

    Anyway, back on topic, I guess you can see it as a business opportunity.

    Build a web solution of some description ready for demo and/or have a designer ready who will charge low enough so that you can make your 50% mark up on their charge and contact that beefed up tourism place and tell them that there is something wrong with their site and youd like to help them out.

    If they are greatful, say no problem and present your solution and/or design.

    If they give you the cold shoulder, submit their site to http://www.webpagesthatsuck.com/ then send them an email from an anonymous hotmail account tell them

    "ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US"

    (ok... so mine went off on a tangent... but I'm sure there was a message there somewhere)

    welcome to the site ajawm_13

  5. #30
    #titanic {float:none} silver trophy
    molona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by melancholic
    If they give you the cold shoulder, submit their site to http://www.webpagesthatsuck.com/ then send them an email from an anonymous hotmail account tell them

    "ALL YOUR BASE ARE BELONG TO US"

    (ok... so mine went off on a tangent... but I'm sure there was a message there somewhere)

  6. #31
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    I've more than once sent mail to sites that were broken, sometimes with code examples I composed after viewing their pages in a code editor. Most often, I get no reply at all, but every now and then I get a thank-you email.

    When working with strangers, I find "this appears to be broken" works better than "your application sucks because of this, that and the other thing" (I say application because I began programming with stone knives and bearskins, and yes, I HAVE used both approaches - the second one is good for motivating a talented young programmer who's filled with himself to come back down to Earth and fall out of love with his own code).

    And yes, if it's not your organization, always tell the client that there's a problem, not the designer, because the client is the one who cared enough to lay out the money and probably cares enough to want you to have a good site experience. If it IS your organization, you have to be the one to assess the political ramifications of stepping forth visibly - an anonymous note may be the best way if the designer is politically powerful in your group and tends to have an ego problem, but don't discount bringing the issue up if your group counts excellence over ego. Think of it (and present it) as voluntary, incidental user acceptance testing.

    Christopher P. Kile

  7. #32
    SitePoint Member cs-studios's Avatar
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    I know what the origional poster is saying. Its frustrating to see crappy pages resembling expages from the 90's(remember them?) when graphic design is your thing. It makes me cringe, but, as a later poster wrote, forget about the other guy...they'll probably resent your interference. In other words...close your eyes and hit the back button, its not worth your time
    cs-studios changing over to bythecurbside

  8. #33
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    What I really hate is seeing a webpage with a lot of animation on it. I also hate webpages that use frames.
    I think webmasters should be continuously updating their web pages in order to bring it to the current standards.

  9. #34
    SitePoint Zealot Wynnefield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoSmokingPunKs:
    and am wondering how to approach another local designer and tell them that their work is broken.
    My approach would not be the designer, but the city's Marketing team. I would softly offer a suggestion to examine the "broken section" of the site, and let them know as a concerned business owner, you would hope they could approach the site designer to repair the site.

    These leaves you anonymous regarding a relationship with another local (possibly) designer and lets the city know you have the customer skills to approach this softly and politely. Perhaps next time the city needs work, ...

  10. #35
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    Haha I'm with melancholic.

    No seriously just tell them that their website is broken and ask politely if they would please clean it up. If not maybe offer to fix it up for them yourself...

    Or send an anonymous e-mail from a "visitor" complaining that it was broken/hard to navigate and discouraged them from visiting.
    "See you at the Tradeshow Expo"

    onlinetradeshowexpo.com

  11. #36
    SitePoint Addict kirikintha's Avatar
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    Or send an anonymous e-mail from a "visitor" complaining that it was broken/hard to navigate and discouraged them from visiting.
    Heck - have everyone you know who uses that site to send it to them, EVERYONE I SAY - if the person who designed this site cares at all about their work they'd change it. Sounds like a desk top publisher to me, not a professional designer. Or it's a business opportunity where no one is maintaining the site. I change broken links immediately, it takes like 5 seconds. So, be savvy, use some diplomacy and a little tact and it should be fine. Changing broken links should in no way be a major deal - it happens all the time. It's probably a problem with relative and absolute url's.
    myspace.com/tarsus
    Technical Coordinator
    BCMT
    "Not impossible, just hard to do!"

  12. #37
    Programming Team silver trophybronze trophy
    Mittineague's Avatar
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    contacting broken sites

    I would not suppose my sense of design aesthetics to be better than anyone else's, so personally I would never contact a site saying "your design needs improvement". I have contacted 3 sites regarding something that was broken.
    I contacted a local political group that had a broken js slideshow. I pointed out that the script had a conflicting variable name with another script on the page, and that if they changed the name of one or the other the slideshow would work. They fixed it and thanked me (the person was a non-pro volunteer).
    I also contacted the webmaster of a famous musician's site pointing out that one of the pages had a link that if clicked hung the browser and required a reboot. I even explained how to fix it. They responded, "wow, I'm surprised you took the time to look into this". But almost 2 years later and they still have not yet fixed it!
    I also contacted a local charitable group saying that I noticed much of the site's content was out-of-date. I offered to volunteer my help a few hours a month in any way they saw fit. I did volunteer telecommuting work for them for almost 3 years before the organisation finally decided to hire a pro webmaster.
    A small dataset, but it seems that volunteer workers seem more responsive to volunteered help than "professionals" (getting_$ != "pro").


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