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  1. #1
    SitePoint Zealot nicc9's Avatar
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    Question is it POSSIBLE using XHTML 1.1?

    I read 'what's the difference between XHTML 1.0 and 1.1', and maybe I could have posted under that thread, but I thought my question was kinda different.

    basically, I'd like to start using XHTML 1.1, including the modules etc., but I can't really find an article on whether this is POSSIBLE or not.

    that means, if it's supported and by which browsers, if there are hacks for IE, and stuff like that.

    I know it prolly wouldn't be smart programming a commercial site in XHTML 1.1, but could it theoratically ce done?

    thanks, any advise/ like to articles appreciated,

    NICC9

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    Quote Originally Posted by nicc9
    I read 'what's the difference between XHTML 1.0 and 1.1', and maybe I could have posted under that thread, but I thought my question was kinda different.
    Really?

    Quote Originally Posted by nicc9
    basically, I'd like to start using XHTML 1.1, including the modules etc., but I can't really find an article on whether this is POSSIBLE or not.
    It depends on what you mean by 'possible'. Technically, it's possible. But it's hardly useful for a general-audience site.

    Quote Originally Posted by nicc9
    that means, if it's supported and by which browsers
    It's 'supported' by at least Opera 8/9, Gecko browsers and Safari. None of them have native support for Ruby annotations, though, so your users will need plugins if you plan on using those.

    XHTML 1.1 is just a reformulation of XHTML 1.0 using Modularization of XHTML. It deprecates a few minor things (which makes it non-backwards compliant with HTML, so it SHOULD NOT be served as text/html) and adds Ruby annotations, but that's about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by nicc9
    if there are hacks for IE, and stuff like that.
    IE doesn't support any version of XHTML. At all.
    You can fake it by serving the document as application/xml, which will make IE recognise it as XML, but since it doesn't support the XHTML namespace declaration, it will treat the document as generic XML. That means there'll be no default style sheet, so you'll have to provide CSS rules for every element type. I haven't tested how this works with assistive technologies, but my guess is that it won't be good.

    On my (hibernating) blog, I currently serve XHTML 1.1 to compliant user agents (and HTML 4.01 Strict to the rest). It works, but I could just as well have used XHTML 1.0 Strict, or just HTML 4.01 Strict for everyone since the documents must be possible to transform into that anyway. The next version will just use HTML 4.01 Strict, because there is no point in using any version of XHTML at this time.
    Birnam wood is come to Dunsinane


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